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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Hannah Meacham, Jillian Cavanagh, Amie Shaw and Timothy Bartram

The purpose of this paper is to examine human resource management (HRM) innovation programs in the early stages of employment for workers with an intellectual disability (WWID).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine human resource management (HRM) innovation programs in the early stages of employment for workers with an intellectual disability (WWID).

Design/methodology/approach

The first case study was carried out at a large national courier company where a film innovation programme was used to enhance the socialisation process of WWID. The second case study was at a five-star hotel situated in a large city where a buddy system innovation programme was used in the induction and training process of WWID.

Findings

The overarching “life theme” created through these innovation programs was one of enhanced and creative opportunities for social inclusion. The participants displayed more confidence and independence in their ability and exhibited aspirations to advance and succeed in their roles.

Practical implications

The study argues that HR professionals need to be more proactive in finding innovative ways to engage WWID in the early stages of employment.

Originality/value

The qualitative study is underpinned by socialisation and career construction theory which provides the framework to discuss the ways in which socialisation and socially inclusive HRM practices enable participants and other WWID achieve success on their career paths. The key message of our research is that early vocational socialisation innovation programs can make a positive difference to the work experiences of WWID.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Jillian Cavanagh, Hannah Meacham, Patricia Pariona-Cabrera and Timothy Bartram

The purpose of the article is to examine the experiences of workers with intellectual disability (WWID) and subtle discriminatory practices that hold these workers back…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the article is to examine the experiences of workers with intellectual disability (WWID) and subtle discriminatory practices that hold these workers back from thriving at the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design employs the Shore et al. (2011) framework of inclusion supported by optimal distinctiveness theory (ODT) (Brewer, 1991). These theoretical frames are used to examine the potential for WWID to become members of a work group and experience the opportunity to develop their unique selves, negotiate and thrive through their work for purposeful career outcomes. A qualitative case study approach was adopted through interviews and focus groups with a total of 91 participants: 41 WWID, 5 human resource (HR) managers, 5 duty/department managers (DMs), 24 colleagues and 16 supervisors.

Findings

The authors found that enhancing inclusion is underpinned by the positive impact of human resource management (HRM) practices and line management support for WWID feelings of belongingness and uniqueness that enable them to thrive through their work activities. The authors demonstrate that WWID need manager support and positive social interactions to increase their learning and vitality for work to embrace opportunities for growth. However, when WWID do not have these conditions, there are fewer opportunities for them to thrive at the workplace.

Practical implications

There is a need for formal HRM and management support and inclusive organisational interventions to mitigate discriminatory practices and better support WWID at work. There is an opportunity for HRM to design training and development around belongingness and uniqueness for this cohort of workers to maximise WWID opportunities to thrive through their work.

Originality/value

This study examines a cohort of WWID who are often forgotten and subtly discriminated against more so than other minority or vulnerable cohorts in the workplace, especially in terms of their development and reaching their full potential at work, which has an impact on their ability to thrive through their work. The paper makes an innovative contribution to the HRM literature through unpacking the processes through which Shore et al.'s (2011) conceptualisation of belongingness and uniqueness contributes to thriving for a marginalised and often overlooked cohort of workers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Hannah Meacham, Jillian Cavanagh, Amie Shaw and Timothy Bartram

The purpose of this paper is to examine how HRM practices enhance and/or impede the employment, participation, and well-being of workers with intellectual disabilities in…

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1438

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how HRM practices enhance and/or impede the employment, participation, and well-being of workers with intellectual disabilities in three hotels located in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a case study methodology, including interviews with three HR managers, three department managers, 17 workers with intellectual disabilities, and focus groups of 16 supervisors and 24 work colleagues.

Findings

The research found that the opportunities to participate in work are driven primarily by developing a social climate that enables social cohesion through the altruistic motives of managers/supervisors and reciprocal relationships.

Originality/value

The findings lend support for the importance of both formal and informal HR practices, such as inclusive recruitment and selection, mentoring, and training and development, as well as individualised day-to-day support provided by supervisors and colleagues, to improve the participation and well-being of workers with an intellectual disability.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Contemporary HRM Issues in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-457-7

Abstract

Details

Contemporary HRM Issues in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-457-7

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2014

Daryl Koehn

In order to consider fiction’s contribution to understanding organizations and their ethics, we need to examine the connection between creativity and morality. This…

Abstract

In order to consider fiction’s contribution to understanding organizations and their ethics, we need to examine the connection between creativity and morality. This chapter explores six possible relations, drawing upon a variety of works (creations) from a poet, a playwright, and several philosophers. I argue that any relationship between fiction/creativity and morality is multi-dimensional and should be treated as such in future research in business ethics and organizational studies. In particular, we are not entitled simply to assume that fictive creativity will bolster existing norms or engender virtues. On the contrary, in some cases, fiction reveals just how difficult it is to apply norms or to identify the virtuous course of action, given that we often do not have an accurate understanding of what is going on in an organizational or business setting, much less a cogent grasp on whether the behavior is right and good.

Details

The Contribution of Fiction to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-949-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Sara Harrington

Provides students, scholars, and interested parties an introductory essay and selected bibliography of recent resources on the art and material culture of the Shakers, a…

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735

Abstract

Purpose

Provides students, scholars, and interested parties an introductory essay and selected bibliography of recent resources on the art and material culture of the Shakers, a communitarian religious group who lived in the United States from the 18th to 21st centuries.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and exhibition catalogues examining Shaker art and material culture dating from 1987 to the present.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship on Shaker art, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions of well and lesser known Shaker objects.

Practical implications

Provides a point of departure for an exploration of Shaker studies, focusing on the art and material culture of the Shakers, and highlights important sources within the growing body of literature on the Shakers.

Originality/value

As the only recent annotated bibliography of material on Shaker art, the article provides access to interdisciplinary resources that are widely scattered within the humanities literature and thus previously difficult to locate. The article also serves to bring resources on Shaker art and material culture to a wider audience, since the special libraries devoted to Shaker collection do not have electronic catalogs, and are largely limited to on‐site access.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Andrew Speak, Mark Usher, Hilary Solly and Stefan Zerbe

The non-material benefits which people derive from ecosystems, cultural ecosystem services (CES), can be difficult to measure and quantify. This study aims to demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The non-material benefits which people derive from ecosystems, cultural ecosystem services (CES), can be difficult to measure and quantify. This study aims to demonstrate the usefulness of social media analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The widespread use of social media applications has provided a novel methodology for obtaining crowd-sourced data, which can reveal patterns in how social media users interact with urban greenspace and participate in place-making activities. This study explores how urban trees are represented in images tagged with the city of Bolzano, Italy, and uploaded over the course of a year to the image-sharing application Instagram.

Findings

A third of all the images contained some elements of green nature, with 3.1% of the images portraying urban trees as the main subject and 11% with urban trees as background features. Seasonal preferences for winter and summer scenes emerged. Accompanying text, in the form of hashtags and image descriptions, was mostly positive and showed how enthusiastically people describe urban nature. An assessment of the images in terms of CES revealed that beyond aesthetic factors and the inspiration to take photographs of nature, a wide range of CES are represented, reflecting the recognition of the benefits of urban trees by Instagrammers. The collection of images provided a unique snapshot of the city of Bolzano.

Practical implications

This reinforces the importance of urban trees within planning policy for providing sense of place, recreation and stress relief for residents and tourists.

Originality/value

The study builds on recent advances in social media research, focussing on the important field of urban CES.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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