Search results

1 – 10 of 183
Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2021

Victoria McCreanor, Hannah Carter, Robin Blythe and Suzanne Robinson

Abstract

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Hannah Carter and Miguel Moital

The purpose of this paper is to create a taxonomy of event participants based on risk and security perceptions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a taxonomy of event participants based on risk and security perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups were established with British mothers, one with five mothers and the other with six, recruited through convenience and snowball sampling. A tree diagram was employed to uncover the taxonomic structure underlying risk and security perceptions. In creating the taxonomy, two critical issues were found to best categorise participants: the extent to which risks were considered before attending an event and whether or not participants showed an interest in knowing about security measures in advance of the event.

Findings

Six taxonomy categories were created, based on the unique combination of attitude and reactions: overthinker, investigator, naïve, ignorer, survivalist and optimiser. Similarities and differences between the types of participants were examined across 12 typical traits and reactions to risk and security.

Practical implications

The results provide event organisers with an understanding of whether they need to communicate their risk management strategy, and if so how they can best achieve this.

Originality/value

Existing taxonomies have tended to identify customer types based on risk perceptions alone. This research expands such work by considering attitudes towards both risk and security and how these affect event attendance. Hence, the descriptive taxonomy developed in the paper provides empirical evidence of the diverse risk and security perceptions at public events.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Sean T. Hannah and David A. Waldman

Behavioral ethics research in the field of management is burgeoning. While many advancements have been made, applying an organizational neuroscience approach to this area…

Abstract

Behavioral ethics research in the field of management is burgeoning. While many advancements have been made, applying an organizational neuroscience approach to this area of research has the possibility of creating significant new theoretical, empirical, and practical contributions. We overview the major areas of behavioral ethics research concerning moral cognition and conation, and then we concentrate on existing neuroscience applications to moral cognition (moral awareness, moral judgment/reasoning, effects of moral emotions on moral reasoning, and ethical ideology). We also demonstrate the usefulness of neuroscience applications to organizational behavioral ethics research by summarizing a recent study on the neuroscience of ethical leadership. We close by recommending future research that applies neuroscience to topics such as moral development, group ethical judgments and group moral approbation, and moral conation (e.g., moral courage and moral identity). Our overall purpose is to encourage future neuroscience research on organizational behavioral ethics to supplement and/or complement existing psychological approaches.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Teacher Preparation in the United States
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-688-9

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Gemma Dyble, Anna Tickle and Christine Collinson

There has been extensive growth in the employment of mental health peer support workers (PSWs) over the last decade. However, limited research exists when exploring how…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been extensive growth in the employment of mental health peer support workers (PSWs) over the last decade. However, limited research exists when exploring how PSWs make sense of the transition of entering and enacting the role. The purpose of this paper is to explore the lived experience of NHS employed PSWs’ transition from their own experiences of mental health problems to provide a service to support individuals with their mental health problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used purposive sampling to recruit seven participants who were individually interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Three superordinate themes were identified: fluctuating identities, PSW role and organisational culture. These were interpreted as interdependent with interrelating subordinate themes.

Research limitations/implications

Participants considered the complex, idiosyncratic and changeable nature of the transitions and the impact on their individual, interpersonal and collective identities. Emotional and practical support appeared to assist the transition whilst competing roles and blurred boundaries constrained the enactment of the new role. Implications for practice and research are provided.

Originality/value

Reports on original research and adds to the sparse UK literature in this area.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Jane Turner and Clare Warren

In 1976, in a speech at Ruskin College, Oxford, Prime Minister James Callaghan asked ‘Why is it that such a high proportion of girls abandon science before leaving…

Abstract

In 1976, in a speech at Ruskin College, Oxford, Prime Minister James Callaghan asked ‘Why is it that such a high proportion of girls abandon science before leaving school?’ (Gillard, 2018). Little has changed over the last 40 years; a recent report from the National Audit Office (2018, p. 28) stated that only 8% of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) apprenticeships were taken up by women in 2016/2017 and that the shortage of STEM skills in the workforce is a key UK economic problem. However, just as the Aldridge marriage has been the source of considerable interest and the site of significant financial investment in terms of designer kitchens and expensive holidays, so has the issue of ‘girls in science’ been a consistently debated topic and taken up a large chunk of government and industry spending. Research (Archer et al., 2013) suggests that although children enjoy their science experiences in school, too few pupils aspire to a STEM career. It reveals that the pupils most likely to aspire to careers in science are those whose families have high ‘science capital’ which ‘refers to the science-related qualifications, understanding, knowledge (about science and “how it works”), interest and social contacts (e.g. “knowing someone who works in a science-related job”)’ (Archer et al., 2016, p. 3).

Episodes of The Archers are full of scientific talk, from herbal leys to plate meters. This chapter looks at how the science capital in Ambridge is shared. Why is Alice Carter an engineer and not Emma Grundy? Will Kiera Grundy choose physics A level? Who are the female STEM role models? How can the concept of science capital help us to understand the career paths of Ambridge residents? Will the young girls of Ambridge remedy the gender imbalance in STEM careers?

Details

Gender, Sex and Gossip in Ambridge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-948-9

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Hannah Kate Lewis and Una Foye

The current policy landscape advocates for the involvement of people with lived experience in the co-production and co-delivery of mental health services. However…

Abstract

Purpose

The current policy landscape advocates for the involvement of people with lived experience in the co-production and co-delivery of mental health services. However, evidence on how to do this safely and effectively for people with eating disorders (EDs) is lacking. The purpose of this study was to explore and synthesis the implementation of ED interventions which involved lived-experience and to evaluate the associated benefits and risks to participants.

Design/methodology/approach

This study will conduct a systematic review of ED interventions which involve people with lived experience of an ED. A total of seven databases and four subject-specific journals were searched using Boolean search terms.

Findings

The search yielded ten eligible studies. Involvement procedures were extracted which highlighted variation with some roles being continuous and active and others being isolated and passive. Qualitative results were extracted and thematically analysed which demonstrated many benefits from involving people with lived experience, such as normalisation of experiences, inspiration to recover and the sharing of insight, as well as some risks such as disingenuity and exposure to triggering content.

Practical implications

The implications of this review highlight the need for policy and guidance to minimise variation across procedures and implementation of co-production to ensure positive outcomes and benefits for participants, given the current landscape. More research in the benefits and risks for those involved in the delivery of the interventions is needed to ensure that co-production and peer support is delivered as safely and effectively as possible.

Originality/value

This was the first systematic review since 2016 (Fogarty et al., 2016) to assess peer-mentorship programmes in ED treatments, whilst expanding the remit to include wider definitions of peer-support and peer-mentorships such as co-production and co-design in research.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

1 – 10 of 183