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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Byeong-Joon Moon and Han-Mo Oh

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the country-of-origin (COO) effect on overseas distributors’ behaviour in international marketing channels…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the country-of-origin (COO) effect on overseas distributors’ behaviour in international marketing channels. Integrating the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the concepts of country-induced biases, the current study develops an empirically testable model that explains and predicts overseas distributors’ behaviour in international marketing channels.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using primary data stemmed from a survey of channel relationships between exporters and their overseas distributors. Data were collected from 103 distributors in the USA.

Findings

Empirical evidence shows that attitude towards foreign brands, social valuation of the origin of brands, and perceived behavioural control affect overseas distributors’ intention to place foreign brands. In addition, country-induced bias factors – buyer animosity and country-related affect to the origin of manufacture – are considered to be the antecedents of attitude towards foreign brands.

Research limitations/implications

Because this study adopted a cross-sectional design, the limitations of this method can be applied to the study. In addition, because of the research context, the results of the present research may lack generalizability. This manuscript, however, integrated the TPB and the concepts of country-induced biases and addressed the calls for research on the COO effects on overseas distributors’ decision in international marketing channels.

Practical implications

The manuscript suggests that to build positive attitudes towards foreign brands, a firm should focus on promotions through various media in international markets to lower animosity and the perceived risk to the origin of manufacture. In addition, firms with foreign brands need to identify and target a segment that feels comfortable about spending their resources on those brands. Finally, international marketers should focus on creating positive attitudes towards foreign brand goods and proper pricing strategies.

Originality/value

This manuscript fills the knowledge gap of the COO effect on organizational buyer behaviour in international marketing channels.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Han-Mo Oh, Dennis B. Arnett and Sang Bong An

A appreciable number of exporters have successfully developed their markets in foreign countries although they have little prior experience in those countries. Advocating…

Abstract

Purpose

A appreciable number of exporters have successfully developed their markets in foreign countries although they have little prior experience in those countries. Advocating that indirect learning plays a crucial role in explaining this phenomenon, the purpose of this paper is attempted to investigate whether and how learning indirectly from competitors and interfirm relationships enables exporters to successful expand their business into foreign markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the knowledge-based theory of the firm and the late-mover advantage theory, the authors developed an empirically testable model that explains and predicts the effects of indirect learning on the success of export market expansion. The model was tested using a complied archival data set in regard to exporters’ market expansion events and international accounting. The sampling frame was the events of Korean exporters’ market expansion.

Findings

Empirical evidence shows that exporters’ indirect learning from domestic, local, global competitors and from interfirm relationships influence their success of market expansion. In addition, indirect learning from domestic rivals and from interfirm relationships has a more positive effect on the success of expansion into emerging markets than into developed markets.

Research limitations/implications

Because the authors employed an event-study method, the limitations of this method can be applied to the present research. In addition, because of the empirical context, the results of the research may lack generalizability. The authors, however, provided an understanding how an exporter can succeed in a foreign market specifically when it has lack of direct experience in the market.

Practical implications

The results of the current research suggested that an exporter should try to learn from local, domestic, and global rivals experienced in a foreign market in order to succeed in the market. In addition, exporters should be affiliated with business groups or partnerships because these affiliations can strengthen the information-sharing mechanisms. Moreover, an exporter should focus first on learning from local rivals and then domestic rivals in order to develop proper expansion strategies. Finally, an exporter should attempt to more actively learn from rivals and interfirm relationships when it targets an emerging market than a developed market.

Originality/value

Prior studies have emphasized the effects of a firm’s direct learning on market development success. The authors, however, filled a knowledge gap of the impacts of learning in two aspects. First, the authors provided an understanding of the effects of indirect learning on market expansion success. Second, the authors demonstrated these effects in the context of export.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Teresina Torre and Daria Sarti

This chapter aims to build a systematization of the current theoretical and empirical academic contributions on smart working (SW) in the organization studies domain and…

Abstract

This chapter aims to build a systematization of the current theoretical and empirical academic contributions on smart working (SW) in the organization studies domain and to examine which are the main paths that researchers are concerning themselves with, with specific attention being paid to the new meaning that the work itself has acquired in the model proposed by SW. Particular consideration is devoted to an analysis of the characteristics of the present debate on this construct and the meaning of SW, identifying two different – and contrasting – approaches: one considers it as a totally new concept; the other is notable for its continuity with previous arrangements such as telework. Further, some relevant concepts, strictly related to that of SW in working environments are considered. In the last part of the chapter, some key points for further research are proposed to create stimuli for discussion in the community of organization studies and HRM scholars and among practitioners, given from the perspective of deepening the change in progress, the relevance for which there is general consensus.

Details

HRM 4.0 For Human-Centered Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-535-2

Keywords

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