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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Benoit Bourguignon, Harold Boeck and Thomas Brashear Alejandro

Salespeople are at the forefront of the external environment where they act as the first responders to critical events and their resulting business turbulence. How the…

Abstract

Purpose

Salespeople are at the forefront of the external environment where they act as the first responders to critical events and their resulting business turbulence. How the salesforce responds to turbulence is, therefore, of great interest both theoretically and in practice. The paper aims to rekindle interest in agility selling, which is the most adequate behavioral sales model to exploit environmental uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

An organizational autoethnography complemented with data from in-depth interviews with key salespeople involved in turbulence resulted in the development of eight case studies.

Findings

Salespeople use agility selling through four possible responsive roles. They amplify, innovate, cooperate or mitigate turbulence to exploit its ensuing opportunity or minimize its negative effect for both the supplier and the customer. The article enhances the agility selling model by putting three core abilities in the forefront: (1) forecasting turbulence from critical events, (2) responding to changes quickly and adequately and (3) exploiting changes as opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The article argues that critical events are the cause of the turbulence that the salesforce must deal with before it hits the dyad. Agility selling represents an untapped research opportunity in business-to-business sales, and sales management, as well as within the overall agile organization.

Practical implications

Sales organizations would greatly benefit in implementing training of agility selling’s core abilities because responsiveness is a valuable tool for salespeople in times of turbulence.

Originality/value

The study is the first to empirically demonstrate the existence of agility selling.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Harold Boeck and Samuel Fosso Wamba

The aim of this paper is to understand why a collaborative innovation, such as radio‐frequency identification (RFID) technology, engenders seemingly opposite buyer‐seller…

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5295

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand why a collaborative innovation, such as radio‐frequency identification (RFID) technology, engenders seemingly opposite buyer‐seller relationship reactions among members of a supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers carried out a three year exploratory multiple case study using the grounded theory approach through participant‐observation and collaborative action research. The research project culminated in a fully functional RFID proof of concept solution which involved multiple layers of a retail supply chain. The researchers chose the retail industry for the study because it provided the ideal conditions to answer the research question.

Findings

The results highlight the role of supplier‐buyer relationships as both crucial antecedents that shape RFID infrastructure and the consequence of RFID implementation. Specifically, the impact on and of eight key dimensions was considered, namely communication and information sharing, cooperation, trust, commitment, relationship value, power imbalance and interdependence, adaptation, and conflict. The paper also positions open‐loop RFID projects as supply chain inter‐organizational systems and presents a model to analyze such initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of methodology has provided the insight necessary to answer the research question. Other researchers are encouraged to validate these findings through replication with other case studies or through quantitative data to reach analytical and statistical generalizability. The authors also encourage future research on this topic in other industries.

Originality/value

As more supply chains move forward with collaborative RFID initiatives, it is important that these companies be aware of the strategic role of supplier‐buyer relationships as both crucial antecedents that shape RFID infrastructure and a consequence of RFID implementation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Harold Boeck, Ygal Bendavid and Elisabeth Lefebvre

The purpose of this paper is to explore a central issue in industrial marketing, namely the buyer‐seller relationship, by focusing on how its development influences and is…

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5083

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a central issue in industrial marketing, namely the buyer‐seller relationship, by focusing on how its development influences and is influenced by the use of B2B e‐commerce strategies. More specifically, the paper aims at identifying what kinds of B2B electronic interactions are imposed by influential buyers; exploring the link between these electronic interactions and the buyer‐seller relationship; and seeing how influential buyers and SME suppliers adapt their own strategies in this online environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi‐case study methodology was used to allow for rich data collection and analysis and to support the discovery of patterns.

Findings

The results indicate that large buyers use specific e‐commerce processes and tools for the different relationships they have with their SME suppliers. The latter must adapt to these requirements to attain the next relationship level or risk forfeiting their established position. When a supplier reaches the new level, other requirements arise, forcing it to continuously adapt its e‐commerce strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The model proposed in this paper can serve as a tool to align B2B e‐commerce strategies and buyer‐seller relationship levels.

Practical implications

Some SME suppliers have developed a competitive advantage by going through this cycle faster than their competitors. The following relationship stages were observed: pre‐relationship, spot relationship and contractual relationship. Interestingly, there was no collaboration stage in the relationships studied.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to an understanding of the link between electronic interactions and the buyer‐seller relationship. Its information is particularly relevant to organizations that transact or plan on transacting electronically with clients or suppliers in a B2B setting.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Ygal Bendavid, Harold Boeck and Richard Philippe

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of a hospital nursing unit that has evaluated and approved a two‐bin “e‐kanban” replenishment system based on passive…

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4451

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of a hospital nursing unit that has evaluated and approved a two‐bin “e‐kanban” replenishment system based on passive high frequency radio‐frequency identification (RFID) technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study analysis is based on both qualitative and quantitative data that were collected using semi‐structured interviews, on‐site observations and experience from previous implementations. The data and simulation analysis presented in this paper were validated by key respondents thereby increasing their reliability.

Findings

Results indicate that implementing the e‐kanban RFID solution in conjunction with the redesign of the ward floor and of the roles and functions can substantially improve business and operational performance. The most important benefits for the hospital are derived from the time saved from non‐value‐added activities that can be transferred to patient care activities and the significant reduction of on‐hand inventory at distributed storage locations. The solution is considered an alternative that requires less initial investment than RFID‐enabled cabinets used in the replenishment of consignment and high‐value supplies in operating rooms and cardiac catheterization laboratories.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to conduct further research on RFID supply chain management (SCM) applications in the healthcare sector as this area holds a great potential for performance improvements. Additionally, there is a need to conduct more in‐depth research into the isolated impact of RFID technology in comparison to the change management and process redesign that it generates. One key limitation of this research is the case study approach based on a single case. This paper, therefore provides direction for practitioners on how to assess RFID's potential impact in the healthcare supply chain.

Originality/value

While most of the research on RFID in healthcare sector focuses on active RFID technology for asset management, this research presents a novel RFID application and contributes to our understanding of RFID's potential in intra‐organizational SCM processes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

John Fernie

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325

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Samuel Fosso Wamba, Joseph Barjis and Akemi Takeoka Chatfield

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1214

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2019

Sunday C. Eze, Vera C. Chinedu-Eze, Adenike Oluyemi Bello, Henry Inegbedion, Tony Nwanji and Festus Asamu

The popularity and use of mobile marketing technologies or devices have led to significant interest from researchers and practitioners, particularly in small- and…

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1006

Abstract

Purpose

The popularity and use of mobile marketing technologies or devices have led to significant interest from researchers and practitioners, particularly in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), where these technologies offer significant benefits to SMEs given the poor human capital and financial constraints encountered. The use of mobile marketing devices assists SMEs to boost their sales promotion strategies which aim at increasing the sales of their products and services. However, there has been limited focus on developing a suitable framework that enables the evaluation and shared an understanding of the factors influencing the adoption of mobile marketing technology by service SMEs in Nigeria. Therefore, this paper aims to develop a theoretically grounded framework for exploring these factors and explaining their impact on mobile marketing technology adoption in SMEs in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and used both unstructured and semi-structured interviews with a total of 26 participants drawn purposively from NIJA database in Nigeria. Thematic analysis was deployed in analysing the data.

Findings

The study developed an extended technology organisation environment (TOE) framework by incorporating the value anticipation context which helped to unveil 16 key factors influencing mobile marketing technology adoption in service SMEs in Nigeria. The finding revealed that factors associated with the extended TOE framework have an impact on SMEs mobile le marketing technology adoption but at different levels.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study emerged because of the use of qualitative methodologies about the research design, rigour in the collection and management of the large volume of the raw data, the data analysis and the credibility of the findings. This may lead to unforeseen respondent and research bias in the data analysis, which may lead to a limited understanding of alternatives and insights into the factors influencing the adoption of mobile marketing. Hence, other measures and approaches such as case study and mix-method could be deployed to validate the findings further. Also, one of the limitations of qualitative study has been the issue of theoretical generalizability of the framework. The generalizability of the formwork needs to be established across a broader range of the population. Future studies may apply confirmatory statistical techniques to test and ascertain the validity and reliability of the framework across a broader population of mobile marketing technology adopters in Nigeria. Such studies may be used as a benchmark for the theoretical constructs and the factors that may lead to the success or failure of mobile marketing technology adoption.

Originality/value

The study had further enriched TOE framework and provided an analytical dimension for exploring the adoption of mobile marketing technology. It also demonstrates the capacity to provide a reliable explanation of the factors and serves as a tool for evaluating the benefits or challenges of mobile marketing technology adoption in SMEs in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

André Richelieu and Christèle Boulaire

In the post modern era, a product or service has four potential representations: experiential; social; democratic; and an element of an organisation, a network or a…

Abstract

In the post modern era, a product or service has four potential representations: experiential; social; democratic; and an element of an organisation, a network or a universe. This paper looks at post modern product representations in the sports industry that are supported by marketing decisions. These decisions could provide guidelines to sports managers who want to strengthen the emotional connection between the team and the fans.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Anne Fennimore

This paper aims to examine two underexplored topics in organizations, i.e. vulnerable narcissists in organizational settings and possible effects of territorial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine two underexplored topics in organizations, i.e. vulnerable narcissists in organizational settings and possible effects of territorial infringements among vulnerable narcissistic employees. The movie, Office Space, illustrates prototypical employee behavior mixed with comedically maladaptive personalities in a modern organizational context. However, the arson committed by character, Milton Waddams, suggests that some employees, especially those with disordered personalities, might violently respond to perceived territorial infringements.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper combines personality factors with territorial behavior to examine employee reactions to perceived injustices. Theoretical and practical implications are offered, as well as future research directions.

Findings

The argument presented suggests that the vulnerable narcissists may initiate destructive behavior in organizations with ego threats like territorial infringements. While anger is a natural defensive reaction, vulnerable narcissists are more likely to behave aggressively toward perceived territorial infringements due to their general negative affect.

Practical implications

Employees may react to infringement over seemingly subjective things; thus, managers must understand the nature of ownership by addressing territorial claims. Managers must remain cognizant that some disordered personalities are prone toward fulfilling threats, including organizational sabotage, deviance and white-collar crime. Environmental conditions can also compound the negative behavior of personalities like vulnerable narcissists in the workplace.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper adds to the organizational behavior literature and contributes to the fields of psychology and territoriality by exploring vulnerable narcissists in organizational settings and by considering the magnitude of defensive behavior toward perceived infringements.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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