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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2022

Owen P. O'Sullivan, Anita Bignell, Jennifer Powell, Sandra Parish, Lloyd Campbell, Hannah Iannelli, Chris Attoe and Grégoire Billon

During COVID-19, Maudsley Simulation successfully pivoted to fully online delivery of simulation-based education (SBE) in mental health. In migrating digitally, the…

Abstract

Purpose

During COVID-19, Maudsley Simulation successfully pivoted to fully online delivery of simulation-based education (SBE) in mental health. In migrating digitally, the simulation faculty experienced a range of new phenomena and challenges. The authors’ experiences may be transferable to other specialities and for other educator groups. By sharing the authors’ experiences, this study aims to support others adapt to online SBE.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece represents the authors’ collective reflections on the challenges of adapting their facilitation skills to the online environment. It also offers various suggestions on how to improve the learner experience in view of these challenges.

Findings

Beyond merely platform orientation and operating procedure familiarisation, the team gained insights into ensuring optimal learning, engagement and participant experience during online deliveries. Delivery of online SBE brings several potential barriers to psychological safety and these warrant careful consideration by experienced simulationists.

Practical implications

Optimising participant engagement and psychological safety remain key considerations despite this novel medium. Facilitators must be willing to adapt accordingly to begin delivering high-quality online SBE.

Originality/value

From their experience, facilitators must reframe their debriefing expectations and adjust how they engage participants and manage group dynamics given the inherently different nature of this new learning environment.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2021

Marta Ortega Vega, Chris Attoe, Hannah Iannelli, Aleks Saunders and Sean Cross

Public mental health training can effectively support well-being at a population level. The application of this type of training is increasingly prevalent, however…

Abstract

Purpose

Public mental health training can effectively support well-being at a population level. The application of this type of training is increasingly prevalent, however, training evaluation is currently limited and inconsistent. This paper aims to summarise the characteristics of public mental health training available in England, presents key quality criteria for this training and identifies gaps in training provision.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a pragmatic mixed-methods approach including database and Google Searches, focus groups and survey methods. The data analysis included a structured data extraction template for the training availability scoping and thematic analysis of the survey and focus groups.

Findings

This paper identifies a total of 74 training courses targeting workplace employees, young people and the general population. Most courses were delivered face-to-face (54), followed by e-learning (16) and blended modalities (4). This paper derives four core quality principles, focussing on the training approach, key features of training, trainer attributes and evaluation. There were no significant gaps in training provision, although areas for future development included consistency in public mental health terminology, systems and populations requiring additional training and the logistics of training delivery, etc.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the evidence base of interventions that are currently available, supporting the efforts to evaluate the impact of training provision in this area. This paper provides a novel approach to assessing training quality and discuss areas for development and innovation in this field.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Hannah Iannelli, Camilla Tooley, Grégoire Billon, Sean Cross, James Pathan and Chris Attoe

Individuals health with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience comorbid physical and mental health needs and have poorer outcomes resulting in early mortality…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals health with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience comorbid physical and mental health needs and have poorer outcomes resulting in early mortality. Currently, many training provisions based on ID exist; however, limited research supports their effectiveness. High-fidelity simulation is an innovative training mechanism with promising preliminary results. This study aims to evaluate the longitudinal impact of simulation training on clinical practice in ID.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was used in this study. A one-day simulation course using actors who had ID was delivered to 39 health-care professionals from across London hospitals. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted 12–18 months post training.

Findings

High-fidelity simulation training is an effective training modality, which has a sustainable impact on participants, their clinical practice and patients. Core features of the training including debriefing, the use and type of actors, scenario design and the facilitators are crucial learning mechanisms which impacts learning outcomes and changes to behaviour in clinical practice and settings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to longitudinally evaluate high-fidelity simulation training designed to improve the physical and mental health needs of those with ID. The research begins to bridge an important gap in the current literature, with a need for more research.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2005

Ravit Reichman

This chapter argues that Albert Camus's post-World War II novella The Fall narrates a bridge of complicity between medicine and law, implicating both professions in the…

Abstract

This chapter argues that Albert Camus's post-World War II novella The Fall narrates a bridge of complicity between medicine and law, implicating both professions in the Nazi formulation of race. Rather than reading the work as a broadly construed allegory of the Holocaust, it situates Camus's text within the framework of the Nuremberg trials and their judgment of perpetrators in professional rather than in wide-ranging moral terms. The essay concludes by examining Camus's use of the subjunctive, which posits juridical force as the act of imagining alternatives to the past, and using these alternative scenarios as a basis for judgment.

Details

Toward a Critique of Guilt: Perspectives from Law and the Humanities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-189-7

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