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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Maryam Gholamalizadeh, Narjes Ashouri Mirsadeghi, Samira Rastgoo, Saheb Abbas Torki, Fatemeh Bourbour, Naser Kalantari, Hanieh Shafaei, Zohreh Teymoori, Atiyeh Alizadeh, Alireza Mosavi Jarrahi and Saeid Doaei

Deficiencies or imbalances in dietary fat intake may influence on mental and neurological functions of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study aims to compare…

Abstract

Purpose

Deficiencies or imbalances in dietary fat intake may influence on mental and neurological functions of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study aims to compare body mass index (BMI) and the amount of fatty acids intake in the autistic patients with the comparison group.

Design/methodology/approach

This case-control was carried out on 200 randomly selected children from 5 to 15 years old (100 autistic patients as the case group and 100 healthy children as the comparison group) in Tehran, Iran. The food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to assess the intake of calorie, macronutrients and different types of dietary fatty acids including saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), linoleic acid (LA), α-Linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and trans fatty acids.

Findings

The autistic patients had higher BMI, birth weight and mother’s BMI compared to the comparison group (All p < 0.01). No significant difference was found in the amount of dietary calorie, protein, carbohydrate and total fat intake between two groups. The risk of ASD was associated with higher intake of MUFAs (OR: 3.18, CI%:1.13–4.56, p = 0.04), PUFAs (OR: 4.12, CI95%: 2.01–6.25, p < 0.01) and LA (OR: 4.76, CI95%: 1.34–14.32, p < 0.01).

Originality/value

The autistic children had higher BMI and higher intake of unsaturated fatty acids except for omega-3 fatty acids. Further longitudinal studies are warranted.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Mozhgan Hosseinnezhad and Hanieh Shaki

The purpose of this paper is to study the substituent effect in dye-sensitized solar cells’ (DSSCs) performance. For this end, three new metal organic dyes with DPA structure were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the substituent effect in dye-sensitized solar cells’ (DSSCs) performance. For this end, three new metal organic dyes with DPA structure were synthesized. For investigation of the substituent effect, two different anchoring groups, namely, 1,3-dioxo-1Hbenz[de]isoquinolin-2(3H)-yl)benzenesulfonamides and 1,8-naphthalimide, were used.

Design/methodology/approach

Three organic dyes based on azo were selected, which contain various electron donor groups. Absorption properties of purified dyes were studied in solution and on photoelectrode (TiO2 and ZnO) substrate. DSSCs were prepared to determine the photovoltaic performance of each photosensitizer.

Findings

The results showed that all organic dyes form J-aggregation on the photoanode substrate. Cyclic voltammetry results for all organic dyes ensured an energetically permissible and thermodynamically favorable charge transfer throughout the continuous cycle of photo-electric conversion. The results illustrate conversion efficiencies of cells based on solution Dyes 1, 2 and 3 and TiO2 as 3.44, 4.71 and 4.82 per cent, respectively. The conversion efficiencies of cells based on solution Dye 1, 2 and 3 and ZnO are 3.21, 4.09 and 4.14 per cent, respectively.

Practical implications

In this study, the development of effect of assembling materials, offering improved photovoltaic properties.

Social implications

Organic dye attracts more and more attention because of its low-cost, facile route synthesis and less-hazardous properties.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the effect of anchoring agent and nanostructure on DSSCs performance was investigated for the first time.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Salem Harahsheh, Rafa Haddad and Majd Alshorman

The purpose of this paper is to build a better understanding of the concept of Halal tourism as expressed by Muslim Jordanian tourists who want to comply with the Islamic law. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a better understanding of the concept of Halal tourism as expressed by Muslim Jordanian tourists who want to comply with the Islamic law. The study also examines Jordan as a Halal tourism destination as perceived by those tourists. Implications of marketing Jordan as a Halal tourism destination are among the research questions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is empirical and quantitative in nature with a survey type. The sample of the study is Muslim Jordanians in the cities of Amman and Irbid. Respondents were chosen randomly in shopping malls, gardens and public places. A self-completion questionnaire was administered to collect the data for the research and 920 questionnaires were returned. The data were analysed using descriptive and reliability and explanatory factor analysis in addition to certain tests such as one sample t test and two samples chi-square tests.

Findings

Halal tourism in Jordan is established but needs more enhancements and promotion. Jordan was evaluated positively in 14 Halal services and was unsuccessful in ten others. The motives for Jordanian Muslim tourists who want to comply with the Islamic law, to travel to Halal destinations were destinations that offer Halal-friendly services; to know Islamic religious sites; and to learn about Islamic history. Jordanian tourists were knowledgeable of local and international Halal destinations (78.2 and 67%, respectively). More than half of the sample experienced Halal destinations in Jordan and only 26.4% abroad. From a marketing point of view, the results of this study reveal good awareness of potential Jordanian tourists towards Halal tourism and Halal services. The study revealed that Jordanian Muslim tourists who want to comply with the Islamic law showed significant positive motives to travel Halal tourism destinations. In addition, the study showed statistically significant knowledge and experiences in local Halal destinations, but not in foreign Halal destinations.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of research on Halal tourism in Jordan gives limited in-depth discussion. In addition, the study sample was chosen from two major cities in Jordan; therefore, further research is needed to include a representative sample of the whole country.

Practical implications

The paper includes marketing implications on Halal tourism in Jordan. The authors suggest marketing strategies should be launched to emphasise the importance of Halal tourism and marketing Jordan as Halal tourism destination. The recommendations of this study provide positive and negative results on Jordan as a Halal tourism destination. The negative evaluation of Jordan in terms of Halal services should be redressed by the Jordanian Government and the Jordanian private tourism and hospitality sectors to build a positive image of Jordan as a potential competitive Halal destination for Muslim tourists who want to comply with the Islamic law.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first of its kind, which empirically examined the motives of Jordanian Muslims who want to comply with the Islamic law to travel to Halal tourism destinations as well as evaluating Jordan as a Halal tourism destination. This study fills the gap in literature about Halal tourism in Jordan and presents Halal tourism as one of the alternative forms of tourism of high potential for Jordan to compete in this market segment.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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