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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Yair Holtzman and Margot Puerta

891

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Yair Holtzman, Margot Puerta and Harold Lazarus

694

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Hal Lazarus and Tom McManus

In this interview, Tom McManus and Dr Harold Lazarus explore transparency as both an approach and an outcome in the management of organizations, and the relation of…

1483

Abstract

Purpose

In this interview, Tom McManus and Dr Harold Lazarus explore transparency as both an approach and an outcome in the management of organizations, and the relation of transparency to corporate strategy. The interview aims to offer context and perspective on transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing the format of an interview, the reader is introduced to transparency in general and as a management principle.

Findings

As the global economy continues to become a reality, as large corporations continue to get bigger and more multinational, as information technology continues to advance, there is going to be a lot of stakeholder dispute around issues related to transparency in the coming years. Stakeholders such as customers, shareholders, and voters are holding management accountable. Information matters, and stakeholders have access to an unprecedented quantity and quality of information. Practical application of transparency is not simple, and many qualified and interesting people are developing the field.

Originality/value

Transparency is often talked about as a remedy for corruption and criminality. This interview explores a component of transparency that has not received the same attention – transparency as a principle in management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norman Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born, Harold Lazarus and ASIMP Working Group on Healthcare Transparency

Healthcare is an ever‐growing segment of the American economy. Transparency facilitates better decision‐making and better outcomes measures. The purpose of this paper is…

3442

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is an ever‐growing segment of the American economy. Transparency facilitates better decision‐making and better outcomes measures. The purpose of this paper is to present the human and economic results of increasing transparency.

Design/methodology/approach

The ASIMP Working Group on Healthcare Transparency represents a diverse yet conscilient group of practitioners, researchers, regulators, economists, and academics. Given the need for re‐envisioning healthcare to include more accountability, evidence of efficacy and transparency, this integrative medicine (ASIMP) working group is suitable to address the above purpose.

Findings

Substantial opportunity exists to reduce morbidity and mortality, suffering and excess death, unnecessary costs and risks. Greater transparency facilitates the transition to safer, more effective, more humane healthcare.

Research limitations/implications

This paper starts from a need to improve clinical outcomes and value for resources devoted. Best efforts of a national working group are presented. The implications of the report, when tested, will determine the enduring value of this work.

Practical implications

Consumers and business, administrators and practitioners can improve care at lower cost by increasing transparency. This will accelerate the diffusion of effective approaches that are not yet in widespread use despite replication of efficacy.

Originality/value

This is the first time an integrative approach has been compared with conventional healthcare models, particularly with regard to the role of transparency in healthcare management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Harold Lazarus and Richard Davis

The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of organic management and demonstrate how it can be applied in practice.

490

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of organic management and demonstrate how it can be applied in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an interview with Rich Davis, a visionary executive.

Findings

Richard Davis is an extremely creative manager who transformed a small, mediocre firm into a large, superbly well‐managed company. Originating as a family retail optical business, today nearly 35 million people enjoy the many benefits of Davis Vision. Your opinions about management, leadership, employees and business problems will never be quite the same after considering the ideas of this master of wholistic, organic, integrative management. For example, associates are considered internal customers and must be delighted first, even before external customers. Associates interact in measurable and effective ways that allows the company to focus on its vision, mission, and goals while embracing a constantly changing environment and grow.

Originality/value

The great wisdom of Richard Davis has been distilled into a very few pages. It is as if the major works of Peter Drucker were so distilled. The editors suggest that you read and reread this short piece.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Tom McManus, Yair Holtzman and Harold Lazarus

485

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Yoon R. Lee and Harold Lazarus

Summarizes the findings of a survey dealing with business meetingpractices in giant Korean corporations. Describes both meeting practicesin very large Korean firms and…

Abstract

Summarizes the findings of a survey dealing with business meeting practices in giant Korean corporations. Describes both meeting practices in very large Korean firms and also top Korean executives′ feelings about those meetings. Korean executives consider adequate preparation, clearly‐set objectives, agreement on follow‐up actions, and starting on time as the most important elements for a successful meeting. However, these elements are not being implemented adequately. Business meeting practices in Korea have room for improvement, both in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. There is also a huge disparity between the perception of the need for training in meetings management and the implementation of such training. Executive development programmes in Korea should certainly include far more training in meetings management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Joseph P. Cangemi, Bill Burga, Harold Lazarus, Richard L. Miller and Jaime Fitzgerald

No one would argue that leaders have a myriad of significant responsibilities. Using a premise the authors support – leadership is a people business – they aim to utilize…

2767

Abstract

Purpose

No one would argue that leaders have a myriad of significant responsibilities. Using a premise the authors support – leadership is a people business – they aim to utilize their more than 100 years combined leadership to answer the question: what, then, is the real work of the leader?

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative based on over 100 years of leadership and consultation on leadership with a wide variety of organizations.

Findings

The result is the eight roles of the leader, which are as follows: collaborative developer of mission, vision, and organizational core values; creator of a humanistic work environment; developer of people, builder of capabilities; Initiator of organization‐wide communications; role model of emotional intelligence; utilizer of strategic data; consensus seeker – risk taker; change agent.

Practical implications

The paper discusses each of the roles of the leader in some detail, using a model developed for this purpose. The paper does not attempt to deal with the production, product quality, financial, etc. responsibilities of the leader, only what the authors feel is the principal focus of leadership – the people.

Originality/value

The authors are leaders with over 100 years combined leadership experience. Some are leading theorists and practitioners as well. Defining exactly what is leadership has been a persistent problem for researchers and theorists. Discovering how to create or produce leaders likewise has been a difficult challenge over the years. This paper provides a model that encompasses both challenges to answer the fundamental question, what is the real work of the leader?

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Tom McManus, Johan Anderberg and Harold Lazarus

To show that retirement is no longer a given, but that not being able to retire may not be a bad thing. Remaining in the workforce might end up being a win‐win situation.

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Abstract

Purpose

To show that retirement is no longer a given, but that not being able to retire may not be a bad thing. Remaining in the workforce might end up being a win‐win situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The reader is given an introduction of some of the issues related to retirement, such as demographic, economic, and legal factors. The article discusses how these and other factors affect our ability to retire at 65. Some of the positive aspects of not retiring, including better physical and mental health for the individual and a stronger society, are also introduced.

Findings

Retirement as we know it is very likely to soon be a thing of the past. Changes in demographic, economic, and legal factors are forcing us to look at retirement from a different point of view. Studies have shown that people who remain in the workforce at an older age are better off, both physically and mentally. In addition to improved health, being an active contributor to the community will serve the society as a whole.

Practical implications

The article can serve as an eye‐opener to some people who take retirement for granted. It can also help people that fear not being able to retire, to look more favorably upon the fact that they may have to work additional years before retiring.

Originality/value

Instead of only discussing the negative aspects of an aging population, the authors take a different approach and present no retirement as an opportunity, not a problem. Don't fear it, prepare for it.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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