Search results

1 – 10 of 706
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Erik L. Olson and Hans Mathias Thjømøe

The purpose of this paper is to compare the relative performance of TV sponsorships with the industry standard 30‐second TV spot advertising on achieving common…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the relative performance of TV sponsorships with the industry standard 30‐second TV spot advertising on achieving common communication goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The two media are tested with an experiment using realistic stimuli and target market representative samples and employing six brands as both TV sponsors and TV advertisers.

Findings

Ten seconds of TV sponsoring works almost equally as well as 30‐second spots across all measures and brands. While the outright performance differs by type of brand (i.e. high fit versus lower fit, known versus unknown), the relative performance between media does not vary.

Research limitations/implications

The stimuli only gave subjects a brief exposure to each medium. The six stimuli brands, four effect measures, and the Norwegian sample may also not be representative for all types of TV sponsoring/advertising contexts.

Practical implications

Marketing managers can use the results to better allocate their communication spending between TV spot advertising and TV sponsorships, by determining which medium offers better value in achieving communication goals.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, the comparison is the most realistic and controlled experiment in this area, with high levels of internal and external validity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Erik L. Olson and Hans Mathias Thjømøe

This paper seeks to use branding literature to understand the rise and fall of GM's brands.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to use branding literature to understand the rise and fall of GM's brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of presenting a case analysis using secondary sources covering GM's brands and products, managerial leadership, and market and financial performance throughout its 100‐year history.

Findings

During much of its first 50 years, GM was led by engineers who pioneered professional brand management, and through intelligent allocation of resources created one of the world's strongest portfolio of brands. Government anti‐trust hearings shifted GM to a cost‐cutting orientation during its second 50 years that had a negative impact on the GM brands and brought the current financial problems.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study of only one firm, but parallels are drawn with other firms that have had similar brand issues.

Practical implications

Firms with multiple brands need top management leadership to ensure that each brand has a unique mission with minimal overlap and adequate resources for product development, innovation, and communications to achieve its mission. If the mission or resources disappear, non‐core brands need to be terminated. Governments that wish to support well managed firms with strong brands need to be careful in using anti‐trust actions, and should not force firms to make products that are not desired by customers.

Originality/value

The paper takes a novel approach to evaluating the current state of General Motors by examining the factors that led to chronic mismanagement of its brands, which in turn has reduced brand equity, market share, and profits, and that have magnified GM's problems with labor and legacy costs, productivity, and product mix.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Imoh Antai and Hans Olson

Although the supply chain (SC) competition concept has emerged during the past decade as the way firms will compete in future, there is scant academic research on actual…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the supply chain (SC) competition concept has emerged during the past decade as the way firms will compete in future, there is scant academic research on actual mechanisms through which such competition can occur. The purpose of this paper is to proposes interaction as the means by which competition between supply chains may be undertaken.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates a Swedish logistics center via case study methodology to develop the idea of interaction for SC vs SC competition.

Findings

Results suggest that interaction points along organizations ' supply chains may present enough breadth to assume a role in determining how SC vs SC competition may be played out in reality.

Research limitations/implications

Interaction, as proposed here, implies an emphasis on all points at which supply chains meet to request goods and services, including various points where such supply chains converge, e.g. service providers, original equipment manufacturers, etc.

Originality/value

Most studies dealing with competition between supply chains fall short of exploring the link between theory and corresponding practice of this evolving competition mode. Such a link is provided with the use of logistics centers.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

F.H. Rolf Seringhaus

Until recently, little research has been directed at the measurement of the impact of governmental support on the firm. The major focus of this article is on the…

Abstract

Until recently, little research has been directed at the measurement of the impact of governmental support on the firm. The major focus of this article is on the methodological and measurement issues that appear to have a confounding effect and may account for broad equivocality of the findings in many of the studies. An evaluation paradigm is developed and applied to the research reviewed. The article concludes with a synthesis of the issues and provides specific directions for future research.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

The purpose of this paper is to narrate the history of General Motors' (GM's) success in its first 50 years, and describe the causes of its decline after government

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to narrate the history of General Motors' (GM's) success in its first 50 years, and describe the causes of its decline after government anti‐trust hearings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an historical analysis of GM through secondary sources.

Findings

GM was forced to abandon the very management principles it had developed and pioneered because of government legislation, leading to brand‐killing initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is of one firm only, but draws parallels with other potential firms.

Practical implications

This paper should serve as a warning to all industrial and commercial giants that threaten a monopoly, including IT firms like IBM and Microsoft.

Social implications

This paper addresses the negative effects of government regulation in a profit‐making environment, and will affect investors and consumers.

Originality/value

The paper clearly describes sound management principles in relation to brand management, and traces the history of a car company that is currently facing financial difficulties.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Present day literature on the general topic of export planning for international markets appears to be a repetition of standard works. It does not seem to be geared to the…

Abstract

Present day literature on the general topic of export planning for international markets appears to be a repetition of standard works. It does not seem to be geared to the needs of managers of small exporting manufacturing concerns. The small businessman needs ways of analysing export markets, the potential exportability of his product, and, equally important, tools for predicting which products are likely to be threatened by import competition, and the appropriate marketing strategies to use in exporting.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Gary A. Knight and Roger J. Calantone

There is much research suggesting that the image consumers hold about a product’s country of origin can influence their purchase decision, but little empirical work has…

Abstract

There is much research suggesting that the image consumers hold about a product’s country of origin can influence their purchase decision, but little empirical work has focused on the underlying cognitive processing. A flexible model is devised and tested to represent country image processing, using data from large samples of US and Japanese consumers. In addition to strongly supporting the validity of the model, results suggest that country image cognitive processing is significantly more complex than previously thought, and that culture appears to play an important role in purchase decisions. The flexible model represents a substantive improvement in the depiction of cognitive processing regarding country‐of‐origin image.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

P.S. Han, Olson and R.L. Johnston

In conventional boundary element formulations, the singularities of the fundamental solution are usually located on the problem boundary. This leads to difficulties in…

Abstract

In conventional boundary element formulations, the singularities of the fundamental solution are usually located on the problem boundary. This leads to difficulties in evaluating solution quantities on or near the boundary. A method is presented for locating the singularities on an auxiliary boundary outside the problem domain and having this auxiliary boundary location determined automatically via a Galerkin criterion. This automatic generation of the auxiliary boundary results in a highly accurate, adaptive but non‐linear method. The number of singularities can be significantly reduced compared to conventional boundary element formulations which usually require the same number of singularities as the number of boundary elements used. The method is illustrated with three examples involving Laplace's equation in two dimensions. Excellent numerical results are obtained in all cases using only a few singularities.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Dev Jani and Heesup Han

This study attempts to answer the following questions: can the Big Five factors (BFF) of personality facilitate a social comparison (SC) of hotel guests? Can the BFF…

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to answer the following questions: can the Big Five factors (BFF) of personality facilitate a social comparison (SC) of hotel guests? Can the BFF explain the emotional responses of hotel guests? Do SC and consumption emotions mediate the influence of personality on hotel guests' levels of satisfaction?

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a survey of hotel guests, which yielded an effective sample of 564, was subjected to a series of multiple regression analyses. The Baron and Kenny approach was employed to test mediating impacts.

Findings

The five factors of personality explain significant variations in consumption emotions and SCs of hotel guests. Apart from consumption emotions, SC was found to influence hotel guests' satisfaction significantly. Further, greater guest satisfaction was a partial mediator of the effect of positive consumption emotion on revisit and word-of-mouth intentions but constituted only a partial mediator of negative consumption emotions on word-of-mouth.

Research limitations/implications

The results offer managerial insights into marketing strategies, design, and operational and human-resource management.

Originality/value

Few studies have integrated personality and customers' consumption emotions with satisfaction and behavioral intentions. This research gap has been compounded by a lack of research on SCs that might further explain personality-customer responses and behavioral intentions. This study fills this gap by reporting on a survey of hotel guests that provided data on these relationships. Theoretically, the findings justify the value of personality and SCs in hotel settings.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of 706