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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2013

Michael Saar and Helena Arthur‐Okor

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate how effectively the library meets the research needs of deaf and hard of hearing students.

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate how effectively the library meets the research needs of deaf and hard of hearing students. Design/methodology/approach – The study was conducted by an anonymous survey investigating students' use, awareness and comfort level with the library and its resources. The survey was followed up with a small focus group comprised of volunteer deaf and hard of hearing students in the Deaf Studies and Deaf Education program at Lamar University. Findings – A variety of communication options should be available for deaf and hard of hearing patrons to contact librarians for assistance. Librarians need to establish clear and effective lines of communication to ensure these patrons are aware of library services relevant to their needs. Making the effort to establish communication with deaf and hard of hearing patrons encourages their use of the library by demonstrating that the library is interested in serving their needs. Research limitations/implications – This is a review of the literature concerning collaboration and cannot contain every example of library and writing center collaboration. Practical implications – Librarians can use the findings in this article to create a more welcoming environment for their deaf and hard of hearing patrons. Originality/value – There is a scarcity in the library literature of studies examining the research needs of deaf and hard of hearing patrons. This article is of value to librarians looking for ways to better meet these patrons' research needs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Christy M. Borders, Stacey Jones Bock, Karla Giese, Stephanie Gardiner-Walsh and Kristi M. Probst

The world revolves around sound. Children who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) lack access to sound, thus need careful monitoring and planning to ensure they have access to…

Abstract

The world revolves around sound. Children who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) lack access to sound, thus need careful monitoring and planning to ensure they have access to adequate language models and supports to develop a strong language foundation. It is this foundation that is needed to ensure D/HH children are able to achieve developmental and academic milestones. Research is emerging to suggest specific intervention strategies that can be used to support D/HH children from birth throughout their educational career. In this chapter, we highlight several strategies that can be used to support communication, language, academic, and social/emotional growth. We freely admit that this is in no way a comprehensive and exhaustive list, but rather only scratches the surface. The field of deaf education and related research and technology is constantly changing. To ensure adequate educational access, it is highly recommended that a professional specialized in hearing loss be a part of the educational team any time a child is identified as having any degree or type of hearing loss.

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Viewpoints on Interventions for Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-089-1

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Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2016

Christy M. Borders, Stephanie Gardiner-Walsh, Molly Herman and Molly Turner

Inclusion of deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) students is more common than ever before. General education teachers need to be aware of strengths and needs of this particular…

Abstract

Inclusion of deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) students is more common than ever before. General education teachers need to be aware of strengths and needs of this particular group of students as well as have a few simple strategies to implement in the classroom. This chapter will present strengths and needs relative to language, social/emotional skills, and literacy. Language modalities, educational philosophies, as well as assistive listening technologies are discussed. We will further present important information on changes in technology and support personnel that may be used to improve the education of D/HH students.

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General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Impact on Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-541-6

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Arzu Deveci Topal, Esra Çoban Budak and Aynur Kolburan Geçer

The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of algorithm teaching on the problem-solving skills of deaf-hard hearing students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of algorithm teaching on the problem-solving skills of deaf-hard hearing students.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, a pre-test and post-test problem-solving scale was applied to the single group (16 deaf-hard hearing students at a secondary school level) that had received algorithm education. Pre-test and post-test results were compared in order to see whether there was a significant difference among students in terms of their problem-solving attitudes. Students’ levels of performing the applications were examined through observation forms and their opinions about algorithm teaching were received.

Findings

As a result of the research, it was determined that implemented algorithm teaching had a significant effect on improving the problem-solving skills of the students.

Originality/value

Scratch training can be administered as either a compulsory or an optional course for hearing students as the Scratch programme offers the opportunity of teaching algorithmic reasoning with games, making the courses entertaining and giving students the chance to create their own designs which helps to improve their creative problem-solving skills and their motivation accordingly. Scratch teaching can be beneficial in developing students’ problem-solving behaviours and creativity.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Susan Gilbert Beck

Beck discusses the need to improve library and information services for the deaf community. The technological support available to libraries to serve the deaf is…

Abstract

Beck discusses the need to improve library and information services for the deaf community. The technological support available to libraries to serve the deaf is identified and described. Turnkey systems are found to be lacking in applications devoted to those who cannot hear or who are hard of hearing. Other technologies, like captioned videos, TDDs, and assistive listening systems, are examined for levels of service and excellence as well as cost. Examples of technology in transition and for the future are offered, along with experiments on speech and sound. These include inner ear implants, the “data glove” experiments, and tactile translators. Technological conflicts that may arise due to one person having multiple disabilities are presented with a discussion on the prevention of dangerous or difficult situations. Possible difficulties and ways to handle opposing technologies are examined briefly. Appropriate sections of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Guidelines are grouped with the technologies that aid compliance. Additional laws are mentioned where their inclusion is appropriate. Suggested guidelines for serving the deaf/disabled community are offered for librarians working in all library types.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Christy M. Borders, Molly Herman, Karla Giese and Anna Tess

Hearing loss impacts language and communication, a building block for relationships and society. Most teachers and professionals rarely have a young child with hearing

Abstract

Hearing loss impacts language and communication, a building block for relationships and society. Most teachers and professionals rarely have a young child with hearing loss in their classroom. The “unknown” can be a source of stress for the professionals and the families alike. Understanding the characteristics of this population of students, the diagnostic process, the possible early intervention supports, and practices to use with young children with hearing loss may help teachers and professionals approach students and families with more confidence. This chapter will outline each of the aforementioned with an emphasis on understanding parental perspective.

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Special Education for Young Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-041-3

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Christina M. Borders, Molly Herman, Kristi Probst and Molly Turner

General education and special education teachers may have limited experience working with students who are deaf/hard of hearing and be unaware of the professionals and…

Abstract

General education and special education teachers may have limited experience working with students who are deaf/hard of hearing and be unaware of the professionals and specialist who may work with those students. When a student has a hearing loss, there are a variety of additional professionals with whom teachers must collaborate. The roles of these professionals may be different than those experienced by other educators. An understanding of the roles of these various professionals is important to ensuring the most appropriate service provision for students with hearing loss. This chapter will specifically discuss the roles of teachers of the deaf, interpreters, and audiologists as well as some other related service providers within the context of a fictional case scenario.

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Interdisciplinary Connections to Special Education: Key Related Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-663-8

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Tracey Sharp

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the level of hearing loss in the population and describe the joint health and social care response in Hartlepool to the needs of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the level of hearing loss in the population and describe the joint health and social care response in Hartlepool to the needs of this group of people.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach included a review of the literature, the application of national prevalence tables to local population estimates, and a review of the adequacy of current service provision available to people with a hearing loss.

Findings

More than 14,700 people out of a total population of 91,000 living in Hartlepool are estimated to have some degree of hearing loss. This compares with only 1,046 people registered with the adult social care team although 13,800 people were found to be registered with the local audiology department. The review found that a broad range of services was already in place across health and social care although some areas were identified for service improvement which are currently being addressed.

Originality/value

Drawing attention to the needs of a section of the community that is virtually invisible, this review served to highlight the scale of hearing loss prevalence in the population, to estimate the number of people with hearing loss in a local population using data that has been available for almost two decades (although not widely adopted), and demonstrates a unique cross‐sectoral approach to assessing and responding to the needs of people who have a loss of hearing.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Christy M. Borders, Marcus Daczewitz and Kristi M. Probst

Transition is an important and ongoing aspect of life that everyone experiences. For students who are deaf/hard of hearing (d/DHH) and their families, transitions related…

Abstract

Transition is an important and ongoing aspect of life that everyone experiences. For students who are deaf/hard of hearing (d/DHH) and their families, transitions related to education can be daunting and, at times, confusing. This chapter will focus on three important educational transitions: early intervention, school age, and adulthood. For each transitional period, recommendations for best practices are made. Additionally, this chapter will discuss the importance of transition planning and supports over time. Overall, communication between service providers, families, and the student is a key element to making these transitions smooth and successful.

Details

Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

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