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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Syeda Nazish Zahra Bukhari, Salmi Mohd Isa and Goh Yen Nee

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the determinants of purchase intention of Halal vaccination and compare the results between Muslim consumers in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the determinants of purchase intention of Halal vaccination and compare the results between Muslim consumers in Malaysia and Pakistan. It focuses on analyzing the influence of various factors on the purchase intention of Halal vaccination and determining whether the relationships are significantly different in the two Muslim-majority countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the extended theory of planned behavior and self-congruity theory. The variable of religiosity was added with the three variables of the theory of planned behavior, i.e. attitude toward Halal vaccinations, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. It shows the congruity between Muslim consumer and Islamic brands and proposes a wider range of determinants in the framework. The study’s sample size was 378, and the respondents were Muslim consumers in Malaysia and Pakistan. Purposive sampling technique was used to extract the sample from three cities in each country. Partial least square (PLS) was used to statistically analyze the data using PLS–structural equation modeling approach. The measurement model was analyzed, and invariance of the measurement model was established. Afterward, the hypotheses were tested, and multi-group analysis was performed through Henseler’s multi-group analysis (MGA) and Permutation test.

Findings

The results indicate a lack of significant relationships between the independent variables and the purchase intention of Halal vaccination except in the case of subjective norms. This construct has a significant but inverse relationship in the case of Pakistan’s Muslim consumers, which can be attributed to the presence of consumer skepticism regarding the issue of Halal vaccination. The MGA results reveal a statistically significant difference in the influence of religiosity on purchase intention between the two countries, depicting differences in the brand–self congruity perceptions of consumers in the two countries.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was relatively small due to the limited time duration.

Originality/value

The area of Halal vaccination has been given limited attention in academic literature. This study addresses this area that has limited research and is greatly attractive to a large number of brands targeting the Muslim consumer market. The results of the study can form a foundation for creating the branding strategy of this product category and assessing its demand in various Muslim markets.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2022

Sadia Aziz, Muhammad Abdullah Khan Niazi and Usman Ghani

This study aims to empirically examine the knowledge, social and religious factors effecting the intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination while considering the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine the knowledge, social and religious factors effecting the intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination while considering the mediating role of attitude towards COVID-19 vaccination. The research explores how the Islamic ideologies shape Muslims’ knowledge, social and religious beliefs towards COVID-19 vaccination acceptance or refusal.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretically, the study is based on the functional theory of attitudes. The model of the study is comprised of nine variables explaining the attitude and intention towards COVID-19 vaccination. Among nine variables, perceived Islamic religiosity, perceived behavioural control and Halal consciousness among Muslims are explained through the value-expressive function of attitude. Furthermore, the perceived risk of COVID-19, the perceived side effect of COVID-19 vaccination and the perceived efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination are considered in the model based on the utility function of attitude. Moreover, social influence for COVID vaccination, subjective norms and group conformity are abstracted from the social-adjustive function of attitude. This study used a quantitative survey research method to test the hypotheses. A total of 1,000 questionnaires were distributed to non-vaccinated Muslim respondents from five cities in Pakistan. The structural equation modelling (SEM) technique was used to test the relationship among the variables in the proposed model. The partial least square-SEM method explained the variances in the dependent variables. Moreover, to test the structure of data, different statistical tests, including exploratory factor analysis (EFA), factor loadings and average variance extracted, were used with the help of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and analysis of a moment structures (AMOS) 23.0 version.

Findings

Results for direct effect showed a significant negative effect of Islamic religiosity, perceived behavioural control, halal consciousness, perceived side effect of COVID-19 vaccination, social influence, subjective norm and group conformity on attitude towards COVID-19 vaccination. In contrast, insignificant results showed no relationship of perceived risk from COVID-19 infection and perceived efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination with attitude towards COVID-19 vaccination. Results for mediating effect showed the significant negative mediating effect of attitude towards COVID-19 vaccination between Islamic religiosity, perceived behavioural control, halal consciousness, perceived side effect, social influence, subjective norm, group conformity and intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination. While results showed the insignificant mediation of attitude towards COVID-19 between perceived risk from COVID-19 infection, perceived efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination and intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies are required to compare the attitude and intention among the temporary refusal group (those who will consider vaccination the future) and the permanent refusal group (those who will not consider vaccination the future). Comparing Muslim and non-Muslim groups can also explain differences in attitude and intention towards COVID-19 vaccination.

Originality/value

The area of acceptance and refusal of COVID-19 vaccination has been given limited attention in academic literature. Theoretically, this research has proposed a well-defined model to explain the attitude of Muslims towards COVID-19 vaccination. This model can helpf predict the attitude and intentions of Muslims towards vaccination or medicines. Moreover, this research is a unique contribution for the vaccination brands to consider the discussed factors before launching their brand in Muslim countries.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Xuan Cu Le and Thi Thuy Linh Vu

Vaccination is widely conceded as a pivotal measure to achieve community immunization and eradicate COVID-19. The purpose of this paper is to understand vaccination

Abstract

Purpose

Vaccination is widely conceded as a pivotal measure to achieve community immunization and eradicate COVID-19. The purpose of this paper is to understand vaccination behavior based on the association between the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and health belief model (HBM).

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was designed to collect data from 438 participants through social media in Vietnam and later analyzed using SPSS and AMOS to examine the research model.

Findings

The results indicated that attitude toward vaccination is positively influenced by perceived risk and perceived benefits. Additionally, background constructs of TPB (i.e. social norms, attitude and perceived behavioral control) and HBM (i.e. perceived risk, response efficacy, perceived benefits and knowledge about COVID-19) are underlying motivations for individual intention to receive vaccine. Moreover, age is a demographic predictor of vaccination intention. Finally, vaccination intention facilitates COVID-19 vaccination.

Practical implications

The findings will assist health-care bodies and authorities to understand public perceptions, attitude and behaviors and encourage their participation in vaccination campaigns.

Originality/value

To date, this is the first investigation of how disease knowledge and perceived benefits drive vaccination intention in Vietnam. Moreover, this study may be initially successful in adding current health-care behavior literature by combining TPB with HBM. With most studies on vaccination intention at the early stage of COVID-19 outbreak in developed nations, this work provides new insights by testing vaccination behavior in the fourth wave of COVID-19 outbreak and in a developing nation.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2022

Muhammad Sholihin, Nurus Shalihin, Mega Ilhamiwati and Hendrianto Hendrianto

This study aims to gain new insight into how a set of maqasid-based consumption intelligence variables mediates exogenous variables (i.e. religiosity, Islamic university…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to gain new insight into how a set of maqasid-based consumption intelligence variables mediates exogenous variables (i.e. religiosity, Islamic university role and normative belief) and halal purchase intention as an endogenous variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model is empirically tested with a data set of 370 responses retrieved from the students of the millennial generation from the cross Islamic state university in Indonesia. Data were analysed with Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM). The sample size of this study is computed with preliminary power analysis.

Findings

The SEM finding revealed that two maqasid-based consumption intelligence variables had mediated the exogenous and endogenous variables, i.e. halal purchase intention. These variables mediating the exogenous and endogenous variables have explained 63.5 R2 variances in halal purchase intention. Concerning individual impact size of cognition and motivation as a component of maqasid-based consumption intelligence has shown medium-level effect size (f2) in mediating the halal purchase intention. Interestingly, the exogenous variable does not directly affect halal purchase intention but must be mediated with maqasid-based consumption intelligence variables. However, before including variables of maqasid-based consumption intelligence, the R2 was relatively small. It is just 30.4% in R2 that explains the variance of halal purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores maqasid-based consumption intelligence as a relatively new model to explain the variable halal purchase intention. Therefore, it takes many types of exogenous variables to test how relevant maqasid-based consumption intelligence variables can define endogenous variables. Notwithstanding, this study does not do that because it only limits three exogenous variables (i.e. religiosity, Islamic university role and normative belief). Therefore, in further research, these limitations seem to be perfected by other scholars concerned about halal purchase intention.

Practical implications

The findings of this study allow Islamic universities to mainstream halal issues as a subject of learning, especially concerning consumption ethics. In addition, the empirical results of this study encourage the industry to pay attention to the essential components in determining the halal quality of the products offered because the millennial generation is now very aware of the importance of halal products.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature on halal purchase intention by testing maqasid-based consumption intelligence variables as mediators. Moreover, this is a pioneer study to consider and construct maqasid-based consumption intelligence as a model that explains halal purchase intention.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Noor Hazilah Abd Manaf, Mohd Azahadi Omar and Fatin Husna Suib

The World Health Organization identified vaccine hesitancy as one of the ten threats to global health in 2019. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implications…

Abstract

Purpose

The World Health Organization identified vaccine hesitancy as one of the ten threats to global health in 2019. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implications and factors affecting parental decision on childhood immunisation in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews literature on vaccine hesitancy and evaluation of factors affecting parental decision on childhood immunisation in Malaysia.

Findings

Vaccine hesitancy is a growing public health concern in Malaysia with factors such as influence of Internet and social media, personal choice and individual right, conspiracy theory, religious reasons and alternative medicine as among the influencing dynamics. An urban, educated demography operating within a postmodern medical paradigm compounds the diminishing value of vaccines.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive examination of vaccine hesitancy in Malaysia. Critical appraisal on personal choice over societal responsibility within an Asian/Muslim collectivist society has not been discussed in previous studies. The acceptance of homeopathy as an Islamic medicine alternative is peculiar to multi-ethnic, multi-cultural Malaysia.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2022

Dwi Agustina Kurniawati, Asfin Handoko, Rajesh Piplani and Rianna Rosdiahti

This paper aims to optimize the halal product distribution by minimizing the transportation cost while ensuring halal integrity of the product. The problem is considered…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to optimize the halal product distribution by minimizing the transportation cost while ensuring halal integrity of the product. The problem is considered as a capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP), based on the assumption that two different types of vehicles are used for distribution: vehicles dedicated for halal product distribution and vehicles dedicated for nonhalal products distribution. The problem is modeled as an integer linear program (ILP), termed CVRP-halal and nonhalal products distribution (CVRP-HNPD). It is solved using tabu-search (TS)-based algorithm and is suitable for application to real-life sized halal product distribution.

Design/methodology/approach

Two approaches are used in solving the problem: exact approach (integer-linear program) and approximate approach (TS). First, the problem is modeled as ILP and solved using CPLEX Solver. To solve life-sized problems, a TS-based algorithm is developed and run using MATLAB.

Findings

The experiments on numerical data and life-sized instances validate the proposed model and algorithm and show that cost-minimizing routes for HNPD are developed while ensuring the halal integrity of the products.

Practical implications

The proposed model and algorithm are suitable as decision support tools for managers responsible for distribution of halal products as they facilitate the development of minimum cost distribution routes for halal and nonhalal products while maintaining the integrity of halal products. The model and algorithm provide a low transportation cost strategy at the operational level of halal products distribution while fulfilling the halal logistics requirement.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study that specifically deals with the CVRP of halal products distribution by proposing CVRP-HNPD model and TS-CVRP-HNPD algorithm. The proposed model and algorithm ensure the integrity of halal products along the distribution chain, from the warehouse (distribution center) to the retailer, while achieving lowest transportation cost.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Sefriani Sefriani and Nur Gemilang Mahardhika

The Covid-19 pandemic has persisted for almost three years. States have since then enforced laws, policies and measures believed to be the most effective to handle the…

Abstract

Purpose

The Covid-19 pandemic has persisted for almost three years. States have since then enforced laws, policies and measures believed to be the most effective to handle the global pandemic. Along this line, the Indonesian Government opted to implement mandatory vaccination and refusal of which entails monetary penalties. Hence, this study aims to analyze two legal issues that touch upon the realm of International Human Rights Law: first, whether state has the authority to implement the said mandatory vaccine program to those who refuse to be vaccinated, and second, how is the more appropriate legal policy to obligate vaccination but without coercive sanction.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a normative legal research that uses a qualitative method with case studies, conceptual, historical and comparative approaches. A descriptive-analytical deduction process was used in analyzing the issue.

Findings

The results present, as part of state’s right to regulate, it has the authority to enact mandatory vaccination with monetary penalties to fulfil its obligation to protect public health in times of emergency; this is legal and constitutional but only if it satisfies the requirements under the International Human Rights Law: public health necessity, reasonableness, proportionality and harm avoidance. Alternatively, herd immunity is achievable without deploying unnecessary coercive sanctions, such as improving public channels of communication and information, adopting legal policies that incentivize people’s compliance like exclusion from public services, subsidies revocation, employment restrictions, higher health insurance premiums, etc.

Research limitations/implications

This study analyzes in depth the following issues: of whether the government has the authority to apply mandatory vaccination laws enforced through monetary penalties for those who refused to be vaccinated and how does the government implement the appropriate legal policy to enforce mandatory vaccination without imposing penalties for non-compliance while maintaining a balance between the interests of protecting public health and the human rights of individuals to choose medical treatment for themselves, including whether they are willing to be vaccinated. Hence, the political affairs, economic matters and other non-legal related issues are excluded from this study.

Originality/value

This paper hence offers a suggestive insight for state in formulating a policy relating to the mandatory vaccination program. Although the monetary penalties do not directly violate the rule of law, a more non-coercive approach to the society would be more favorable.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

102

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Suhana Mohezar, Sedigheh Moghavvemi and Suhaiza Zailani

This paper aims to examine challenges and prospects of the Malaysian Islamic medical tourism sector and suggests strategies to leverage the strengths and opportunities as…

1925

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine challenges and prospects of the Malaysian Islamic medical tourism sector and suggests strategies to leverage the strengths and opportunities as well as overcome the weaknesses and threats.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with the Islamic hospital managers. Information collected was transcribed and content analysis was used to group the variables into the four SWOT categories.

Findings

The SWOT analysis identified several strengths (e.g. great hospitality, country’s characteristics and development of Islamic compliant hospital), weaknesses (e.g. low international certifications), opportunities (e.g. growing Muslim populations, Sept 11 incidence) and threats (e.g. competition from major medical tourism market and non-uniformity of Islamic medical tourism standards).

Research limitations/implications

This paper could provide understanding of the sector and fundamental on the Islamic medical tourism market. Yet the SWOT analysis does not indicate how to achieve competitive advantage and result may become obsolete, with the dynamic environments.

Practical implications

This paper could serve as a guideline for the industry stakeholders to have better understanding in their business environment.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind to integrate SWOT analysis and Islamic medical tourism industry. Hence, the findings could broaden knowledge on Islamic medical tourism industry and facilitate firms in tapping the growing market.

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2022

Fiona Ellen MacVane Phipps

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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