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Article

Arian Razmi-Farooji, Hanna Kropsu-Vehkaperä, Janne Härkönen and Harri Haapasalo

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to understand data management challenges in e-maintenance systems from a holistically viewpoint through summarizing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to understand data management challenges in e-maintenance systems from a holistically viewpoint through summarizing the earlier scattered research in the field, and second, to present a conceptual approach for addressing these challenges in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is realized as a combination of a literature review and by the means of analyzing the practices on an industry leader in manufacturing and maintenance services.

Findings

This research provides a general understanding over data management challenges in e-maintenance and summarizes their associated proposed solutions. In addition, this paper lists and exemplifies different types and sources of data which can be collected in e-maintenance, across different organizational levels. Analyzing the data management practices of an e-maintenance industry leader provides a conceptual approach to address identified challenges in practice.

Research limitations/implications

Since this paper is based on studying the practices of a single company, it might be limited to generalize the results. Future research topics can focus on each of mentioned data management challenges and also validate the applicability of presented model in other companies and industries.

Practical implications

Understanding the e-maintenance-related challenges helps maintenance managers and other involved stakeholders in e-maintenance systems to better solve the challenges.

Originality/value

The so-far literature on e-maintenance has been studied with narrow focus to data and data management in e-maintenance appears as one of the less studied topics in the literature. This research paper contributes to e-maintenance by highlighting the deficiencies of the discussion surrounding the perspectives of data management in e-maintenance by studying all common data management challenges and listing different types of data which need to be acquired in e-maintenance systems.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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Article

Kongkiti Peter Phusavat, David Delahunty, Pekka Kess and Hanna Kropsu-Vehkapera

The study aims to examine the issues relating to workplace learning at the upper secondary school level. This study is based on the two questions. How should the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the issues relating to workplace learning at the upper secondary school level. This study is based on the two questions. How should the professional/peer-learning community or PLC be developed and deployed to help strengthen in-service teacher training? The second question is what are the success factors which contribute to the continuity of the PLC within the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) context?

Design/methodology/approach

This study, considered as a case study, is based on BMA’s in-service teaching training program which took place from August 2014 until September 2016. Observations and interviews represent the key tasks undertaken for this study. Observation focuses on the PLC adaptation for a teacher network and key activities relating to actual teaching and learning. Interviews with teachers and students help evaluate the suitability of the PLC’s use as a component of in-service teacher training for workplace learning. The application proposal to international funding helps outline how the data from the observation and interviews should be grouped and analyzed.

Findings

The PLC’s implementation involves a network of teachers (those teachers who traveled to Finland for pedagogical training), the selection of a common theme (i.e. a polluted waterway reflecting environmental phenomena) allowing various different subject teachers to work together and actual teaching and learning across schools with students through project work. The results of the interviews demonstrate that a PLC is a potential alternative for BMA’s in-service teacher training. The PLC allows teachers to share their experience and knowledge while simultaneously strengthening students’ life skills through the PLC’s applications.

Research limitations/implications

The case study demonstrates the process through which the PLC is successfully deployed. The BMA applied the PLC alongside and in collaboration with the actual student teaching and learning, instead of separating them because the PLC was regarded as training. PLC is dependent on: the willingness of the teachers to work together, their ability to come up with a common topic that they can link their knowledge, enable several subject teachers to work together, an effective planning process to gradually involve the students in problem-based learning and public recognition to demonstrate their success.

Practical implications

The PLC appears to benefit workplace (or school) learning and development for both teachers and students. Additionally, the use of the PLC in this case study points to an alternative for future in-service teacher training at BMA schools. When compared with the existing practice of sitting in a room and listening to an external expert without much interaction, participating teachers feel that the PLC helps them become more motivated, through experience and knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The contribution to research is the knowledge on the PLC’s implementation for in-service teaching training (as part of workplace learning). Moreover, the PLC should be applied simultaneously with actual teaching and learning through project work. Three notable lessons learned from comparing the effectiveness of the PLC use between BMA and Finnish schools point to the importance of pre- and in-service teacher training with the focus on continuous dialogue and open communication, familiarity with integrated lesson plan and teacher autonomy.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Hanna Kropsu‐Vehkapera, Harri Haapasalo, Janne Harkonen and Risto Silvola

The purpose of this paper is to provide tangible examples of product data management (PDM) practices in large high‐tech companies, and to highlight current challenges.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide tangible examples of product data management (PDM) practices in large high‐tech companies, and to highlight current challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative interview study. First, a PDM system frame was defined to aid analyses. Second, an interview study was carried out in four companies to clarify the practical realisation of PDM, and the current challenges. The interviewees are experts in the field of PDM, currently holding significant related posts in their companies.

Findings

Overall, PDM activities are similar in all companies, however, there is some diversity in the realisation of these practices. PDM related challenges identified in this study are various, strongly influenced by company background and current organisational state.

Research limitations/implications

This paper includes interviews in four companies with different backgrounds, and a workshop, providing a good view on topical issues in the field of PDM. The obtained results could vary to some degree, should the sample size be larger, or especially should the products of the studied companies be less complex.

Practical implications

This paper provides managers and PDM system developers' with a better understanding over the issues that are affecting PDM solution development and on major system requirements, together with relevant insight on current challenges.

Originality/value

The existing literature is relatively scarce in describing the practicalities of PDM. The obtained results highlight the significance of company background influencing the selection of PDM solutions.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Risto Silvola, Olli Jaaskelainen, Hanna Kropsu‐Vehkapera and Harri Haapasalo

This paper aims to provide a framework of the multidimensional concept of one master data. Preconditions required for successful one master data implementation and usage…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework of the multidimensional concept of one master data. Preconditions required for successful one master data implementation and usage in large high‐tech companies are presented and related current challenges companies have today are identified.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is qualitative in nature. First, literature was studied to find out the elements of one master data. Second, an interview study was carried out in eight high‐tech companies and in three expert companies.

Findings

One master data management framework is the composition of data, processes and information systems. Accordingly, the key challenges related to the data are that the definitions of master data are unclear and overall data quality is poor. Challenges on processes related to managing master data are inadequately defined data ownership, incoherent data management practices and lack of continuous data quality practices. Integrations between applications are fundamental challenge to tackle when constructing an holistic one master data.

Research limitations/implications

Studied companies are vanguards in the area of master data management (MDM), providing good views on topical issues in large companies. This study offers a general view of the topic but not describes special company situations as companies need to adapt the presented concepts for their specific case. Significant implication for future research is that MDM can no more be classified and discussed as only an IT problem but it is a managerial challenge which requires structural changes on mindset how issues are handled.

Practical implications

This paper provides a better understanding over the issues which are impacting on the implementation of one master data. The preconditions of implementing and executing one master data are: an organization wide and defined data model; clear data ownership definitions; pro‐active data quality surveillance; data friendly company culture; the clear definitions of roles and responsibilities; organizational structure that supports data processes; clear data process definitions; support from the managerial level; and information systems that utilize the unified data model. The list of preconditions is wide and it also describes the incoherence of current understanding about MDM. This list helps business managers to understand the extent of the concept and to see that master data management is not only an IT issue.

Originality/value

The existing practical research on master data management is limited and, for example, the general challenges have not been reported earlier. This paper offers practical research on one master data. The obtained results illustrates the extent of the topic and the fact that business relevant data management is not only an IT (application) issue but requires understanding of the data, its utilization in organization and supporting practices such as data ownership.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Boris Otto

The paper seeks to investigate the question as to how the business benefits of product data management (PDM) can be assessed and realized. In particular, it aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate the question as to how the business benefits of product data management (PDM) can be assessed and realized. In particular, it aims at understanding the means‐end relationship between PDM and product data on the one hand and a company's business goals on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study research approach. The case of Festo is unique and allows for detailed examination of both the business benefits of PDM and of the inter‐dependencies of various business benefit enablers. Due to the limited amount of scientific knowledge with regard to the management of PDM business benefits, the study is exploratory in nature. The conceptual framework used to guide the study combines business engineering concepts and the business dependency network technique.

Findings

The findings are threefold. First, the paper explicates and details the understanding of the nature of PDM business benefits. Second, it provides insight into the complexity and interdependency of various “means” – such as data ownership, product data standards, for example – and the “ends” of PDM, namely the contribution to a company's business goals. Third, the paper forms the baseline for a comprehensive method supporting the management of PDM business benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Single‐case studies require further validation of findings. Thus, future research should aim at replicating the findings and at developing a comprehensive method for the management of PDM business benefits.

Practical implications

Companies may take up the results as a “blueprint” for their own PDM activities and may reflect their own business benefits against the case of Festo.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first contributions focusing on the means‐end relationship between PDM and product data on the one hand and a company's business goals on the other.

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Article

Hatem Algabroun, Jon Bokrantz, Basim Al-Najjar and Anders Skoogh

This paper presents a concept for digitalised maintenance (DM), maps the conceptualised DM to maintenance problems in industries and highlights challenges that might be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a concept for digitalised maintenance (DM), maps the conceptualised DM to maintenance problems in industries and highlights challenges that might be faced when realizing this concept.

Design/methodology/approach

First, maintenance problems that are faced by the industry are presented, followed by a conceptualisation of DM. Next, a typical operational scenario is used as an exemplification to show system dynamics. The characteristics of this conceptualised DM are then mapped to the identified maintenance problems of industry. Then, interesting initiatives in this domain are highlighted, and finally, the challenges to realize this approach are discussed.

Findings

This paper identified a set of problems related to maintenance in industry. In order to solve current industrial problems, exploit emerging digital technologies and elevate future industries, it will be necessary to develop new maintenance approaches. The mapping between the criteria of DM and maintenance problems shows the potential of this concept and gives a reason to examine it empirically in future work.

Originality/value

This paper aims to help maintenance professionals from both academia and industry to understand and reflect on the problems related to maintenance, as well as to comprehend the requirements of a digitalised maintenance and challenges that may arise.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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