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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Mary L. Fischer and Hans Gleijm

Studies the behaviour of men and women in working groups –men through the analogy of the pecking order, i.e. hierarchical, andwomen through that of the crab basket, i.e…

Abstract

Studies the behaviour of men and women in working groups – men through the analogy of the pecking order, i.e. hierarchical, and women through that of the crab basket, i.e. equality. Discusses the respective advantages and disadvantages of the two groups, which appear to be complementary. Concludes, however, that, despite the apparent complementariness, both sides need to show mutual understanding of their respective codes before they can achieve constructive co‐operation in management.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive…

Abstract

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since it is based on complaints. It seems to be a matter of time before the Quebec Government passes a pro‐active legislation on pay equity and, in doing so, it will likely draw its inspiration from the Pay Equity Act (PEA) passed by the Ontario Government in 1987. One of PEAs important features is the emphasis on institutional structures and practices in determining the appropriate unit for the purpose of achieving pay equity. In practice, such units will often match up with the usual job families (e.g. clerical or office vs production jobs). However, the historical development of jobs families is intertwined with the evolution of occupational segregation between men and women in the labour markets.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Victoria B. Hoffarth

The recent years have been marked by the increasing participation of women in the labour force internationally. Especially in the industrialised countries of Western…

Abstract

The recent years have been marked by the increasing participation of women in the labour force internationally. Especially in the industrialised countries of Western Europe and North America, this labour force participation is now well over 40%. Globally, however, the estimate is around 33%. A large number of these women are still found in the agriculture sector and the informal sector of industry. For those working in the formal industrial sector, a significant portion work in the shopfloor of assembly line operations for products ranging from electronics to textiles. Women in management comprise less than 1% of all economically active women. For the purposes of this paper, a “manager” is defined as a person who has latitude in decision making as to the allocation and use of organisational resources, including physical, financial, and human resources.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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