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1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Saurabh Chandra, Rajiv K. Srivastava and Yogesh Agarwal

The ocean transportation of automobiles is carried out by specialized Roll‐on/Roll‐off ships, which are designed to carry a large number of automobiles at a time. Many of…

Abstract

Purpose

The ocean transportation of automobiles is carried out by specialized Roll‐on/Roll‐off ships, which are designed to carry a large number of automobiles at a time. Many of these shipping companies have vertically integrated or collaborated with other logistics services providers to offer integrated maritime logistics solution to car manufacturers. The purpose of this study is to develop an optimization model to address the tactical level maritime logistics planning for such a company.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem is formulated as a mixed integer linear program and we propose an iterative combined Ant colony and linear programming‐based solution technique for the same.

Findings

This paper can integrate the maritime transportation planning of internally managed cargoes with the inventory management at the loading and discharging ports to minimize supply‐chain cost and also maximize additional revenue through optional cargoes using same fleet of ships.

Research limitations/implications

The mathematical model does not consider the variability in production and consumption of products across various locations, travel times between different nodes, etc.

Practical implications

The suggested mathematical model to the supply‐chain planning problem and solution technique can be considered in the development of decision support system for operations planning.

Originality/value

This paper extends the maritime inventory routing model by considering simultaneous planning of optional cargoes with internally managed cargoes.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Thomas J. Maronick

To examine the impact of Baltimore, Maryland USA festival market called Harbor Place on area residents' shopping, dining, and entertainment behavior over a 23‐year period.

2009

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the impact of Baltimore, Maryland USA festival market called Harbor Place on area residents' shopping, dining, and entertainment behavior over a 23‐year period.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study utilizing a telephone survey of a random sample of Baltimore area residents in 1982, 1992, and 2005.

Findings

A significant decline in shopping for non‐food items at Harbor Place and the Inner Harbor after the initial excitement following the opening of Harbor Place in 1980. A substantial and stable percentage of area residents visited the Inner Harbor and Harbor Place in each wave of the study for dining and entertainment purposes.

Practical implications

The festival market attracts the recreational shopper/shopper tourist but is likely to attract the convenience shopper as more residential development occurs in areas adjacent to the Inner Harbor. The area is likely to continue attracting area residents for dining and entertainment.

Originality/value

The paper compares and discusses data about Baltimore's festival market areas for the past 23 years and shows that Baltimore area residents, like those in most cities, are more likely to patronize their suburban shopping malls and power centers, rather than downtown market places.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Dennis C. Hensley

The NASD has had a rule in place governing underwriting compensation, but with the expanded pace and types of services available, defining what falls into this category…

Abstract

The NASD has had a rule in place governing underwriting compensation, but with the expanded pace and types of services available, defining what falls into this category has proven problematic. Thus the NASD has proposed a new rule, the roots of which are discussed in this article. Also this proposed Rule 2710 is compared and contrasted with the old rule. There is also a very thorough discussion of safe harbors that might be relied on.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1972

L.J. Salmon, L.J. Sachs and L.J. Buckley

July 29, 1971 Docks — Port Talbot — “Dock estate” — Meaning — New harbour and jetty built adjacent to old harbour — Whether part of port of Port Talbot — “Dock work” …

Abstract

July 29, 1971 Docks — Port Talbot — “Dock estate” — Meaning — New harbour and jetty built adjacent to old harbour — Whether part of port of Port Talbot — “Dock work” — “Discharging from ship” — Discharging ore involving work with unloaders and belt conveyor system — “Cargo” — Meaning — Dock Labour Scheme for the South Wales Ports (1942) App. (4) — Port of Port Talbot Registration Amended Scheme (1943) Sch. para. l(l)(a) — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) Act, 1946 (9 & 10 Geo. VI, c.22), s. 6 — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) (Amendment) Order, 1967 (S. 1. 1967, No. 1252), Sch. 2, App. 1M(4).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Stuart J. Kaswell, Alan Rosenblat and Michael L. Sherman

To describe and analyze in detail an Interpretive Release (the “2006 Interpretation”) approved on July 12, 2006 by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe and analyze in detail an Interpretive Release (the “2006 Interpretation”) approved on July 12, 2006 by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) regarding the soft dollar safe harbor under Section 28(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief discussion of the history of soft dollars, describes and analyzes in greater detail relevant aspects of the 2006 Interpretation, including an explanation of the three‐part test concerning the use of soft dollars to pay for products and services under the safe harbor, a discussion of “mixed use” items, further detail on soft dollar arrangements, an explanation of liabilities and obligations of managers and broker dealers, and an implementation timeline.

Findings

Under the 2006 Interpretation, a money manager may rely on the safe harbor to acquire products or services only upon satisfaction of each part of a three‐part test. First, does the product or service meet the eligibility criteria of Section 28(e)(3)? Second, does the eligible product or service provide lawful and appropriate assistance in the performance of relevant responsibilities? Finally, may the money manager properly conclude, in good faith, that the commissions paid are reasonable in relation to the value of the research and brokerage products and services provided by the broker (in relation either to the particular transaction or to the money manager's overall responsibilities with respect to discretionary accounts)? The 2006 Interpretation also is relevant to broker‐dealers who may receive soft dollars. Under Section 28(e), a money manager can pay soft dollars only to broker‐dealers who “provide” research or brokerage services and “effect” transactions. Under the 2006 Interpretation, the circumstances under which broker‐dealers will be seen as “providing” services and “effecting” transactions will be interpreted more broadly than under past interpretations, allowing brokers and money managers greater flexibility to structure soft dollar and commission‐sharing arrangements in a manner that will better serve the interests of investors.

Originality/value

Provides a detailed analysis of the 2006 Interpretation concerning soft dollars.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Elizabeth Anne Shotton

The harbours of Ireland, under threat from deterioration and rising sea levels, are being documented using terrestrial LiDAR augmented by archival research to develop…

93

Abstract

Purpose

The harbours of Ireland, under threat from deterioration and rising sea levels, are being documented using terrestrial LiDAR augmented by archival research to develop comprehensive histories and timeline models for public dissemination. While methods to extract legible three-dimensional models from scan data have been developed and such operational formats for heritage management are imperative, the need for this format in interpretive visualisations should be reconsidered. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretive visualisations are forms of history making, where factual evidence is drawn together with conjecture to illustrate a plausible account of events, and differentiation between fact and conjecture is the key to their intellectual transparency. A procedure for superimposing conjectural reconstructions, generated using Rhinoceros and CloudCompare, on original scan data in Cyclone and visualised on a web-based viewer is discussed.

Findings

Embellishing scan data with conjectural elements to visualise the evolution of harbours is advantageous for both research and public dissemination. The accuracy and density of the scans enables the interrogation of the harbour form and the irregular details, the latter in danger of generalisation if translated into parametric or mesh format. Equally, the ethereal quality of the point cloud conveys a sense of tentativeness, consistent with a provisional hypothesis. Finally, coding conjectural elements allows users to intuit the difference between fact and historical narrative.

Originality/value

While various web-based point clouds viewers are used to disseminate research, the novelty here is the potential to develop didactic representations using point clouds that successfully capture a provisional thesis regarding each harbour’s evolution in an intellectually transparent manner to enable further inquiry.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Carolyn Sissoko

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the consequences of the “safe harbor” provisions of the US Bankruptcy Code that were enacted from 1984 through 2005 and that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the consequences of the “safe harbor” provisions of the US Bankruptcy Code that were enacted from 1984 through 2005 and that protect certain financial contracts from standard bankruptcy procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods are used to evaluate whether these provisions of the Bankruptcy Code were successful in their stated goal of reducing systemic risk in the financial system. A model of systemic risk is presented verbally in order to frame the discussion.

Findings

Recent evidence indicates that the “safe harbor” provisions, in fact, destabilized the financial system by encouraging collateralized interbank lending, discouraging careful analysis of the credit risk of counterparties and increasing the risk that creditors will run on a financial firm.

Practical implications

This paper indicates that the rewriting of the Bankruptcy Code to favor financial firms has had a profoundly destabilizing effect on the financial system. To put the financial system on more secure foundations, the author proposes that large complex financial institutions be prohibited from posting collateral on over the counter derivative transactions and that the repo‐related bankruptcy amendments passed in 2005 be repealed.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an original framework for understanding systemic risk which drives the results in the paper.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

BETTY SANTANGELO and TIM O'NEAL LORAH

The blurring of the lines between banks, insurance companies and broker‐dealers continues. As we go to press, yet another merger has been announced. The application of the…

Abstract

The blurring of the lines between banks, insurance companies and broker‐dealers continues. As we go to press, yet another merger has been announced. The application of the Anti‐Money Laundering Act of 1992 to the securities industry becomes more and more obvious. This article explores the act with particular attention to the safe harbor, which exists to encourage banks (financial institutions) to report suspicious activity while hopefully falling under the protection of the Act, so as not to be exposed to civil liability.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1973

Reid, Morris of Borth‐y‐Gest, Hodson, Simon of Glaisdale and Cross of Chelsea

December 13, 1972 Docks — Port Talbot — “Dock estate” — Meaning — New harbour and jetty built adjacent to old harbour — Whether part of port of Port Talbot — “Dock work” …

Abstract

December 13, 1972 Docks — Port Talbot — “Dock estate” — Meaning — New harbour and jetty built adjacent to old harbour — Whether part of port of Port Talbot — “Dock work” — Discharging ore involving work with unloaders and belt conveyor system — Work not previously performed by registered dock workers — “Cargo” — “Discharging from ship” — Meanings — Dock Labour Scheme for the South Wales Ports (1942) App. (4) — Port of Port Talbot Registration Amended Scheme (1943) Sch. para. 1(1)(a) — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) Act, 1946 (9 & 10 Geo. VI, c.22), s. 6 — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) (Amendment) Order, 1967 (S. 1. 1967, No. 1252), Sch. 2, App. 1M(4).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Rachel Kappler and Arduizur Carli Richie-Zavaleta

Human trafficking (HT) is a local, national and international problem with a range of human rights, public health and policy implications. Victims of HT face atrocious…

Abstract

Purpose

Human trafficking (HT) is a local, national and international problem with a range of human rights, public health and policy implications. Victims of HT face atrocious abuses that negatively impact their health outcomes. When a state lacks protective laws, such as Safe Harbor laws, victims of HT tend to be seen as criminals. This paper aims to highlight the legal present gaps within Missouri’s anti-trafficking legislation and delineates recommendations for the legal protection of victims of HT and betterment of services needed for their reintegration and healing.

Design/methodology/approach

This case-study is based on a policy analysis of current Missouri’s HT laws. This analysis was conducted through examining current rankings systems created by nationally and internationally recognized non-governmental organizations as well as governmental reports. Additionally, other state’s best practice and law passage of Safe Harbor legislations were examined. The recommendations were based on human rights and public health frameworks.

Findings

Missouri is a state that has yet to upgrade its laws lately to reflect Safe Harbor laws. Constant upgrades and evaluations of current efforts are necessary to protect and address HT at the state and local levels. Public health and human rights principles can assist in the upgrading of current laws as well as other states’ best-practice and integration of protective legislation and diversion programs to both youth and adult victims of HT.

Research limitations/implications

Laws are continually being updated at the state level; therefore, there might be some upgrades that have taken place after the analysis of this case study was conducted. Also, the findings and recommendations of this case study are limited to countries that are similar to the USA in terms of the state-level autonomy to pass laws independently from federal law.

Practical implications

If Safe Harbor laws are well designed, they have greater potential to protect, support and assist victims of HT in their process from victimization into survivorship as well as to paving the way for societal reintegration. The creation and enforcement of Safe Harbor laws is a way to ensure the decriminalization process. Additionally, this legal protection also ensures that the universal human rights of victims are protected. Consequently, these legal processes and updates could assist in creating healthier communities in the long run in the USA and around the world.

Social implications

From a public health and human rights perspectives, communities in the USA and around the world cannot provide complete protection to victims of HT until their anti-trafficking laws reflect Safe Harbor laws.

Originality/value

This case study, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, is a unique analysis that dismantles the discrepancies of Missouri’s current HT laws. This work is valuable to those who create policies at the state level and advocate for the protection of victims and anti-trafficking efforts.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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