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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Hans Pruijt

BPR can be deconstructed into four different identities. In the first place it is a product of the management fad industry. In the second place it is part of a…

2764

Abstract

BPR can be deconstructed into four different identities. In the first place it is a product of the management fad industry. In the second place it is part of a neo‐Taylorist movement because of the following characteristics: a top‐down streamlining of operations, unproblematic acceptance of typical Taylorist solutions and the prevalence of assertions that the outcome for workers is an upgraded work content. In the third place BPR is a euphemism for downsizing. Downsizing is much more at the core of BPR than some of its proponents would have it. Finally, BPR functions as a non‐normative, descriptive label for process oriented change. The paper seeks to show how the different identities of BPR interact and get into one another’s way.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Hans Pruijt

Survey data show that post‐Tayloristic production concepts are not developing to the extent that many researchers had originally expected. It also is inadequate to portray…

15329

Abstract

Survey data show that post‐Tayloristic production concepts are not developing to the extent that many researchers had originally expected. It also is inadequate to portray post‐Taylorism as a development that is happening, but just slower than expected. This is inadequate because there are counter‐tendencies: the resurgence of the assembly line in the highly paradigmatic automobile assembly; the rise of the McDonalds‐type organization; and continuing skills‐replacing automation. An explanation for this persistence is sought. Considers possible reasons for decision makers to be attracted to Taylorism as well as reasons for disliking Taylorism. To some extent, it is possible for managers to work around these problems but there are ways to tackle these problems by making modifications to Tayloristic patterns, while keeping basic principles intact. Thus, adaptability is shown to be an important explanation for the resilience of Taylorism. Finally, the paper makes inferences from results obtained in organizations where a more radical break with Taylorism has been attempted.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Hans Pruijt

Examines the deep structure of the discourse on the organization of work and shows that the most successful texts share a common structure: they construct an ideal model…

3957

Abstract

Examines the deep structure of the discourse on the organization of work and shows that the most successful texts share a common structure: they construct an ideal model in which performance and quality go hand‐in‐hand. Provides explanations for the self‐constructed gap between the model and reality, and recipes for change. This type of discourse has widespread appeal, but there are shortcomings attached to it: an inevitable neglect of the employment relation (and accordingly inadequate analysis of resistance to organizational change), and undue optimism about the quality of working life (thereby de‐legitimizing efforts, such as in Scandinavian and Dutch working conditions legislation, to establish the quality of working life as a value in its own right). Critical and empirical evaluative alternative approaches seem unable to capture substantial mind share.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2008

Lynn Owens

This article analyzes the decline of the Amsterdam squatters’ movement, examining not why the movement declined, but how. I argue decline is a critical moment for…

Abstract

This article analyzes the decline of the Amsterdam squatters’ movement, examining not why the movement declined, but how. I argue decline is a critical moment for activists, one full of creative action. Decline is a defining moment through which the present, past, and future are interpreted. Narratives are key to understanding this process. As the movement emergence narrative declined, competing narratives of decline emerged. The widening chasm between the initial story and the movement's status compelled activists to choose between saving the movement or the narrative. I identify four critical moments during the movement's response to decline: they initially deny decline; after admitting decline, they debate tactics, followed by debating identities; and finally they demand decline as the only solution for the movement's problem. The movement moves through a process of increasing exclusion, working to resolve internal contradictions defined by the original narrative and identity.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-892-3

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their…

43440

Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Boreum Ju

The purpose of this study was to explore the foundational theories in human resource development (HRD) by reviewing the literature from an HRD perspective. The following…

2012

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the foundational theories in human resource development (HRD) by reviewing the literature from an HRD perspective. The following research questions guide the study: What are the core theories related to adult and professional education, organizational development and strategic HRD? What are the conceptual frameworks associated with adult and professional education, organizational development and strategic HRD? How have these theories and conceptual frameworks applied the research and practice of HRD?

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviewed the HRD definitions and core theories. The core theories and conceptual frameworks related to adult and professional education, organizational development and strategic human resource development were described. The application of these theories and conceptual frameworks to the research and practice of HRD was addressed.

Findings

The psychology theories that were explored were the adult learning theories, and that gestalt-psychology, behavioral psychology and cognitive psychology were illustrated. Systems theory was explored and explained in relation to organization development. Economic theory was explored and explained focusing on human capital theory; and it was demonstrated how economic theory is associated with strategic HRD.

Originality/value

The core-theory description and linking to adult and professional education, organizational development and strategic HRD may give understanding of the HRD foundations and ethical perspective that is essential for both scholars and professionals. The conceptual frameworks presented can be used to help facilitate discussions on developing or implementing HRD programs.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Andreas Munzel and Werner H. Kunz

As the internet has become an increasingly relevant communication and exchange platform, social interactions exist in multiple forms. The research aims to integrate a…

2856

Abstract

Purpose

As the internet has become an increasingly relevant communication and exchange platform, social interactions exist in multiple forms. The research aims to integrate a multitude of those interactions to understand who contributes and why different types of contributors generate and leverage social capital on online review sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature about social capital, social exchange theory, and transformative consumer research, the authors carried out a study of 693 contributors on a hotel review site. Content analysis and a latent profile analysis were used to research the contribution types and the underlying motives for generating and leveraging social capital.

Findings

Through the integration of various customer-to-customer interactions, the results reveal a three-class structure of contributors on review sites. These three groups of individuals show distinct patterns in their preferred interaction activities and the underlying motives.

Research limitations/implications

The authors develop the existing literature on transmission of electronic word-of-mouth messages and typologies of contributors. Future research should seek to expand the findings to additional industry and platform contexts and to support the findings through the inclusion of behavioral data.

Originality/value

The research contributes to researchers and marketers in the field by empirically investigating who and why individuals engage in online social interactions. The authors expand upon the existing literature by highlighting the importance of social debt in anonymous online environments and by assessing a three-class structure of online contributors.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Anne Richter, Katharina Näswall, Nele De Cuyper, Magnus Sverke, Hans De Witte and Johnny Hellgren

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate how employees' coping (problem, emotion and avoidance focused coping) may affect the reactions to job insecurity…

2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate how employees' coping (problem, emotion and avoidance focused coping) may affect the reactions to job insecurity. Because the coping investigated in the present study addresses the stressor in different ways, the authors expect different moderating effects depending on the type of coping, which results in three different hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 579 Swedish accountants was used to test these hypotheses via surveys.

Findings

The findings support the authors' assumptions that emotion focused coping weakened the relation of job insecurity and some of the outcomes. Both avoidance and problem focused coping strengthened the relation between job insecurity and some of the outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

As this study utilizes cross-sectional data and only one occupational group, it is important to test the relations using longitudinal data with different occupational groups in future research.

Practical implications

From these results some practical conclusions can be drawn as to which coping forms might be more beneficial, which can be helpful for organizations in order to develop intervention programs.

Originality/value

This study expanded the understanding of coping in the context of job insecurity by testing different forms of coping and including a variety of important outcomes of job insecurity.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Lilian Ingutia Oyieke and Archie L. Dick

The purpose of this paper was to assess the Web 2.0 competencies’ levels of academic librarians in selected libraries from two library consortia KLISC in Kenya and GAELIC…

1490

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess the Web 2.0 competencies’ levels of academic librarians in selected libraries from two library consortia KLISC in Kenya and GAELIC in South Africa and how these competencies can be sources of empowerment for the effective provision of e-services. As service organizations, academic libraries face challenges similar to those in other service sectors. One of the major challenges includes that of providing not only quality print resources but also quality e-services. Globally, academic librarians use various Web 2.0 technologies to engage with their library users and colleagues and for their information work. Academic librarians are now, more than ever, expected to be empowered and build diverse voices, perspectives and arguments into library collections and services. Most of the youths (academic library users) in developing countries like Kenya and South Africa are heavy users of Web 2.0 technologies. This presents a challenge for their academic librarians who must augment their traditional library skills with Web 2.0 technologies for provision of effective e-services. This study explores the interconnections between librarian empowerment, traditional librarian skills and Web 2.0 competencies for effective e-services.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey method of research was used to conduct the study. Purposive sampling was used to select a homogeneous sample of academic librarians and libraries that use the Web 2.0 technologies. An online questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions was used to collect data. The Web 2.0 competency levels were analyzed and presented using descriptive statistics. To achieve more robust findings and to illustrate the implications of Web 2.0 for librarian empowerment, the ATLAS. ti software was used to illustrate interconnections between librarian empowerment, traditional librarian skills and Web 2.0 technologies. The emerging codes and themes are presented in three network views.

Findings

The findings from the quantitative data indicate that the majority of the librarians have intermediate competency levels in Web 2.0 technologies. The findings from the qualitative data show that Web 2.0 tools and librarian empowerment can be used to illustrate interconnections in content collaboration tools, bookmarking tools and SNSs. Web 2.0 competencies can transform knowledge-sharing activities, augment existing authoritative information service, foster interaction and market information products and services. This study redefines librarian empowerment through competency in Web 2.0 tools and new roles for effective e-services.

Originality/value

This paper proposes that librarian empowerment through Web 2.0 competencies is essential in augmenting traditional library skills and in providing effective e-services. This manuscript describes original work and is a re-submission EL-08-2015-0143.R1 due to expired deadline in this journal. Both authors approved the manuscript and this submission.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Richard Cooney

This paper sets out to test the claim made in the lean production literature that the lean production system is universally applicable. The proponents of the lean…

12472

Abstract

This paper sets out to test the claim made in the lean production literature that the lean production system is universally applicable. The proponents of the lean production model insist that it will supersede both mass production and specialised batch production; but this paper argues that, whilst lean production practices have been adopted and adapted by many producers, batch production has an enduring value from both a work design and a manufacturing process design perspective. The paper reviews the evidence for the persistence of batch production and of craft work methods in both luxury vehicle manufacture and specialty component manufacture and highlights the conditions under which batch production remains viable.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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