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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2018

Afzaal Ali, Guo Xiaoling, Mehkar Sherwani and Adnan Ali

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of traditional branding constructs – brand image, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty to an unexplored…

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3936

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of traditional branding constructs – brand image, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty to an unexplored field of Halal products – Halal brand image, Halal brand satisfaction, Halal brand trust and Halal brand loyalty. In addition, this study seeks to elaborate the relationships among brand perceived quality, Halal brand image, Halal brand satisfaction, and Halal brand trust, Halal brand loyalty and consumer purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model with hypothesised relationships is developed and tested with the help of structural equation modelling procedure in AMOS. This research used the questionnaire survey method to collect data from 347 consumers in Pakistan who had the experience of purchasing Halal milk brand.

Findings

The empirical results suggest that perceived brand quality has a significant and positive influence on the Halal brand image, Halal brand satisfaction, Halal brand trust, Halal brand loyalty and purchase intention. Similarly, the Halal brand image, Halal brand satisfaction, Halal brand trust and Halal brand loyalty significantly influence consumer Halal brand purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The Muslim population is growing in many parts of the world, including non-Muslim countries. Although this study’s focus is limited to Pakistani Muslims, findings related to the effects of brand perceived quality, Halal brand image, Halal brand satisfaction, and Halal brand trust and Halal brand loyalty on intentions may not be equally valid for Muslim consumers in others Muslim and non-Muslim countries and for other types of products.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that ignoring the important quality elements of a brand could be costly to marketers who failed to realise the importance of traditional brand attributes whilst embracing Halal brand marketing initiatives. In addition, Halal branding can allow the businesses to access to new markets, to enjoy more competitive advantages and to increase their profitability by selling at higher prices with higher profit margins.

Originality/value

Although previous research has explored the relevant issues about brand image, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty, none highlights these traditional constructs to an unexplored field of Halal products.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Dwi Suhartanto, Marwansyah Marwansyah, Muhammad Muflih, Moh Farid Najib and Irgiana Faturohman

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the Quality–Loyalty Model and the Religiosity–Loyalty Model to assess loyalty formation toward Halal food.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the Quality–Loyalty Model and the Religiosity–Loyalty Model to assess loyalty formation toward Halal food.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 320 respondents were collected in Bandung Indonesia through a survey. A partial least-square modeling was employed to evaluate the association between food quality, religiosity, perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty.

Findings

This study discloses that the two integrated loyalty models are fit, indicating that incorporating these loyalty models provides a better comprehension of loyalty toward Halal food. Further, this study confirms the importance of both food quality and religiosity in determining loyalty.

Practical implications

This research offers an important finding for Halal food managers to develop customer loyalty through food quality and religiosity. This research recommends that Halal food managers, besides obtaining Halal certification, need to constantly innovate and adopt world food-quality standards to deal with customers’ constantly changing demands.

Originality/value

This research is the first that integrates the Quality–Loyalty Model and the Religiosity–Loyalty Model to get a better understanding of loyalty formation toward Halal food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Suhaiza Zailani, Shima Jafarzadeh, Mohammad Iranmanesh, Davoud Nikbin and Nur Izatul Irani Selim

The purpose of this paper is to devise and test a model of halal logistic service quality.

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1529

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to devise and test a model of halal logistic service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop the halal logistics service quality model, the relevant literature was reviewed and a qualitative study was carried out on halal logistics service providers and their customers. A survey of 253 halal food and beverage firms in Malaysia was conducted, and based on the results, a model was developed and tested empirically.

Findings

Based on the literature review, interviews, pretest and empirical study, a valid and reliable measurement instrument for halal logistics service quality was developed.

Practical implications

The findings can help managers of halal logistics service providers to understand the criteria that halal food and beverage firms are considered to judge the quality of halal logistics services.

Originality/value

This study makes a valuable contribution by proposing a halal logistics service quality model.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Carrie Amani Annabi and Olufunbi Olajumoke Ibidapo-Obe

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that halal certification organisations (HCOs) play in the UK in assuring quality in halal cosmetics.

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2333

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that halal certification organisations (HCOs) play in the UK in assuring quality in halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study evaluates whether halal certification assures the quality of halal cosmetic products. This research evaluated the quality assurance systems of major UK HCOs, using a hypothetical product as a test vehicle. The investigation considered whether these organisations differ in their definition of “halal” and “halal cosmetics” and also considered how effectively their certification signals quality assurance.

Findings

The study indicated that there is a failure to adopt holistic halal terminology which implies that within the UK halal cosmetics industry, manufacturers may not be working within agreed standards for halal product integrity.

Research limitations/implications

This study focussed on UK certification for halal cosmetics by three HCOs and disregarded other forms of halal businesses. The literature review is based solely on literature available in the English language. The study lacks generalisability, as only one hypothetical product was tested; therefore, it was not possible to reach an understanding of all the costs involved in UK HCO certification.

Practical implications

This study undertook a comprehensive literature review on halal certification to produce a comparison of halal sanctioning laws, certification processes and the level of supply chain verification by UK HCOs.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the knowledge on UK halal certification.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

Javeed Anam, Bin Mohamed Mokhtar Sany Sanuri and Bin Lebai Othman Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the impact of halal logo as an extrinsic food packaging cue on perceived food quality moderated by the role of consumer knowledge.

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1282

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the impact of halal logo as an extrinsic food packaging cue on perceived food quality moderated by the role of consumer knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

An exhaustive literature review has been undertaken for the conceptual development. The nexus between halal logo and perceived food quality has been developed which provides a foundation for the further research.

Findings

The findings of this paper indicate that the halal-labelled products create a psychological impact about the quality of the food product.

Practical implications

This paper presents a brief overview of the lucrative opportunities in halal business for Pakistan. The findings of this paper can be adopted by the marketers for the development of proper marketing strategies. The empirical investigations of this paper could offer the base to the marketers to invest in favorable product packaging cues. The role halal logo as a food quality indicator has previously been overlooked in the literature. The impact of halal logo on food quality perception is emergent with avenues for study across various cultures and religions.

Originality/value

This is a useful paper which proposes a useful testable model for study in Pakistani consumer market to fill the gaps of Islamic consumer behavior literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Baharudin Othman, Sharifudin Md Shaarani and Arsiah Bahron

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of knowledge, halal dietary quality assurance practices, and commitment among food industries in the implementation of…

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3707

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of knowledge, halal dietary quality assurance practices, and commitment among food industries in the implementation of halal in Malaysia. Besides, the study was based on two categories that are considered major contributors in the chain of halal food sector in Malaysia which are the multinational, and small medium enterprise (SME).

Design/methodology/approach

Two company’s categories related to halal food and beverage industry which are the multinational, and SME were chosen in this research based on the similarities in terms of functions and needs in the implementation of halal in Malaysia. Furthermore, both categories are the main groups in the halal food sector that support the growth of other categories. The sample of the study was comprised of 241 companies from halal certification holders (MNCs=69; SMEs=172).Cross-sectional study through random sampling and purposive sampling was used where the internal halal committee who have been specifically appointed in the organization were asked to fill in the questionnaire. Personally hand-delivered questionnaires in workplaces was used as a method of data collection. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 21.

Findings

Based on the analysis, it was found that the level of knowledge, halal quality assurance practices and commitment to be at a good level. Whereas the results of inference showed that there are significant differences for the three variables studied.

Research limitations/implications

In the study there are some limitations, namely; first, the categories studied are focussed solely on halal food industry. Halal now been expanded to other products such as pharmaceutical, logistics, etc. Second, the standards used are the standard and guidelines on the handling of food. Finally, the limitations in obtaining more respondents as most industry in Malaysia is still concerned to provide feedback and view it as the secrecy of the company.

Practical implications

First, the implication of the theory and literature studies in which the research prevalence is associated with the ISO quality and quality management, integration of multiple disciplines and concepts is essential as a combination of elements of human capital and strategic management. Second, on behalf of the government or specially-appointed halal certification body, it can give a clear picture of the exposure and promotion related to the deed, procedures, and guidelines have gone through several changes and amendments. In addition, it is also able to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of conditions that are required such as internal halal appointment committee. Third for industry practitioners, focussing in delivering halal standards is not dependent on the system, working patterns, and technologies alone, but should also take into account the element of human capital and organizational responsibility in maintaining halal integrity and enhancing the knowledge and halal dietary management in accordance with the requirements of Islamic law and fatwa.

Social implications

On behalf of the users, the confidence is there and in order to produce a halal product, it involves a fairly strict chain and has always been regulated by a special committee whose role are meeting the needs outlined halal standards.

Originality/value

The study is the starting point in discussing in detail about the halal knowledge, halal quality assurance, and commitment after the standardization and harmonization of halal certification in early 2012. Furthermore, there are a few revisions on the act, standards, and procedures by the halal certification body, which halal assurance should be implemented and considered still new.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Mohd Helmi Ali, Mohammad Iranmanesh, Kim Hua Tan, Suhaiza Zailani and Nor Asiah Omar

The current complex halal food supply chain (SC) has caused food scandals, which have illustrated the weakness of multiple food quality standards and certification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The current complex halal food supply chain (SC) has caused food scandals, which have illustrated the weakness of multiple food quality standards and certification and audits in ensuring food safety. Drawn on the resource-based view (RBV) theory, the purpose of this study is to explore the impacts of SC integration (SCI) on halal food SC integrity and, consequently, food quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected from 275 halal-certified food companies in Malaysia and analysed using structural equation modelling – SmartPLS3.0.

Findings

The results confirmed that SCI, including internal, supplier and customer integrations, has significant effects on the dimensions of the halal food SC integrity which, in turn, lead to halal food safety and quality.

Practical implications

The importance of SCI in halal food SC is highlighted in this study. The impact of SCI is contexted in halal food SC integrity and food quality. Therefore, it provides a clear understanding to managers of SC applicability in the halal food industry.

Originality/value

Based on the RBV theory, this study contributes to the limited body of research of the relationships among SCI from the context of the halal industry with a specific focus on food supply chain integrity and food quality.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2020

Afzaal Ali, Mehkar Sherwani, Adnan Ali, Zeeshan Ali and Mariam Sherwani

This paper aims to apply the concept of traditional branding constructs, i.e. brand image, brand perceived quality, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty to a…

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1166

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply the concept of traditional branding constructs, i.e. brand image, brand perceived quality, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty to a less explored field of halal brand products – halal brand image, halal brand perceived quality, halal brand satisfaction, halal brand trust and halal brand loyalty. Second, the present research is an effort to empirically validate the interrelationships among branding constructs such as brand image, brand perceived quality, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty in a holistic framework to confirm whether these branding constructs also work for the halal brand in the same way to gauge Chinese Muslims consumers’ purchasing intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used cross-sectional data from 481 Chinese Muslim students at 9 universities located in 3 cities of China through face-to-face and online survey methods. Data were collected from the consumers of halal milk brand. A theoretical model with the hypothesized relationships was tested with the help of the structural equation modelling procedure.

Findings

The results suggest that halal brand image has a significant and positive influence on the halal brand perceived quality, halal brand satisfaction, halal brand trust and halal brand loyalty. Similarly, the halal brand perceived quality, halal brand satisfaction, halal brand trust and halal brand loyalty significantly influence consumer halal brand purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted in the halal food sector of China and specific religious and migration contexts. Further investigations of the halal food purchasing behaviour of local Muslims, as well as international Muslim students in those Western countries which are famous destinations for international students for education, could yield varying results.

Practical implications

The outcomes achieved are helpful for commerce and government organizations for policy development to better meet the burgeoning demand for halal products by Chinese Muslims. These are also very helpful for producers and exporters who intend to penetrate the halal market in non-Muslim-dominant countries such as China.

Originality/value

Studies on understanding Muslim consumers’ purchasing behaviours in non-Muslim countries are limited. Given the fact, numbers of Muslims seem a smaller amount of China’s total population, but their total numbers are large compared with total numbers in many Muslim countries. Therefore, understanding their purchasing behaviours for halal products and influential determinants concerning such purchasing behaviours adds to the literature and helps the industry to better serve and capitalise on the growing market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Dwi Suhartanto, David Dean, Ira Siti Sarah, Raditha Hapsari, Fatya Alty Amalia and Tintin Suhaeni

This paper aims to assess customer loyalty towards halal cosmetics using three integrated loyalty routes of product quality, emotional attachment and religious determinants.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess customer loyalty towards halal cosmetics using three integrated loyalty routes of product quality, emotional attachment and religious determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were gathered from 457 s cosmetics customers. Variance-based structural equation modelling was applied to assess the association between product quality, emotional attachment, religiosity, customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.

Findings

This study reveals that for halal cosmetics, customer loyalty is driven more by emotional attachment and product quality than by religiosity. Further, the religiosity does not moderate the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. Finally, this study reveals that the impact of emotional attachment and product quality on customer loyalty is partly through strengthening customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study provides an opportunity for halal cosmetics managers to increase customer loyalty through the development of emotional attachment and product quality. To develop customer loyalty towards their halal cosmetic products, this study suggests that halal cosmetics managers should offer high-quality products and continuously innovate their cosmetic products.

Originality/value

This is an early empirical study attempting to examine the link between religiosity and customer loyalty in halal cosmetic products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Haruna Babatunde Jaiyeoba, Moha Asri Abdullah and Abdul Razak Dzuljastri

This paper aims to ascertain whether halal certification mark, halal brand quality and halal awareness influence Nigerian consumers when making buying decisions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to ascertain whether halal certification mark, halal brand quality and halal awareness influence Nigerian consumers when making buying decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers reflect on the newly collected data to shed light on the above issues from the perspective of Nigerian consumers. To this end, a questionnaire was developed and used to collect data from 282 respondents. The data collected were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

This study found that halal certification mark and halal brand quality are the most influential factors that contributed to the consumers’ buying decisions in Nigeria.

Originality/value

Based on the findings of this study, the researchers have argued that more efforts are needed in the area of halal awareness in Nigeria. Similarly, the study argues that halal brand quality should always be held at the esteemed position. Based on the study’s findings, the authors have been able to fill the literature gap, particularly in the context of the Nigerian halal industry.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000