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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2020

Bart Lenderink, Johannes I.M. Halman, Hans Boes and Hans Voordijk

Stimulating innovation in projects can contribute to achieving policy goals, addressing societal challenges and meeting objectives within programs and projects. Despite…

Abstract

Purpose

Stimulating innovation in projects can contribute to achieving policy goals, addressing societal challenges and meeting objectives within programs and projects. Despite their potential, innovations are rarely included in tender assignments and evaluated in the award of civil engineering projects. One explanation for this is the perceived difficulty in triggering and objectively assessing innovations in the awarding of projects. The aim of this paper is to develop, implement and evaluated a method to encourage and assess innovations in the awarding of bridge construction projects to address this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

A design science research (DSR) approach is used to develop, implement and evaluate a method to trigger and assess innovations in tenders for bridge projects. DSR approaches are used to develop “well-tested, well-understood and well documented innovative generic designs, dealing with authentic field problems or opportunities” (van Aken et al., 2016).

Findings

The findings show that the application of the developed method in a bridge project led to the inclusion of a broad range of innovations in the tender offers. Despite the broad support for the defined criteria, there were some differences in the way the criteria were interpreted by the public procurement team and by the tenderers. Despite these differences, no legal claims were filed in court.

Practical implications

Further development and wider adoption of the method is likely to have a positive impact on the application of innovations in bridge projects. With some adjustments, the method would also be appropriate for other civil engineering and construction projects.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the discussion on how the terms innovation and innovativeness can be operationalized and used in the literature and practice. The developed method provides definitions for assessing the degree as well as the level of innovations in tenders for bridge projects. Further, it provides a way to rank innovations and determine the additional value of the offered innovations in terms of a notional reduction in tender price. Finally, it provides insights into how to encourage innovations through public procurement in civil engineering projects.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Henrico Plantinga, Hans Voordijk and André Dorée

While the need for strategic alignment in public management has been recognized, there is a lack of conceptual clarity to support its application in practice. Focusing on…

Abstract

Purpose

While the need for strategic alignment in public management has been recognized, there is a lack of conceptual clarity to support its application in practice. Focusing on the specific field of public procurement, this paper clarifies and illustrates how the concept of strategic alignment can be applied when strategizing the public procurement process.

Design/methodology/approach

The current literature on strategic alignment in public procurement is critically reviewed to identify ambiguities that hamper its application in practice. Based on this review, an analytical framework is developed that conceptualizes strategic alignment as that between the procurement instruments used in a sourcing project and the corresponding higher-level strategies. The framework is empirically illustrated by applying it in a case study that reconstructs the procurement strategy for an innovation project

Findings

Strategic alignment in the public procurement process can be demonstrated by identifying, explicating and logically linking reasoning and trade-off decisions on competing priorities across multiple levels and dimensions of strategy

Originality/value

Although creating alignment between policy and public procurement practice is generally held to be important in the public management literature, it is only discussed on high levels of abstraction. This paper provides clarity by investigating alignment in greater detail.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 33 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Marc van den Berg, Hans Voordijk and Arjen Adriaanse

The purpose of this study is to explore how demolition contractors coordinate project activities for buildings at their end-of-life. The organizations are thereby…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how demolition contractors coordinate project activities for buildings at their end-of-life. The organizations are thereby conceptualized as information processing systems facing uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study methodology was selected to gain in-depth insights from three projects with different end-of-life strategies: a faculty building (material recycling), a nursing home (component reuse) and a psychiatric hospital (element reuse). Using a theory elaboration approach, the authors sought to explain how and why demolition contractors process information for end-of-life coordination.

Findings

End-of-life strategies differ in the degree of building, workflow and environmental uncertainty posed to the demolition contractor. Whether or not a strategy is effective depends on the (mis)match between the specific levels of uncertainty and the adopted coordination mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

The explanatory account on end-of-life coordination refines information processing theory for the context of (selective) demolition projects.

Practical implications

The detailed case descriptions and information processing perspective enable practitioners to select, implement and reflect on coordination mechanisms for demolition/deconstruction projects at hand.

Originality/value

Reflecting its dual conceptual-empirical and inductive-deductive focus, this study contributes with new opportunities to explain building end-of-life coordination with a refined theory.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Henrico Plantinga, Hans Voordijk and André Dorée

The development of innovative procurement instruments can be costly and risky. To capitalize on successful innovative instruments, it is essential that these are reused…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of innovative procurement instruments can be costly and risky. To capitalize on successful innovative instruments, it is essential that these are reused. However, reuse can be problematic in project-based public client organizations. This paper aims to apply the ambidexterity concept of integration mechanisms to examine how such reuse can be facilitated.

Design/methodology/approach

An initial framework is developed to conceptualize and contextualize the ambidexterity integration mechanism for the procurement function of a multi-project public client. Concluding that, in this situation, an organizational procedure is an appropriate interpretation of the integration mechanism, a design science project is carried out to develop and implement a procedure in a real-life setting.

Findings

Reconstructed reuse patterns confirm the need to have an actionable integration mechanism implemented. Integration, in the sense of drawing benefits from successful one-off innovative procurement instruments, may fail unnoticed if not organized and deliberately managed. The procedure developed in the design science project demonstrates how such integration can be achieved.

Originality/value

Although research on ambidexterity has grown exponentially in the past decade, it is yet to be applied in the field of public procurement. Furthermore, the application of design science research is novel in this field of literature. The paper illustrates how both can help solve a relevant organizational problem.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Hans Voordijk and Ruth Sloot

With building information modeling’s increasing influence, it becomes important to analyze building information model (BIM)’s impact on users’ behavior. Therefore, the…

Abstract

Purpose

With building information modeling’s increasing influence, it becomes important to analyze building information model (BIM)’s impact on users’ behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore BIM’s influence on users’ behavior, using the innovative philosophy of technical mediation. This philosophy implies that perceptions and actions are always, to some degree, constituted and transformed by technologies. The question in this study is how the perceptions and actions of users are mediated by BIM.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework developed by Dorrestijn to assess the impacts of technology is used to explore the different types of impact that BIM has on the perceptions and actions of its users. Through a literature review, this framework is used to categorize the mediating effects of BIM. Following this, expert interviews, a workshop and user interviews explore these effects in practice.

Findings

Based on Dorrestijn’s framework, it is concluded that guidance and persuasion are important mediating effects of BIM. BIM also impacts the human decision-process through coercive pressures to implement BIM and to embody BIM through acquiring skills.

Originality/value

With the increasing influence of BIM, analyzing its impact on users’ behavior becomes increasingly relevant. This is the first study to use the technical mediation approach to analyze this impact. In this approach, humans and technologies are seen as interacting with and co-shaping each other.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Henrico Plantinga, Hans Voordijk and Andre Doree

The purpose of this paper is to show that for frequently procuring public clients: the reasoning behind the use of procurement instruments is a process in its own right…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that for frequently procuring public clients: the reasoning behind the use of procurement instruments is a process in its own right that requires managerial and scientific attention; modeling this process contributes to making sensible procurement choices; and managing this process is a relevant factor in the client’s development toward strategic procurement.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed to conceptualize the reasoning behind procurement instruments. Using this model in a case study, the reasoning behind the evolution of a particular procurement instrument as applied by a public infrastructure management organization is reconstructed.

Findings

The case study results show that an initially explicitly formulated set of main reasons for operating a qualification system can implicitly evolve over time into a different set of reasons. From a managerial point of view, explication of implicit reasons is important to both avoid the risk that the real value of the procurement instrument remains undetected as well as properly assess its strategic alignment with higher level strategies. The conceptual model proves to be a useful tool to support that.

Originality/value

Bringing the reasoning behind the use of procurement instruments to the fore, this study explores an area of construction procurement research that is positioned between the disciplines of purchasing and supply management, knowledge management and strategic management.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Julia Wijnmaalen, Hans Voordijk and Bas Rietjens

This paper aims to generate insight into the processes that lie at the heart of multiteam system (MTS) coordination and how MTS coordination develops. The four…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to generate insight into the processes that lie at the heart of multiteam system (MTS) coordination and how MTS coordination develops. The four propositions developed can set a future MTS research agenda and enable MTS leaders to increase MTS performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A military and civilian construction MTS has been studied over several months. The longitudinal character, micro-level focus and abductive research approach respond to the call for more in-depth, empirical studies of MTS processes.

Findings

Based on the research findings, four propositions are advanced: the interrelatedness of trust, communication and shared mental models is at the heart of MTS coordination; MTSs are sensitive to a downward spiral triggered by the negative relationship between MTS coordination and the occurrence of negative events; a salient component team identity accelerates this downward spiral; and effective MTS leadership is a perquisite for successful MTS coordination. The findings also indicate that because the MTS research field is still maturing, there is value in testing the degree to which existing knowledge on teams is generalizable to an MTS context.

Practical implications

The research generates three practical suggestions for MTS leaders to increase MTS performance: usual ways of structuring or leading a team might elicit intergroup behavior in MTSs, a conventional “fun” teambuilding program is not effective in an MTS situation and balance formal and informal coordination.

Originality/value

The abductive and empirical character of this study is unique in the field of MTS research. Moreover, the four propositions on MTS coordination advance current knowledge on MTS processes. Additionally, the study generates new insights that could enable MTS leaders to increase MTS performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Hans Voordijk

Argues that logistics networks in the building industry will develop in relation to transaction‐specific investments in new information technologies such as EDI and PDI…

Abstract

Argues that logistics networks in the building industry will develop in relation to transaction‐specific investments in new information technologies such as EDI and PDI. This is particularly the case where strategic considerations play a subordinate role and efficiency arguments are stressed. The limitations of the transaction cost approach are also discussed. In the building industry, logistics networks are not only directed towards a minimisation of transaction costs, but are also striving for joint value maximisation. Co‐operation between designing and constructing parties makes it possible to present a “total product” to the market. Opportunistic behaviour is replaced by mutual trust. Instead of bounded rationality, know‐how is transferred between firms for product development. This change will fundamentally alter the nature of competition in the building industry in the near future.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Arjen Adriaanse and Hans Voordijk

Although communication is of vital importance in construction projects, the construction industry is confronted with great communication difficulties and an ineffective…

Abstract

Although communication is of vital importance in construction projects, the construction industry is confronted with great communication difficulties and an ineffective use of information and communication technology (ICT) systems. In this study, the objective is to analyse obstacles and preconditions for an effective use of ICT by focusing on characteristics of interorganizational communication in construction projects. Interorganizational communication and ICT are studied by elaborating on these phenomena from the perspective of two paradigms – the traditional functionalist and the radical humanist – and theories representative for these paradigms – the agency theory and Habermas’ critical social theory. By using the method of metatriangulation, it is shown that in addition to the functionalist perspective, the critical social theory of Habermas is an appropriate theory for analysing obstacles and preconditions for an effective interorganizational communication and use of ICT. Based on this analysis, a critical research agenda on communication and ICT in construction is formulated. It is concluded that this type of research will lead to a more articulated view on the alignment between ICT applications and communication in construction projects and will show new directions for ICT development in the future.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Hans Voordijk

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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