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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Mohammed Borhandden Musah, Hairuddin Mohd Ali, Shafeeq Hussain Vazhathodi al-Hudawi, Lokman Mohd Tahir, Khadijah Binti Daud, Hamdan Bin Said and Naail Mohammed Kamil

This study aims to investigate whether organisational climate (OC) predicts academic staff performance at Malaysian higher education institutions (HEIs). The study equally aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether organisational climate (OC) predicts academic staff performance at Malaysian higher education institutions (HEIs). The study equally aims at validating the psychometric properties of OC and workforce performance (WFP) constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires were administered to 800 academic staff of eight selected HEIs. Principal component analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, full-fledged structural equation modelling and multiple regression analysis were performed to explore the underlying factors and test the factorial validity of the constructs.

Findings

The analysis yielded a five-factor index for the OC construct, whereas the WFP construct comprised two factors. The findings reveal a strong predictive causal effect between OC and WFP. These results suggest that establishing a positive OC enhances academic staff performance. Furthermore, the hypothesised model adds new knowledge to the literature of OC, from the Malaysian context, which could be used to predict WFP at the tertiary level.

Practical implications

The study concludes by discussing the theoretical and practical implications of the findings for HEIs.

Originality/value

This paper makes a significant contribution to the understanding of how OC could be used as an effective instrument in improving academic staff performance in the context of Malaysian HEIs.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Virginia Bodolica, Martin Spraggon and Nada Khaddage-Soboh

Extant crisis response literature focuses on the survival and adaptation efforts of organizations, leaving the opportunity of deploying more proactive market-shaping strategies…

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Abstract

Purpose

Extant crisis response literature focuses on the survival and adaptation efforts of organizations, leaving the opportunity of deploying more proactive market-shaping strategies unexplored. This paper aims to examine the early strategic responses deployed by air-travel services players for navigating through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a qualitative case study and grounded theory methods, this research analyzes how DUBZ – a purposefully selected company operating in the air-travel services sector in the emirate of Dubai (UAE) – responded to the coronavirus disruption.

Findings

Using this unique case as a basis for grounded theorizing, a framework was developed for understanding how air-travel service providers can effectively navigate through the crisis – the guard-potentiate-shape model. The advanced model suggests that in times of disruption, industry players should adopt several strategies to: guard against failure; potentiate innovative change; and shape the future design of air-travel services. An outcome of forward-looking shaping strategies that may define the new post-pandemic normal in the air-travel services sector constitutes the idea of “scattered/diffused airports” with a modified design of airport services architecture.

Originality/value

The insights from the grounded theoretical framework contribute to both the empirical research on crisis management and the nascent literature on market-shaping strategies. Air-travel services organizations may learn how to increase their resilience and build new industry normalcy in the post-disruption period.

迈向后COVID-19时代航空旅游服务行业的常态:用于危机导航的GPS(超前部署)模型

目的

先前的危机应对研究集中于组织的生存和适应性工作, 留下开发出部署更积极的市场塑造策略尚未探索的机会。本文的目的是研究空中旅游服务公司为应对COVID-19大流行而采取的早期战略应对措施。

设计/方法/诉求

利用定性的案例研究方法, 本研究分析了在迪拜酋长国(UAE)的航空旅游服务行业中特定的公司如何应对冠状病毒的破坏。

发现

使用这个独特的案例作为理论基础, 开发了一个扎根的理论框架, 用于理解航空旅行服务业者如何有效地渡过危机-GPS(超前部署)模型。先进的模型表明, 在混乱时期, 业者应采取多种策略, 以(1)预防失败, (2)加强创新变革以及(3)塑造航空旅游服务的未来设计。前瞻性塑造策略的结果可能定义了航空旅游服务领域后疫情时代的新常态, 构成了“零散的机场”的概念, 并修改了机场服务体系结构的设计。

创意/价值

来自先进框架的见解有助于进行危机管理的实证研究以及有关战略市场塑造的新兴文献。更广泛地讲, 航空旅行服务组织可能会学习如何在灾后时期提高抵御力并建立新的行业常态。

La industria de los servicios de viajes aéreos posterior al COVID-19: El modelo GPS (Proteger-Potenciar-Modelar) para la navegación en situaciones de crisis

Propósito

La investigación previa de respuesta a crisis se ha centrado en los esfuerzos de supervivencia y adaptación de las organizaciones, dejando sin explorar la oportunidad de implementar estrategias más proactivas para modelar el mercado. Este documento tiene como objetivo examinar las primeras respuestas estratégicas desplegadas por los actores de los servicios de viajes aéreos para navegar a través de la pandemia de COVID-19.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Basándose en una metodología de estudio de caso cualitativo, esta investigación analiza cómo una empresa seleccionada a propósito, que opera en el sector de servicios de viajes aéreos en el emirato de Dubai (EAU), respondió a la disrupción del coronavirus.

Resultados

Utilizando este caso único como base para la teorización, se desarrolló un marco teórico fundamentado para comprender cómo los proveedores de servicios de viajes aéreos pueden navegar eficazmente a través de una crisis: el modelo GPS (Proteger-Potenciar-Modelar). El modelo avanzado sugiere que, en tiempos de disrupción, los actores de la industria deben adoptar una serie de estrategias para (1) protegerse contra fallas, (2) potenciar un cambio innovador y (3) modelar el diseño futuro de los servicios de viajes aéreos. Un resultado de las estrategias de formación prospectivas que pueden definir la nueva normalidad pos-pandémica en el sector de los servicios de viajes aéreos constituye la idea de "aeropuertos dispersos" con un diseño modificado de la arquitectura de los servicios aeroportuarios.

Originalidad/valor

Los conocimientos del marco avanzado contribuyen tanto a la investigación empírica sobre la gestión de crisis como a la literatura incipiente sobre la modelación estratégica del mercado. En términos más generales, las organizaciones de servicios de viajes aéreos pueden aprender cómo aumentar su resiliencia y construir una nueva normalidad en la industria en el período posterior a la disrupción.

Expert briefing
Publication date: 29 December 2017

Succession in Gulf Arab states.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Virginia Bodolica and Martin Spraggon

Despite the recent increase in scholarly interest on organizational decline, the theoretical and empirical inquiry into this topic remains largely disintegrated. Therefore…

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Abstract

Purpose

Despite the recent increase in scholarly interest on organizational decline, the theoretical and empirical inquiry into this topic remains largely disintegrated. Therefore, leaders in corporate settings who are confronted with critical strategic management challenges are ill equipped for orchestrating successful turnaround attempts to secure the revival of their organizations. The purpose of this paper is to bridge this gap in the organizational decline literature.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors undertake a systematic review of the specialized literature with the purpose of providing an updated account of the extant knowledge base and assisting top managers in their efforts of corporate recovery.

Findings

Drawing upon the insights from a number of prior literature reviews and the evidence provided in the sampled studies, this research framework offers an in-depth discussion of major antecedents, consequences and moderators of organizational decline.

Originality/value

The authors seek to make a discerned contribution to the field by advancing a multi-domain agenda for future research that may animate the continuous debate on the most effective strategies and leadership practices for surviving firm decline.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Maryam Al Shehhi, Khadeegha Alzouebi and Ahmed Ankit

At this juncture, one needs to analyze the problem statement and the purpose of this article. It is an undeniable fact that the schools are no longer classroom-oriented teaching…

Abstract

Purpose

At this juncture, one needs to analyze the problem statement and the purpose of this article. It is an undeniable fact that the schools are no longer classroom-oriented teaching but demands a higher level of teaching that will help students enhance their maximum potential. Having instructional based knowledge, knowledge of policies both in national and regional level and implementing them on time is not adequate for their success. Research in this area has prompted academicians to delve further into factors that can convert a manager to an instructional leader with the ability to provide a synthesis of responsibilities, which might help in positively impacting the learning outcome of the students (Wendorf-Heldt, 2009). School principals have moved into a different paradigm, and no longer being a good manager is sufficient to run a school. Academicians have been engaged to study the subject from various dimensions, and yet there remains a certain amount of uncertainty about the qualities of being an effective leader in a school (Greenockle, 2010). Question arises that what are the most effective qualities that a school principal must possess – is it the ability to motivate, inspire or communicate the vision and mission of the school? Stakeholders have changed too, they are now more direct, more outspoken and more demanding than ever before and these critical elements have to be understood well by the principal who is connected to a larger community of people (Greenockle, 2010). It is therefore, becoming imperative that the importance of emotional intelligence (EI) is understood by the educational policymakers who need to advocate adequate training and understanding of school principals in directing the advancement of their EI. Increasing understanding and the importance of EI of school leaders and its relation to their years of experience and school impact thus become a significant area to study, mainly in the context of UAE.

Design/methodology/approach

Research design is described as the study framework, which helps researchers to follow procedures during the process of collecting, analyzing and reporting data (Creswell, 2012). Since the main objective of the study was to assess whether a correlation exists between the EI of school principals and the school environment as perceived by teachers, the study is categorized under a quantitative correlational design. This study design focuses mainly on collecting numerical data and determining the relationship between two quantifiable variables (McBurney and White, 2009). It is worth mentioning that there are two types of variables called “independent” and “dependent’ variables. Johnson and Christensen (2008) differentiated between these two types of variables by defining an “independent’ variable as “a variable that is presumed to cause a change in another variable”, while a “dependent” variable is “a variable that is presumed to be influenced by one or more independent variables” (p. 39). Based on these definitions, it can be said that the EI of school principals is the independent variable, while the dependent variable is the school environment.

Findings

The levels of emotional intelligence of school principals in UAE public schools. The first objective of the study is to identify the EI levels of school principals. The results show that the EI scores of principals range from 32.53 (consider development) to 100.15 (high average score) with a mean of 67.21 (consider development). As shown in Figure 1, 55 % of principals score in the “Consider Development” range, 40 % are in the “Consider Improvement” category, and only 5 % are in the “High Average Score” range. Interestingly, no principals score in the “Low Average Score”, “Competent”, “Strength” and “Significant Strength” range. The mean of EI (67.21) is categorized under the “Consider Development” range which means that the level of EI of principals is low. In other words, principals are unable to recognize and express emotions, use emotions to assist problem solving, understand the emotions of others, or manage and control their own emotions. As explained in the MSCEIT user manual, scoring low in the MSCEIT indicates that those principals have a shortfall in their EI abilities which indeed may have a negative impact on the workplace and hold principals back from performing their roles effectively (Mayer et al., 2002). This has been supported by the literature as West-Burnham (2002) stated that those with low levels of EI might not become effective leaders as they are unable to interact effectively with others, enhance effective collaboration, or create a positive school climate that promotes effective learning. This is a key finding which needs to be addressed by the MoE policymakers to improve principals’ low levels of EI.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, the researcher applied the quantitative research method in which the MSCEIT framework was used to measure principals’ EI levels and the R-SLEQ to measure the SC as perceived by teachers. However, relying only on quantitative assessment tools may not be enough to describe the levels of EI of the principals. Therefore, it is recommended that future research endeavors to incorporate qualitative research methods such as interviews and observations to elaborate more on the EI levels of principals and get a broader picture of the principal state. Using both quantitative and qualitative assessment tools, according to Creswell (2012), would ensure the accuracy and credibility of the study, increase trustworthiness, enhance the verification process and get a deeper understanding of the topic. Another limitation in this research is related to the sample size. In this study, the sample included twenty school principals and ten teachers working with each principal from the RAK education zone. This was due to the restricted number of schools that were available to study in RAK and the difficulty of accessing schools outside RAK. For future research, it is recommended that researchers use a larger sample size from different emirates as this would increase the accuracy and reliability of the research, help to generalize the research findings on a large scale, lend support to the findings of this study and nurture the existing research on the relationship between EI and leadership effectiveness.

Practical implications

The practical implications include EI skills in the principals’ recruitment process. The recruitment system of school principals is a pivotal process that puts in place the most qualified and skilled principals who strongly fit the needs of the Ministry of Education (MoE). Currently, the recruitment system of school principals in the UAE relies on academic qualifications as candidates for school principalship are required to hold a bachelor’s degree in education, however, there is no test that measures their EI skills. According to Serrat (2017), qualifications alone cannot indicate principals’ effectiveness as some of them may have high academic ratings yet are lacking social and interpersonal skills. For this reason, it is recommended that MoE policymakers add the skills of EI to the recruit system of school principals and include these skills in the licensing project which has been recently launched to develop principals' abilities and skills. Such abilities and skills, as argued by Lunenburg and Ornstein (2004), can determine leaders’ effectiveness. This is evident as this study proves that highly emotionally intelligent principals do have a positive impact on the school environment, and with the current emphasis of the MoE on leading change, EI should become more critical.

Social implications

Provision of professional development for school principals. Principals, as argued by Cook (2006) are change agents who hold the main accountability for creating and sustaining a positive school climate for stakeholders. Thus, they should be well-qualified and skilled to deal with different emotions of teachers and lead change effectively. Nevertheless, the results of this study indicate that 95 of principals scored low in the MSCEIT which indeed led to a negative impact on the school climate in their schools. To improve the levels of EI, principals need to be aware of emotional knowledge which is defined as ‘learning about emotions’ (Greenberg et al., 1995). This can be achieved by implementing professional development and training programs that would help to increase principals’ effectiveness as school leaders. As argued by Moore (2009), such professional development can promote empathy, self-awareness and flexibility as well as help principals acquire the necessary knowledge, skills and practices to restructure and redesign schools.

Originality/value

The overall aim of the study was to explore whether a correlation exists between the levels of EI of school principals and the SC as perceived by teachers. Other objectives were to identify the EI levels of school principals and investigate whether the number of years of experience as a school principal is correlated to the levels of EI. It was found that principals have low levels of EI as revealed by the MSCEIT scores. The findings also urge that continued research in this field will be beneficial for the schools and have a deeper and positive impact on the student’s achievements. The recruitment process of the principals can undergo alterations and adequate awareness and training can be built on decision making abilities, responding to the environmental stimuli, relationship building and the ability of the principal to motivate (Moore, 2009). The multi-faceted requirement of a school principal typically judged by student’s achievements seems to reckon with the theories of EI and therefore warrants further investigation in this neglected yet a vital area. Leading any institution is a stressful and emotionally laden activity. Hence school leaders need to be capacitated on issues related to emotions and school leadership. This paper concludes with the recommendation that leadership development programs for pre-service and in-service school principals should consider including sessions on EI.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Mariam Swalehe Said, Hairul Azlan Annuar and Hamdino Bin Hamdan

The purpose of this paper is to assess the financial sustainability of Islamic Saving Credit Corporative Society (SACCOS) and the factor(s) affecting their financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the financial sustainability of Islamic Saving Credit Corporative Society (SACCOS) and the factor(s) affecting their financial sustainability in the Tanzanian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set used in this study comes from four SACCOS audited financial reports from the year 2010 to 2014 and from interviews with SACCOS’s management.

Findings

The study found that the IMFIs in Tanzania are not financially sustainable. Additionally, having responsible staff members, regular review of financial guidelines, education to members, cooperation between employees and management and staff training are found to be highly contributing factors towards SACCOS’s financial sustainability. Moreover, the findings reveal that depending on the single source of income, i.e., charges on members contributed much in these SACCOS’s not being financially sustainable.

Research limitations/implications

Only two available registered Islamic SACCOS was used. Additionally, conventional SACCOS have been in service provision for a long time as compared to Islamic ones; hence, caution must be taken for comparison purposes.

Practical implications

Based on these findings, the Islamic SACCOS needs to initiate productive projects that can enable them to have other income sources apart from charges on members.

Originality/value

This study traces the financial trend of Islamic SACCOS in Tanzania since its establishment in 2010. Such trace enables Islamic SACCOS and other stakeholders to be aware on the financial progress of Islamic SACCOS and act accordingly to ensure sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Martin Spraggon and Virginia Bodolica

Upon completion of this case study analysis, students should be able to: perform a detailed diagnosis of an entrepreneurial venture, applying relevant strategic management tools…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Upon completion of this case study analysis, students should be able to: perform a detailed diagnosis of an entrepreneurial venture, applying relevant strategic management tools and techniques; evaluate the effectiveness of managerial actions and decisions at different stages of organizational lifecycle; and demonstrate the importance of strategic adaptation of organizations through the deployment of viable decision-making skills.

Case overview/synopsis

This case describes the story of Multimedia Ventures, a small business located in the UAE that provides media solutions to cleaning and hygiene-related technology sectors. The company was founded through a partnership arrangement and later transformed into a family enterprise. The case study illustrates the firm operations from its grass root stages to being a well-known name in the cleaning industry, both within the Middle East and beyond. Since its establishment in 2008, Multimedia Ventures has embarked on a path of continuous growth with the ambition of globalizing activities to offer various media solutions to customers worldwide. To achieve this objective, the company engaged in collaborations with many international partners to facilitate the exchange of expertise and increase the scale of operations. Yet, the Managing Director of Multimedia Ventures, Mr Arjun Khatri, was currently faced with two difficult strategic decisions that were critically important for the future development of his enterprise.

Complexity academic level

Undergraduate courses.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Virginia Bodolica and Martin Spraggon

Reflect on the influence of different lifecycle stages on the strategy of a family business; evaluate the impact of family, industry and company dynamics on the evolution of a…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Reflect on the influence of different lifecycle stages on the strategy of a family business; evaluate the impact of family, industry and company dynamics on the evolution of a family firm; assess the impact of ownership, governance and succession considerations on the sustainability of a family firm; and develop decision-making skills to overcome specific dilemmas and secure the family business longevity.

Case overview/synopsis

Five industries, three generations and one family business. What started off as an entrepreneur’s ambition, Almajid Limited has proven itself to a sustainable source of revenue and a diverse portfolio of businesses for multiple generations of a Saudi Arabian family. This case study offers an exclusive opportunity to follow the tumultuous journey of a Saudi family business and analyze the different phases of its evolution over seven decades and three generations. In particular, the case aims to highlight the complexities surrounding the management of a family firm and illustrate how various lifecycle stages stemming from a number of areas (e.g. family, company, industry, ownership and governance) simultaneously influence the family business strategy. Being deeply embedded in the context of Saudi Arabia, the case unveils the unique challenges of managing a family business in a conservative cultural setting. The case study is divided into four parts, with each of them putting the emphasis on a different lifecycle area of significance for the evolution of the family business. Each part culminates with the identification of an area-relevant dilemma that needs to be addressed for the family firm to be able to move into the next stage of its development. Part A focuses on the family area or axis, the Part B on the industry axis, Part C on the company axis, while Part D is based on the sustainability axis, which embraces as many as three dilemmas in relation to the ownership, governance and succession in the family firm. Moreover, each part incorporates a timeline of critical events that contributed to the emergence of a specific dilemma and a culturally-rooted anime that helps the readers visualize the story, picture somebody else’s reality, and empathize with the key protagonists of the case to achieve optimal decision-making.

Complexity academic level

Graduate audience: Master of Business Administration or Master of Global Entrepreneurial Management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2020

George Marachly, Virginia Bodolica and Martin Spraggon

Learning outcomes of this study are as follows: conduct a comprehensive organizational diagnosis to uncover the peculiarities of managing a family business; evaluate the spirit of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes of this study are as follows: conduct a comprehensive organizational diagnosis to uncover the peculiarities of managing a family business; evaluate the spirit of innovation of the new generation to drive rejuvenation initiatives in the family firm; reflect on the concept of stealth innovation and its manifestation in the context of transgenerational entrepreneurship; and assess the effectiveness of managerial decision-making and provide recommendations for securing the sustainability of a family firm.

Case overview/synopsis

This case starts with the entrepreneurial beginnings of Jack Misakyan, who transformed the small blacksmith venture of his father into a large and profitable family enterprise with operations across different countries and industrial sectors. Since the establishment of Misakyan Technical Solutions (MTS), Jack relied on the help of his brothers, Ara and Hovik, who have joined the ranks of owners and managers to drive the expansion efforts of the family firm. Over the years, the brothers were successful in pursuing a strategy of continuous growth and diversification by taking advantage of opportunities in several industries and regions of the world. They opened branches in Kuwait, Syria, the United Arab Emirates and Armenia, and operated in industries of heavy-truck maintenance, pharmaceuticals, marine shipping, construction materials, quarry and restauration. Yet, four decades after its launch, the company was entering in a phase of stagnation and was in need for entrepreneurial rejuvenation. The members of the third generation, who have recently joined the family firm, believed that it was their obligation to restructure the operations and revive the entrepreneurial spirit in their fathers’ organization. Moreover, after several months of market analysis and investigation, two of the cousins came up with a new business idea that was pursued entirely in a stealth mode. By describing the strategic events and family dynamics that shaped the evolution of MTS over time, the case offers an opportunity to assess the effectiveness of managerial decision-making and provide recommendations for ensuring the longevity of the family enterprise.

Complexity academic level

Upper undergraduate classes.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2024

Rachid Jabbouri, Yann Truong and Helmi Issa

We explore how NGO’s local entrepreneurial initiatives to empower women entrepreneurs can compensate for weak state policies for women in a context of male-dominated…

Abstract

Purpose

We explore how NGO’s local entrepreneurial initiatives to empower women entrepreneurs can compensate for weak state policies for women in a context of male-dominated socio-cultural norms.

Design/methodology/approach

We use the case of a local entrepreneurial initiative launched in the Atlas region of Morocco, the Empowering Women in the Atlas Initiative (EWA). We collected data through 51 semi-structured interviews of women entrepreneurs in three cooperatives which exploit the natural resources of their region to establish a social venture. Our data are longitudinal as they were collected at two time periods: before and after the initiative.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that local entrepreneurial initiatives can have a significant impact on rural women entrepreneurs’ empowerment. The improved perception of empowerment has not only helped them develop capacities to leverage the business opportunities linked to the natural resources of their region, but it has also increased their status and role within their family and community.

Practical implications

We make recommendations for policymakers to encourage this type of initiative to compensate for the absence of supporting policies geared toward women.

Originality/value

Our study is one of the first to look at empowerment as a policy instrument to develop women entrepreneurial activities in rural areas of developing countries. Our paper uses a unique hierarchical perspective and a multidimensional framework for analyzing social cooperative ventures and rural women entrepreneurs’ empowerment. Our paper unravels interesting insights for women entrepreneurs’ narration strategies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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