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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Hamish Lowden

Considers the effects on women of rejection by business andsociety. Recommends changes both in personal outlooks and in businesssociety cultures. Male dominance that…

Abstract

Considers the effects on women of rejection by business and society. Recommends changes both in personal outlooks and in business society cultures. Male dominance that prevents progress for women in organizations can lead to their taking up business ownership in their own right. Discontinuous changes are foreseen: successful accomplishment in this environment requires that positive learning attitudes are adopted alongside appropriate training to cope with new circumstances. Provides examples and case studies illustrating how women acquire confidence to make their way in a manmade world. Discusses future work patterns and their effects on business and society. Suggests changing roles for the sexes with emphasis on women′s and men′s joint contribution to an improved culture and economy.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive…

Abstract

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since it is based on complaints. It seems to be a matter of time before the Quebec Government passes a pro‐active legislation on pay equity and, in doing so, it will likely draw its inspiration from the Pay Equity Act (PEA) passed by the Ontario Government in 1987. One of PEAs important features is the emphasis on institutional structures and practices in determining the appropriate unit for the purpose of achieving pay equity. In practice, such units will often match up with the usual job families (e.g. clerical or office vs production jobs). However, the historical development of jobs families is intertwined with the evolution of occupational segregation between men and women in the labour markets.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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