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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

André van Roon, Harrie A.J. Govers, R. John and Hans van Weenen

It is now generally accepted that most of today’s (chemical) industry is unsustainable by design. Sustainable development is gaining interest as a concept, on the basis of…

Abstract

It is now generally accepted that most of today’s (chemical) industry is unsustainable by design. Sustainable development is gaining interest as a concept, on the basis of which efforts are made to redesign production and consumption systems, in order to solve global environmental, economic and social problems. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the role of chemistry and chemistry education is changing through sustainable development. Sustainable chemistry is emerging as a new concept, but what is it? Different ideas on how to give content to sustainable chemistry have resulted in various new concepts, focussing on different levels of organisation, ranging from the level of molecules up to the societal level. After studying and comparing some of the related concepts concerned, a general definition of sustainable chemistry is presented. It is concluded that more research is needed, especially aimed at the higher levels of organisation, in order to be able to formulate a more detailed definition.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Hans van Weenen

Sustainable development is the biggest challenge to universities in the twenty‐first century. As many different definitions and interpretations of the concept exist, it is…

Abstract

Sustainable development is the biggest challenge to universities in the twenty‐first century. As many different definitions and interpretations of the concept exist, it is not surprising that the strategies of the universities that are beginning to strive for sustainability show some differences. Various universities have already become engaged in the process of integrating sustainable development in their activities. Some examples of such universities are presented, including the experiences of the University of Amsterdam. The diverging strategies of sustainable universities are classified to clarify the differences and to stimulate and advance the debate. Inevitably, management, research, education, communication and operation of any university with a genuine interest in sustainable development will have to change. However, if, as it seems, universities are deeply involved in current world‐wide patterns of unsustainability, could it perhaps be that existing university structures need to be replaced by a completely new type of “universal knowledge network” which is derived from a totally different paradigm of their role and function? In this article some clear indications are given about the meaning of sustainable development in this context in order to provide directions and guidelines for university strategies and practices. The consequences of the concept for universities are indicated and, finally, a possible model for a sustainable university is proposed.

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International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Yorick Benjamin and Hans Van Weenen

Abstract

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International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Walter Leal Filho

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Van Dong Phung, Igor Hawryszkiewycz and Daniel Chandran

Studies have examined the influence of knowledge-sharing factors on attitudes and intentions to share knowledge; thus, there is a need to add to the limited research to…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies have examined the influence of knowledge-sharing factors on attitudes and intentions to share knowledge; thus, there is a need to add to the limited research to examine individuals’ actual knowledge-sharing behaviour (KSB). Drawing upon the social cognitive theory (SCT) and transformational leadership, this study aims to develop a new research model which modifies the standard SCT model and augments it with other theories to examine academics’ KSBs.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire surveys based on literature and pilot study were conducted with 785 academic staff from four Vietnamese public universities. This study applied structural equation modelling to test the proposed research model and hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that environmental factors (subjective norms, trust) and personal factors (knowledge self-efficacy, enjoyment in helping others) had positive impacts on KSB; KSB had a strongly positive effect on innovative behaviour; and transformational leadership positively moderated the effects of subjective norms, trust and knowledge self-efficacy on KSB. Interestingly, psychological ownership of knowledge was found to have insignificant associations with KSB.

Practical implications

The study findings can be used by university leaders, academic staff and researchers in other similar contexts.

Originality/value

Until now, to the best of the researchers’ knowledge, no studies have applied SCT as a primary lens, in which transformational leadership positioned in a focal behaviour also affected KSB, to investigate research on KSB in organisations, especially in institutions of higher education.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Pang‐Lo Liu and Chih‐Hung Tsai

High‐tech industries in Taiwan exist in an environment with diverse product requirements and intense cost reduction and information integration stress. They must develop…

Abstract

High‐tech industries in Taiwan exist in an environment with diverse product requirements and intense cost reduction and information integration stress. They must develop new operational directions to increase industry competitiveness. Therefore, Taiwan’s high‐tech industries must continue R&D and creativity, establish knowledge sharing mechanisms and improve new product development (NPD) performance. This research analyzed and explored the influences of knowledge management (KM) and knowledge sharing mechanisms introduced by Taiwan’s high‐tech industries on new product development performance. The relationship between knowledge management capabilities and NPD performance is studied. This research considers the intervening industry and corporate position variables. Taiwan’s high‐tech industries have gradually entered the era of IT region integration and application with competitive advantage creation based upon core techniques. The in‐depth study of knowledge management and knowledge sharing introduced by the high‐tech industry revealed double meanings in academic and practical applications. The research results showed the following: (1) the stronger the knowledge management capabilities of Taiwan’s high‐tech industries, the more significant the NPD performance. (2) The better the knowledge sharing mechanism in Taiwan’s high‐tech industries, the more significant the NPD performance. (3) Corporate scale is not necessarily the critical factor in NPD success and the influence of corporate scale on NPD performance did not show significant differences. (4) The stronger the degree of leading corporate techniques, the more significant the NPD performance.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Sara Lombardi, Sara Sassetti and Vincenzo Cavaliere

Building on the attitude–behavior relationship model, this study aims to contribute to customer orientation literature by suggesting that service employees’ commitment…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the attitude–behavior relationship model, this study aims to contribute to customer orientation literature by suggesting that service employees’ commitment (i.e. personal attitude) affects their customer orientation via the effect of their participation in knowledge sharing with colleagues (i.e. employees’ behavior).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis has been developed around survey data, collected from 165 service workers of Italian museums. The hypotheses are tested through the SPSS PROCESS macro plugin.

Findings

Drawing on the importance of human capital to tourism organizations, this study illustrates that affective commitment has a positive and significant influence on employees’ customer orientation, and that this relationship is fully mediated by knowledge-sharing behaviors.

Practical implications

As attitudes are more stable than behaviors, the findings suggest that managers of tourism organizations implement appropriate selection and recruitment techniques, together with adequate involvement and empowerment activities, to identify and support individuals whose attitudes fit the organizational goals.

Originality/value

Acknowledging the contribution that workers can give to service organizations’ success, this paper enriches the understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the relationship between employees’ attitudes and their orientation toward the customer. Building on the cognitive dissonance theory, it adds to extant research on the individual antecedents of employees’ customer orientation by shedding light on the attitude–behavior relationship in tourism organizations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Luu Trong Tuan

Through an empirical inquiry into manufacturing joint ventures companies in Vietnam setting, this paper aims to examine the relationships among knowledge sharing and its…

Abstract

Purpose

Through an empirical inquiry into manufacturing joint ventures companies in Vietnam setting, this paper aims to examine the relationships among knowledge sharing and its antecedents such as organisational culture, ethics, and human resources localization.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of data returned from a questionnaire survey among middle level managers in these manufacturing joint ventures companies was conducted via analysis of variance and structural equation modelling.

Findings

The study findings display the correspondence between control culture and ethics of justice. Flexibility culture, on the other hand, tends to nurture ethics of care, which in turn positively impact localization of intellectual capital. The influence of intellectual capital localization on knowledge sharing is also discerned.

Originality/value

The study offers insight into the linkage pattern of knowledge sharing and its antecedents, organisational culture, ethics, and human resources localization, in manufacturing joint venture companies in a Vietnam business context.

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2008

Pang‐Lo Liu and Chih‐Hung Tsai

High‐tech industry has been the principal economic source for Taiwan in recent years. The characteristics of high‐tech industries in Taiwan are changeable product markets…

Abstract

High‐tech industry has been the principal economic source for Taiwan in recent years. The characteristics of high‐tech industries in Taiwan are changeable product markets, short product life cycles and high company attrition rate. In the globalization trend, the high‐tech industry has gradually increased corporate competitiveness and reached the goal of sustainable operations through knowledge management, knowledge sharing and new product research and development. Firms have aggressively strengthened and integrated their internal and external resources and enhanced knowledge sharing to increase industry operational performance. Effectively strengthening the knowledge management operation and performance evaluation of knowledge sharing in Taiwan’s high‐tech industry has become a critical issue. In the selection of knowledge sharing Key Performance Indicators (KPI), this research divided the knowledge sharing indicators into representative strategic indicators such as organizational knowledge learning, organizational knowledge resources, organizational information capacity and organizational knowledge performance through screening using Factor Analysis. The characteristics of the constructs were interdependent. This research calculated and adjusted the correlation among the key performance knowledge sharing indicators using ANP and determined the relative weight of knowledge sharing.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2018

Mohammed Laid Ouakouak and Noufou Ouedraogo

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of organizational commitment and trust on knowledge sharing and on knowledge utilization. Also, the study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of organizational commitment and trust on knowledge sharing and on knowledge utilization. Also, the study aims to examine the influence of knowledge sharing on knowledge utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study was conducted among 307 employees working at Canadian organizations.

Findings

The results reveal that both affective commitment and professional trust have positive influences on knowledge sharing and knowledge utilization, whereas personal trust and continuance commitment do not. The authors also found that business ethics moderates the relationship between knowledge sharing and knowledge utilization.

Practical implications

These findings extend the literature on knowledge management and demonstrate, from a practical perspective, that in order to build a knowledge-sharing culture, managers must create conditions that allow affective commitment, professional trust and business ethics to flourish.

Originality/value

The current study offers an initial investigation of the effects of both kinds of commitment and trust on knowledge sharing and knowledge utilization.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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