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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Hamid R. Jamali and Pria Shahbaztabar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between internet filtering, emotions and information-seeking behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between internet filtering, emotions and information-seeking behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 15 postgraduate students at an Iranian university participated in the study which involved a questionnaire, search tasks with think aloud narratives, and interviews.

Findings

Internet content filtering results in some changes in the information-seeking behaviour of users. Users who face website blocking use a variety of methods to bypass filtering, mostly by using anti-filter software. Filtering encourages users to use channels such as social networking services to share resources and it increases the use of library material by some of the users. Users who face filtering during their search are more likely to visit more pages of results and click on more hits in the results, unlike users who do not experience filtering who rarely go past the first page. Blocking users’ access to content stimulates their curiosity and they become more determined to access the content. In terms of the affective aspect, filtering causes several negative emotions (e.g. anger, disgust, sadness and anxiety) and the main reason for these emotions is not the inability to access information but the feeling of being controlled and not having freedom.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to a small number of postgraduate students in social sciences and not generalisable to all user groups. The implication is that in countries where filtering is used, libraries can play an important role in serving users and reducing users negative emotions, especially if libraries can take advantage of technologies such as social media for their services.

Originality/value

This is first study to address the effects of internet filtering on information-seeking behaviour and emotions. The study shows that internet filtering causes negative emotions and results in some changes in information-seeking behaviour.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Zohreh Dehghani, Ebrahim Afshar, Hamid R. Jamali and Mohammad Ali Nematbakhsh

The aim of this paper is to investigate contextual information that has an impact on the process of selection and decision making in recommender systems (RSs) in digital libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate contextual information that has an impact on the process of selection and decision making in recommender systems (RSs) in digital libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a grounded theory method of qualitative research, semi‐structured interviews were carried out with 22 information specialists, and IT and computer engineering students and professors. Data resulting from interviews were analysed in two stages using open coding, followed by axial and selective coding.

Findings

The central idea (concept) developed in this study, named scientific research ground (SRG), is an information ground users step into with scholarly purposes. Within SRG they start interacting with information systems. SRG has contexts which situate users in a range of situations while interacting with information systems. Users' characteristics such as purpose, activity, literacy, mental state, expectations, and assumptions, occupational and social status are some contexts that should be taken into account for making a recommendation.

Research limitations/implications

This study sought to explore contextual information in the academic community and the academic contextual information cannot be generalized to RSs in other environments such as e‐commerce.

Practical implications

Identifying and implementing contextual information in information systems can help make better recommendations as well as improve interaction between users and information systems.

Originality/value

Based on the SRG idea and its contexts, a multi‐layer contextual model for a recommender system is proposed.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Hamid R. Jamali

Abstract

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Hamid R. Jamali and David Nicholas

This paper seeks to investigate the reading behaviour of scientists from an intradisciplinary perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the reading behaviour of scientists from an intradisciplinary perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Different aspects of reading behaviour were studied including the amount of reading, the sources of reading, and the impact of factors such as age, academic status, academic activities and methods used for identifying articles on reading behaviour. The data were collected through a survey of 114 physicists and astronomers (faculty members and PhD students) at University College London. A total of 56 interviews were also conducted with PhD students and faculty members.

Findings

The results revealed intradisciplinary differences within physics and astronomy in terms of reading behaviour. The study showed that recently published articles account for a large proportion of the readings. Age and academic status have an influence on the age of papers read. The amount of reading is influenced by the type of activities academics conduct, meaning those who spend more time teaching read fewer papers and those who spend more time doing research read more papers.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to look at intradisciplinary differences within a single discipline and reveals the impact of some task‐related and information‐seeking factors on reading behaviour.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Hamid R. Jamali and Saeid Asadi

This paper aims to demonstrate the role that the Google general search engine plays in the information‐seeking behaviour of scientists, particularly physicists and astronomers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the role that the Google general search engine plays in the information‐seeking behaviour of scientists, particularly physicists and astronomers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a mixed‐methods study including 56 semi‐structured interviews, a questionnaire survey of 114 respondents (47 per cent response rate) and the use of information‐event cards to collect critical incident data. The study was conducted at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University College, London.

Findings

The results show that Google is the tool most used for problem‐specific information seeking. The results also show the growing reliance of scientists on general search engines, particularly Google, for finding scholarly articles. Initially, finding scholarly articles was a by‐product of general searching for information rather than focused searches for papers. However, a growing number of articles read by scientists are identified through the Google general search engine and, as scientists are becoming more aware of the quantity of scholarly papers searchable by Google, they are increasingly relying on Google for finding scholarly literature.

Research limitations/implications

As the only fields covered in the study were physics and astronomy, and the research participants were sourced from just one department of one institution, caution should be taken in generalising the findings.

Originality/value

The data are based on a mixed‐methods in‐depth study of scientists' information‐seeking behaviour which sheds some light on a question raised in past studies relating to the reason for the high number of articles identified through Google.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Hamid R. Jamali

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Hamid R. Jamali and David Nicholas

The study aims to examines two aspects of information seeking behaviour of physicists and astronomers including methods applied for keeping up‐to‐date and methods used for…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examines two aspects of information seeking behaviour of physicists and astronomers including methods applied for keeping up‐to‐date and methods used for finding articles. The relationship between academic status and research field of users with their information seeking behaviour was investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using a questionnaire survey of PhD students and staff of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University College London; 114 people (47.1 per cent response rate) participated in the survey.

Findings

The study reveals differences among subfields of physics and astronomy in terms of information‐seeking behaviour, highlights the need for and the value of looking at narrower subject communities within disciplines for a deeper understanding of the information behaviour of scientists.

Originality/value

The study is the first to deeply investigate intradisciplinary dissimilarities of information‐seeking behaviour of scientists in a discipline. It is also an up‐to‐date account of information seeking behaviour of physicists and astronomers.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

David Nicholas, Ian Rowlands, Paul Huntington, Hamid R. Jamali and Patricia Hernández Salazar

The purpose of this paper is to present some of the results of the project “Evaluating the usage and impact of e‐journals in the UK”. The particular research reported here…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present some of the results of the project “Evaluating the usage and impact of e‐journals in the UK”. The particular research reported here evaluated the use of the ScienceDirect journals database with regard to Life Sciences, Economics, Chemistry, Earth & Environmental Sciences and Physics by ten major UK research institutions. The aim of the study is to investigate researchers' digital behaviour, and to ascertain whether their use and behaviours varied by subjects and disciplines, or in relation to the institutions in which they worked.

Design/methodology/approach

Raw logs for ScienceDirect were obtained for the period January to April 2007, were subject to deep log techniques and analysed using the Software Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).

Findings

Typically, 5 per cent of the ScienceDirect journals viewed accounted for a third to half of all use. A high proportion of researchers entered the ScienceDirect site via a third‐party site, and this was especially so in the case of the Life Sciences and in the highest‐ranked research institutions. There were significant institutional and subject differences in information‐seeking behaviour. In the most research‐intensive institutions, per capita journal use was highest and their users spent much less time on each visit. There were significant differences of the order of 100‐300 per cent in the age of material viewed between subjects and institutions. Just four months after ScienceDirect content was opened to Google indexing, a third of traffic to the site's Physics journals came via that route.

Originality/value

The research is one of the very few studies to investigate subject and institutional differences with regard to the information seeking and use of UK researchers, something UK academic librarians should particularly welcome.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

David Nicholas, Paul Huntington, Hamid R. Jamali, Ian Rowlands and Maggie Fieldhouse

This study provides evidence on the actual information‐seeking behaviour of students in a digital scholarly environment, not what they thought they did. It also compares…

Abstract

Purpose

This study provides evidence on the actual information‐seeking behaviour of students in a digital scholarly environment, not what they thought they did. It also compares student information‐seeking behaviour with that of other academic communities, and, in some cases, for practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered as part of CIBER's ongoing Virtual Scholar programme. In particular log data from two digital journals libraries, Blackwell Synergy and OhioLINK, and one e‐book collection (Oxford Scholarship Online) are utilized.

Findings

The study showed a distinctive form of information‐seeking behaviour associated with students and differences between them and other members of the academic community. For example, students constituted the biggest users in terms of sessions and pages viewed, and they were more likely to undertake longer online sessions. Undergraduates and postgraduates were the most likely users of library links to access scholarly databases, suggesting an important “hot link” role for libraries.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on the actual (rather than perceived) information‐seeking behaviour of students. The study fills that gap.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Abdolrasoul Jowkar, Fereshteh Didegah and Ali Gazni

This paper's aim is to examine the citation impact of Iranian funded research publications and compare it with research which received no funding.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to examine the citation impact of Iranian funded research publications and compare it with research which received no funding.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a bibliometric method, the study investigated 80,300 Iranian publications published from 2000 to 2009 in SCI‐EXPANDED to discover the percentage of funded publications and to determine the citation impact of these publications in comparison with unfunded ones.

Findings

The results of the study showed that around 12.5 per cent of Iranian publications were funded and the number of funded publications has increased dramatically over the last four years. The citation impact of funded publications was higher in almost all of the subject fields. The highest number of funded publications belonged to the universities subordinate to The Ministry of Science, Research and Technology.

Originality/value

The impact and quality of research is influenced by different factors, for instance receiving funding and research facilities. As this issue has not been previously examined in Iran, the present study determines whether funding can influence the impact of Iranian research.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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