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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

John Ovretveit, Albert Wu, Richard Street, Harold Thimbleby, Friederike Thilo and Annegret Hannawa

The purpose of this paper is to explore a non-technical overview for leaders and researchers about how to use a communications perspective to better assess, design and use…

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1127

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a non-technical overview for leaders and researchers about how to use a communications perspective to better assess, design and use digital health technologies (DHTs) to improve healthcare performance and to encourage more research into implementation and use of these technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative overview, showing through examples the issues and benefits of introducing DHTs for healthcare performance and the insights that communications science brings to their design and use.

Findings

Communications research has revealed the many ways in which people communicate in non-verbal ways, and how this can be lost or degraded in digitally mediated forms. These losses are often not recognized, can increase risks to patients and reduce staff satisfaction. Yet digital technologies also contribute to improving healthcare performance and staff morale if skillfully designed and implemented.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers are provided with an introduction to the limitations of the research and to how communications science can contribute to a multidisciplinary research approach to evaluating and assisting the implementation of these technologies to improve healthcare performance.

Practical implications

Using this overview, managers are more able to ask questions about how the new DHTs will affect healthcare and take a stronger role in implementing these technologies to improve performance.

Originality/value

New insights into the use and understanding of DHTs from applying the new multidiscipline of communications science. A situated communications perspective helps to assess how a new technology can complement rather than degrade professional relationships and how safer implementation and use of these technologies can be devised.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

B.H. Rudall

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408

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Tony Cawkell

This review covers those aspects of communications which are relatively new and will probably have a continuing impact for at least two years — although this forecast…

Abstract

This review covers those aspects of communications which are relatively new and will probably have a continuing impact for at least two years — although this forecast, like nearly all other forecasts, is likely to be mostly wrong. A small amount of essential basic material is included — such as the section entitled ‘The bandwidth/speed imperative’, So much effort is being devoted to this subject, particularly in the case of POTS ( Plain Old Telephone System) improvements, that a few words about it seems to be in order.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

John Knight

This paper aims to inform and improve the quality of electronic products and services by outlining an approach to ethically grounded design.

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1333

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to inform and improve the quality of electronic products and services by outlining an approach to ethically grounded design.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of design disciplines were investigated using desk research and also learning from experience in commercial design practice in the mobile phone, Internet and software industries.

Findings

It is suggested that design “scripts” specific behaviours with either good or bad results. Scripts have a behavioural element and they define the physical, social and individual impact of products and services. This suggests that designers should be aware of the impact design decisions have throughout the product lifecycle. In order to achieve this, three ethical design principles (situated research, reflexivity and participation) are proposed to frame ethical design practice.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that measuring impact alone is insufficient to minimise harm caused by electronic products and services. Instead, research should focus on positively informing design through actionable results in the participatory design tradition. Conversely, design needs to accommodate research into measuring the impact of products in order to deliver long‐term benefits to users rather than perpetuating passive consumption.

Practical implications

The paper provides an overview of methods for value‐centred interaction design based on the analysis of alternative approaches to ethical design.

Originality/value

The research in the paper spans a number of related but heretofore separate disciplines pertinent to deepening design thinking. These disciplines are critiqued on the basis of their appropriateness and applicability to an ethical design approach and the concept of scripting, used in traditional design, is applied to interactivity. Lastly, three new principles are proposed for ethically grounded design.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Ian Harris, Richard C. Jennings, David Pullinger, Simon Rogerson and Penny Duquenoy

The purpose of this paper is to set out a structured meta‐methodology, named DIODE, for the ethical assessment of new and emerging technologies. DIODE has been designed by…

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1946

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out a structured meta‐methodology, named DIODE, for the ethical assessment of new and emerging technologies. DIODE has been designed by a mixture of academics, governmental people and commercial practitioners. It is designed to help diverse organisations and individuals conduct ethical assessments of new and emerging technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework discussion paper was developed for consultation to ensure that DIODE addresses fundamental ethical concerns, has appropriate and manageable scope and is comprehensive in its ethical compass. The resulting DIODE meta‐methodology uses flowcharts and templates, encompassing the use of diverse tools and techniques.

Findings

There are two different angles for the ethical assessment of new technologies; a strategic/abstract angle and a project/application specific angle. DIODE includes two channels to accommodate this distinction. Early stage testing yielded positive feedback and mostly favourable comment. Additional guidance materials are being developed in response to the feedback.

Practical implications

Without training and guidance, it is difficult for technologists to take ethical concerns into account during the development and deployment of new technologies. DIODE can provide that training and guidance through a practical meta‐methodology which should help ICT professionals, policy makers and academics.

Originality/value

There is very little structured methodology material available on the ethical assessment of new technologies. The depth and sophistication contained in DIODE is therefore believed to be unique. DIODE provides practical help while remaining rooted in the philosophical and theoretical concepts of ethics.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Philippe Aurier and Béatrice Siadou‐Martin

This paper aims to investigate the role of perceived justice in service consumption/purchase experiences.

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3362

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of perceived justice in service consumption/purchase experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

In an initial study, using the critical incident method, the authors show that customers are strongly concerned by perceived injustice. Their judgments involve the three components of justice described in organizational and service marketing literature: distributive, procedural and interactional justice. They also identify a macro‐level justice factor which characterizes the perception of collective practices at the industry level. In an experiment applied to the dining experience, the authors manipulate distributive, procedural and interactional justice perception to study their impact on service evaluation (quality, value), satisfaction and relationship quality (trust, commitment).

Findings

Contrary to the satisfaction literature, the authors observe a slight direct effect of justice on satisfaction, but rather indirect impacts through perceived quality (outcome and interaction) and value. Moreover, perception of justice has substantial effects on trust (credibility and benevolence) but not on commitment.

Originality/value

The paper studies the impact of justice in the context of a customer experience evaluation (service delivery) which is not limited to service recovery. It examines the entire evaluation process, including service evaluation (quality, value), satisfaction and relationship quality (trust, commitment).

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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