Search results

1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Seungmin Nam, Sae-eun Park and Hong-Chul Shin

The purpose of this paper is to estimate an individual’s probability of preservation of the night view of Han-River bridge tax using the contingent valuation method (CVM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate an individual’s probability of preservation of the night view of Han-River bridge tax using the contingent valuation method (CVM) and to present the effects of 4Es on experience economy theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The on-site survey was conducted in the 11 district Han-River parks: Gwangnaru, Jamsil, Ttukseom, Jamwon, Banpo, Yeechon, Yeouido, Mangwon, Nanji, Ganseo and Yanghwa district, including 24 bridges such as Banpo, Olympic bridge during 8-9 pm around the lighting and 9-10 pm peak time of lighting.

Findings

Truncated mean willingness-to-pay indicates that the economic value of the night view of Han-River bridge is 49,575 won (about USA $50) per household, which implies the significance of the preservation value of the night view.

Research limitations/implications

This study sets a hypothetical market, and there are limitations on hypothetical bias of the dichotomous choice CVM. For the future study, a survey with a specific real payment vehicle in an attempt to reduce hypothetical bias can be a tool for the prevention of the overestimation.

Practical implications

Through the study, Seoul city has to invest aggressively on the night view landscape business of Han-River bridge, which can become a landmark and has lots of attraction for tourists. As this study’s core aim was to justify the economic value of the night view of the Han-River bridges, the estimated amount strongly supports the lighting business of the Han-River bridge.

Originality/value

The results of this research may help policy-makers of Han-River to establish practical decisions as to whether improving and preserving the Han-River’s night view lighting business are worth the value.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Ivan V. Small

Purpose: This paper examines emerging consumption patterns in Vietnam’s transportation market, and considers them within broader practices and histories of mobility. I…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper examines emerging consumption patterns in Vietnam’s transportation market, and considers them within broader practices and histories of mobility. I examine how Vietnamese consumers are apprehending the current transportation shift from motorcycles to automobiles and the corresponding societal transformations it foreshadows and remembers.

Design/methodology: Research was conducted between 2013 and 2016 and involved analyses of transportation industry global and regional documents and reports, observations and interviews with users and sellers of motorcycles and automobiles in Vietnam, participant observation and focus groups with drivers and driving schools in Danang and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and discussions with transportation designers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketing professionals.

Findings: Shifts in manufacturing and recent regional and international trade agreements mandating tariff reductions on transportation commodities have been reorienting material and temporal relations to the market. In this transition period when the meaning and valuation of motorcycles are shifting, anticipations of automobiles are paramount.

Originality and value: By analyzing emerging transportation markets in Vietnam, I identify potential collaborative opportunities for stakeholders in academia, industry, and policy to further explore issues of transportation and mobility preferences and developments in Southeast Asia and suggest that this may be a productive arena for lateral learning.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-907-8

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Van-Anh T. Truong

Danang – a heritage gateway, a socioeconomic urban of Central Vietnam – has been known as a livable city, a fantastic destination and a leading position in the Provincial…

1993

Abstract

Purpose

Danang – a heritage gateway, a socioeconomic urban of Central Vietnam – has been known as a livable city, a fantastic destination and a leading position in the Provincial Competitive Index. Since branding Danang appears to be unfocused, it is suggested that the city follow a strategy to meet the shared expectations of stakeholders instead of trying to create separate images toward different audiences. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Therefore, this study selects the bottom-up approach from the viewpoint of Danang students whose requirement is consistent with those of investors, citizens and tourists.

Findings

The finding represents the initial associations of students about Danang as a livable, friendly, dynamic, modern coastal city of tourism and development with many opportunities, potential, attraction, integration and hometown feel. These salient images are exceeded from city characteristics, such as natural endowment, leisure places, beautiful scenes, diverse cuisine, peaceful, suitable living environment, orderly traffic, infrastructure and local people. Besides, crowded caused by development and population growth leads to an unpleasant feeling about narrow spaces but can be overwhelmed by the bustle. Although the result shows the success of Danang in communication, it also figures out the loss of the livable image in local students’ minds.

Practical implications

Hence, Danang must boost the positive effects of tourism development and limit its negative side. University–city cooperation through co-branding strategies can be considered a solution.

Originality/value

The study contributes not only to branding Danang but also to the literature because this is the first complete application of the Zaltman metaphor elicitation technique in city branding.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Laurence Barton

South Korea is set to become the “next giant of Asia”.A strong industrial base, driven workforce and widespread governmentsubsidies have allowed major chaebols

Abstract

South Korea is set to become the “next giant of Asia”. A strong industrial base, driven workforce and widespread government subsidies have allowed major chaebols (conglomerates) to make significant gains in the global arena, but at some expense. Labour unrest is sporadic but serious, environmental abuses are generating consumer outrage, and smaller Korean businesses are concerned about concentrated wealth and power in companies such as Hyundai, Samsung and Lucky‐Gold Star. Discusses the evolution of the Korean economic miracle and offers insight as to potential hurdles in the years ahead if that momentum is to be sustained.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Strategic Business Models: Idealism and Realism in Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-709-2

Article
Publication date: 30 January 2004

Jess Browning and Seung-Hee Lee

The Incheon Region has numerous assets that fall within a Pentaport model.' These include the Incheon International Airport, the Port of Incheon, a coastal industrial…

Abstract

The Incheon Region has numerous assets that fall within a Pentaport model.' These include the Incheon International Airport, the Port of Incheon, a coastal industrial park, free economic zones, a leisure port, and Songdo new town designed to be the future Silicon Valley of Korea. This paper looks at how Northeast Asia trade flows between China and Korea might be enhanced by application of the Pentaport model in making the Incheon region a North East Asian Hub. It looks also at their trade and logistics systems as well as their water borne commerce. It proposes an integrated transportation system for the Yellow Sea Region being beneficial to the economies of the Northeast Asia. It also stresses that innovative technologies for ships, terminals and cargo handling systems should be introduced to develop a competitive short sea shipping system in the region and cooperation among the regional countries will be essential to achieve the final goal. The potential of methods of container shipping is discussed as it might apply to short sea shipping in the Yellow Sea Region that could greatly facilitate Incheon's situation with respect to the broader region in application of the Pentaport model.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

373

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

148

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

189

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Jess Browning

In the 21st Century, a region 's growth and prosperity will depend upon its intermodal transportation infrastructure and its ability to efficiently move goods, materials…

Abstract

In the 21st Century, a region 's growth and prosperity will depend upon its intermodal transportation infrastructure and its ability to efficiently move goods, materials, and people within the system whether it be from origin to destination; from supplier to customer through the various levels of the supply-chain; or from point to point within the system. Planning for the future focuses on improving a region 's intermodal transportation system efficiencies and infrastructure, its connection to other economies, and on the development of logistics institutions and facilities.

With China 's rapidly developing economy and society, record numbers of new modern facilities such as airports, ports, highways, logistics parks and warehouses are being built. Along with this, companies have made extensive investments in information technologies and software to support the tremendous growth that has taken place in the logistics industry. The development and improvement of China's historic inland water transport system is essential to their continued future growth and prosperity. In Korea, past and present National Governments have emphasized the importance of developing a North East Asian Logistics and Business Hub in their region and have worked on strategies, which include water transport, as part of an important national agenda to that end.

This article looks at how trade flows in the Yangtze and Yellow Sea Regions and between China and South Korea might be enhanced by application of improved shipping methods in marine commerce that will promote economic growth in the region. The application of logistics practices and use of barges is explored for the movement of containers on inland and coastal waterways as well as in short sea shipping which could greatly facilitate the region 's situation with respect to future economic growth.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

1 – 10 of 18