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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

David E. Smith and Hans S. Solgaard

Consumer researchers are interested in the degree to which global convergence is occurring along with various consumer behaviour dimensions and to what extent the…

Abstract

Consumer researchers are interested in the degree to which global convergence is occurring along with various consumer behaviour dimensions and to what extent the consumption patterns in different parts of the world are becoming similar. With increasing internationalisation and cultural cross‐fertilisation, the industrialised societies of the world are converging in many ways. Shifts in alcoholic beverage consumption patterns in Europe over the past 50 years may represent a case in point. As traditional cultural boundaries become blurred, consumer preferences for wine appears to be driven less by long‐standing local and regional traditions, and more by growing acceptance of a wider choice. The disparity of wine consumption among the 12 countries studied has also decreased. Other powerful forces are likely to accelerate the pace of convergence in the future.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Torben Hansen, Jan Møller Jensen and Hans Stubbe Solgaard

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether consumer supermarket satisfaction is influenced by the mere composition of consumers' preference structure, as opposed…

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1876

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether consumer supermarket satisfaction is influenced by the mere composition of consumers' preference structure, as opposed to more widespread approaches where consumer satisfaction is regarded as the degree to which consumer expectations and/or preferences are met.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 130 consumers using self‐administered questionnaires. Structural equation modelling was used to test the authors' proposed hypotheses.

Findings

According to consumers, not many supermarkets offer high quality at low prices, suggesting that consumers with a high‐quality/low‐price preference structure should be disconfirmed and thus dissatisfied. However, this study finds that – when patronising discount stores and upscale stores – consumers who attach high weight to quality and price are likely to become more satisfied than consumers who attach only medium weight to both parameters. For traditional supermarkets (i.e. supermarkets offering medium quality at medium prices) satisfaction occurs equally for both groups of consumers.

Practical implications

Consumers' level of satisfaction with various retailers may not solely be determined by matching preferences with retail offerings, but may also be based on considerations of possibilities for mental justification within a certain preference structure. It is therefore important that managers seek to understand the process of mental justification that may be associated with their offerings, and also the various possibilities for offering mental markers (i.e. anything the consumer can use for the purpose of gaining mental justification of her/his supermarket choices) to be used by consumers.

Originality/value

The authors' results suggest that retailers providing medium quality at medium prices are “stocked in the middle” even though their value package may seem fair when calculated as value=quality/price. Specifically, consumers with a high‐quality/low‐price preference structure can more easily justify visits to retailers providing either high quality at high prices or low quality at low prices; this being the case even though their value preference is only partially served.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Yingkui Yang and Hans Stubbe Solgaard

Voluntary carbon offsets have the potential to contribute to reduce carbon emission and thereby meet the national and international target of carbon emission. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Voluntary carbon offsets have the potential to contribute to reduce carbon emission and thereby meet the national and international target of carbon emission. However, the public support for such scheme in the energy sector is unclear. The purpose of this paper was to invest whether and why residential energy consumers are willing to pay to offset the CO2 emission from electricity consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a self-administrated online questionnaire. A sample of size 1,022 respondents with useable questionnaires was received. Contingent valuation method is used to measure the willingness to pay (WTP) for carbon offset. Finally, the ordered logit model is used in modeling willing to pay for carbon offset.

Findings

The results show that there is significant support from residential energy consumers to offset their CO2 emission from electricity consumption. The WTP is motivated by consumers’ perceptions toward carbon offset, moral obligation and individual’s social-demographic backgrounds.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a new insight on whether and why residential energy consumers would be willing to pay to offset carbon emission from electricity consumption.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Hans Stubbe Solgaard and Yingkui Yang

Aquaculture is, an important animal farming activity, and fish welfare has recently become an important issue in the EU. Driving forces behind the promotion of fish…

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1842

Abstract

Purpose

Aquaculture is, an important animal farming activity, and fish welfare has recently become an important issue in the EU. Driving forces behind the promotion of fish welfare are demands from retailers and consumers. Given this background, it is the main objective of this paper in a Danish setting to investigate the willingness of consumers to pay for farmed rainbow trout with a quality label certifying good fish welfare. It also aims to describe consumers’ perception and consumption of farmed fish and their beliefs about fish welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

A contingent valuation approach was used to evaluate consumers’ willingness to pay for fish welfare, using an open‐ended elicitation technique. To determine the factors that may influence consumers’ willingness to pay for fish welfare the binomial logit model was used. Data were collected from an online survey of Danish consumers in the spring of 2009, sample size 1,000.

Findings

Of the sample, 48 percent were on average willing to pay 25 percent extra for welfare rainbow trout. Primarily women with a longer education, belonging to higher income households are willing to pay extra, also older consumers are more willing to pay more than younger consumers. Consumers who emphasize eco‐friendly production of welfare fish, freshness, and animal welfare also tend to be willing to pay extra.

Originality/value

While much literature has addressed animal welfare and willingness to pay for it, only a few studies have specifically considered consumers’ perception of fish welfare and their willingness to pay for welfare fish.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Christian Harpelund

Abstract

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Onboarding: Getting New Hires off to a Flying Start
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-582-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Arpita Khare

The purpose of the study was to understand influence of assortment, store facility, service and relationship on Indian consumers’ small retailer patronage behaviour. The…

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2485

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to understand influence of assortment, store facility, service and relationship on Indian consumers’ small retailer patronage behaviour. The determinant of small retailer–consumer relationships was studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Indian consumers were contacted through retail stores intercept method and requested to participate in the survey (n = 321). The questionnaire was adapted from the research conducted by Lee et al. (2008) and modified (some items on relationship were added). ANOVA and multiple regression tests were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The Indian consumers’ prefer small retailers due to assortment, service, store facility and relationship. The older and younger populations differ in their reasons for preferring small retail stores. The results show that service and assortment influence consumer-small retailer relationships.

Practical implications

The small retailers’ can harness the relationship and social interaction attribute of their service package for defending their turf against organized retail. The fast-moving consumer goods companies can use the competitive strength of small retailers for increasing their distribution in the interiors of the country and understanding market demand.

Originality/value

There is limited research in India to understand competitive advantage of small retailers over organized retailing.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Brano Glumac and Thomas P. Wissink

This paper aims to report on homebuyers’ preferences and willingness to pay for installed home photovoltaic systems. Their influence on the market position of a dwelling…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on homebuyers’ preferences and willingness to pay for installed home photovoltaic systems. Their influence on the market position of a dwelling is relatively unknown. Considering that expected lifespan of photovoltaic systems is at least 25 years, it is likely that many dwellings with a photovoltaic system will enter the housing market.

Design/methodology/approach

Few houses with installed photovoltaic systems have been sold in the market to date. Lack of real market data imposes a method based on the stated preference data. Therefore, the general preferences toward photovoltaic systems are determined by a discrete choice model based on responses of 227 homebuyers in the Eindhoven region, The Netherlands. Further, the model estimates were used to assess the indirect willingness to pay for home photovoltaic systems. This initial willingness to pay is further reassessed with the direct willingness to pay collected in an open-ended questionnaire format.

Findings

Results of the model show that the homebuyers’ preferences for home photovoltaic systems are large and significant. In addition to general preferences, this article reports on the taste heterogeneity carried out by separating observations based on the respondents’ characteristics. For example, photovoltaic systems are more appealing to homebuyers in more urban or central neighbourhoods. Further, the results of the direct survey lead to the conclusion that people are probably willing to pay close to the replacement value of the system and only 22 per cent of all respondents did not want to pay anything for the installed photovoltaic system.

Research limitations/implications

These findings are exploratory and they raise a number of questions for further investigations, such as those regarding the real estate value of the installed photovoltaic systems. The reported findings must be regarded as local, thus further research is necessary to understand the impact on European housing markets.

Practical implications

Preferences and willingness to pay for home photovoltaic systems can provide a variety of economic, social and political recommendations to different interested parties such as homeowners, buyers, realtors, retailers, energy companies and governments. For instance, a homeowner would like to know what would be the effect of a photovoltaic system on the housing market.

Originality/value

As per the knowledge of authors, this is the first paper to estimate the impact of an installed photovoltaic system on housing choice, measured by stated choice data in the local housing market. It expands the existing body of knowledge for increasingly important issues of valuing and measuring preferences for photovoltaic systems installed on dwellings.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Albert Boaitey and Kota Minegishi

This paper aims to synthesize the literature on consumer preferences for farm animal welfare (FAW), with an emphasis on characterizing consumers based on their FAW…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to synthesize the literature on consumer preferences for farm animal welfare (FAW), with an emphasis on characterizing consumers based on their FAW preferences. The objective is to provide insights into the salient characteristics associated with animal welfare conscious consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a systematic review of the results of published research on consumer preferences for FAW. Approximately 350 papers were reviewed, and 52 were included in the analysis.

Findings

The authors’ review suggests that consumers are not homogenous in their preferences for FAW. The authors identify seven themes that enabled them to characterize consumers with higher FAW preferences. These themes (i.e. age, education and income, gender, country and cross-cultural differences, attitudes and consumer and citizen functions) are grouped under four main headings (socio-demographics, ethics and attitudes, product characteristics and public roles).

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ synthesis reflects the findings reported in the literature to this date; the identified characteristics may change with time as new evidence becomes available.

Practical implications

The information collected in this article would be useful to farmers and food and non-food retailers interested in effective product differentiation and marketing strategies regarding FAW standards. It can also inform policymakers about the state of consumer concerns for FAW.

Originality/value

To the best of authors' knowledge, this is the first study that attempts to develop a systematic profile of consumers based on their FAW preferences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2018

Weisheng Chiu and Hwansuk Choi

The purpose of this paper is to explore Chinese consumers’ behavioral intention to purchase sportswear products online, by applying the model of goal-directed behavior as…

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1160

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore Chinese consumers’ behavioral intention to purchase sportswear products online, by applying the model of goal-directed behavior as a research framework.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to Chinese consumers (N=475) who have purchased sportswear products online in the past. Using SmartPLS 3.0 software, a partial least squares modeling analysis was conducted on the data.

Findings

When it comes to influencing the average Chinese consumer’s desire to purchase a product online, the study indicates that attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and positive anticipated emotion are significant factors. Moreover, desire and frequency of past behavior significantly influenced Chinese consumers’ intention to buy sportswear products online.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide a better understanding, through the analyses of Chinese consumers’ decision-making processes, of consumer intention to purchase sportswear products online.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Sujood, Sheeba Hamid and Naseem Bano

This paper aims to examine travelers’ behavioral intention of traveling in the period of coronavirus by using the theory of planned behavior. The framework incorporates…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine travelers’ behavioral intention of traveling in the period of coronavirus by using the theory of planned behavior. The framework incorporates attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and a very crucial construct, i.e. perceived risk, as per the current critical scenario of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected using a survey instrument on the internet by posting the questionnaire link over social network web pages of online traveling websites. The data was analyzed using structural equations modeling with AMOS 22.0 and SPSS software and the proposed hypotheses were statistically tested. The sample under consideration constitutes 417 responses.

Findings

Empirical findings suggest that attitude, perceived behavioral control and perceived risk are significant for predicting behavioral intention while subjective norms do not. Then, these variables explained about 35% of the variance in the behavioral intention of traveling in the period of coronavirus.

Research limitations/implications

This study can benefit travelers, the tourism and hospitality industry, governments, the aviation industry and other relevant organizations as this paper offers the latest updates and essential information regarding traveler’s intention of traveling in the period of coronavirus. The study mainly focuses on India, so the generalizations of results to other countries are unwanted.

Originality/value

The primary value of this paper is that it tested the theory of planned behavior by incorporating perceived risk in the context of COVID-19. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, in the Indian context, there is no study, which has tested the TPB by adding perceived risk in explaining the Indian citizens’ behavioral intention of traveling in the period of Coronavirus.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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