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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Nur Izatul Irani Binti Selim, Suhaiza Zailani, Azmin Azliza Aziz and Muhammad Khalilur Rahman

This study aims to empirically examine a model of the halal logistic services, its impact on manufacturers’ trust and satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine a model of the halal logistic services, its impact on manufacturers’ trust and satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted through survey questionnaires after an extensive review of the literature. A total of 564 samples of the questionnaire were distributed to logistics management representatives of halal manufacturing companies in Malaysia. This survey was carried out to measure the respondents’ perception of halal manufacturers’ satisfaction with third-party logistic (3PL) service providers in Malaysia. The instruments/survey incorporate halal assurance services, halal service diversity and halal service procedure as the antecedents of halal manufacturers’ trust and satisfaction.

Findings

The findings indicate that halal assurance services and halal service procedure are positively associated with manufacturers’ trust and satisfaction, while halal service diversity is not associated with it. The study also shows that manufacturers’ attitude play a mediator role between the halal logistic service and manufacturers’ satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study provides useful information in understanding the importance of halal logistic services and more particularly aims at facilitating 3PL service providers to offer halal logistic services quality that suits the manufacturers’ needs.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, Yuserrie Zainuddin and Ramayah Thurasamy

This study aims to identify the contributing factors to the adoption of Halal warehousing services among Malaysia Halal manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the contributing factors to the adoption of Halal warehousing services among Malaysia Halal manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey, based on the technology, organization and environment (TOE) framework, was distributed to 200 participants at the Malaysia International Halal Showcase 2013. Of these, 140 responses were complete, and the data were analyzed using structural equation modelling approach and SMART-PLS 2.0 software.

Findings

Perceived benefits, cost, customer pressure and organizational readiness were found to have a significant relationship with Halal manufacturers’ intention to adopt Halal warehousing services. Perceived benefits, customer pressure and organizational readiness were the drivers of adoption, and cost was a barrier.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines the factors affecting Malaysian Halal manufacturers’ intention to adopt Halal warehousing services in three industries, food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.

Practical implications

The results provide insights into the adoption of Halal warehousing among Malaysian Halal manufacturers. The government, Halal warehouse service providers and customers may use these findings to expand the adoption of Halal warehouse services.

Originality/value

Adopting the TOE framework, this study investigates and develops a model for Halal warehouse adoption. The results indicate that the variables from the TOE framework have a significant relationship with the adoption of Halal warehousing activities.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, T. Ramayah, Mohd Helmi Ali and Mohd Imran Khan

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

Base on the technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework, applying the purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to the participants of Malaysia International Halal Showcase (MIHAS) and Halal festival (Halfest). Out of 110 questionnaires distributed, only 97 data from 102 respondents could be used for further analysis. SMART-PLS 3.2.7 was used to analyze the data for this study using a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Perceived benefits, competitive pressure (COMP) and customer pressure were found to have a significant relationship with the intention to adopt Halal warehousing services, the organizational readiness was found to be a not significant factor in the adoption of Halal transportation. Top management attitudes (TMAs) moderate the positive relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the Halal manufacturers in the pharmaceuticals and cosmetics industry who attended MIHAS and Halfest, which still not adopting Halal transportation activities.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful information to a better understanding of the factors influencing the adoption of Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Related parties such as the government, the Halal transport service providers and the customers could use these findings to plan further action to enhance the adoption of Halal transport adoption.

Originality/value

The study revealed the capability of the TOE framework to identify the factors influencing the decision to adopt Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. TMA was found to have a moderation effect on the relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Jun-Jie Hew, Lai-Wan Wong, Garry Wei-Han Tan, Keng-Boon Ooi and Binshan Lin

Given the emerging nature of integrating blockchain into food traceability systems, this study aims to investigate the intention to participate in a blockchain-based Halal

Abstract

Purpose

Given the emerging nature of integrating blockchain into food traceability systems, this study aims to investigate the intention to participate in a blockchain-based Halal traceability system through a united model that consists of Halal orientation strategy, institutional theory and diffusion of innovation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample that consists of 143 Malaysian Halal food and beverage manufacturers was drawn from Halal Malaysia Official Portal using the simple random sampling technique. The responses were collected from the key managerial personnel with experience and knowledge on the Halal supply chain using phone interviews. Subsequently, the partial least squares structural equation modelling approach was then used to analyse the theoretical model.

Findings

The manufacturers would go through a chain of the process before deciding to participate in the traceability system. Firstly, the manufacturers which practice a comprehensive Halal orientation strategy will be more perceptive towards the institutional pressures that demand them to participate in a traceability system. Secondly, in response to the pressures, the manufacturers would evaluate the technological characteristics of the system and subsequently develop their perceived desirability. Thirdly, the manufacturers with favourable perceived desirability shall decide to participate in the system.

Originality/value

This study advances the current literature of Halal supply chain, information systems, operations management and blockchain through an integrated model that could explain 73.19% of the variance in intention to participate.

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Afshan Azam

This study aims to investigate the determinant factors that consumers may consider in buying halal packaged food produced by non-Muslim manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the determinant factors that consumers may consider in buying halal packaged food produced by non-Muslim manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a seven-constructs-based model. Halal awareness, Islamic brand and product ingredients are used as the pre-determined factors for measuring consumer’s purchase intention.

Findings

The hypotheses which were tested using partial least squares have revealed that halal awareness and product ingredients have significantly influenced Muslims’ intention to buy halal packaged food that are produced by non-Muslim manufacturers. The findings show that the religious belief, exposure and certification/logo are potential sources of Muslim awareness about halal packaged food from non-Muslim manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

This research is also not exempted from its limitations. The data collected for the current study investigate general purchase toward halal products. It would be interesting if future researchers examine consumers’ purchase intention toward specific halal products for specific product categories. A comparative study is also worthy of being steered, as such a study is beneficial for producers and marketers of the halal industry.

Practical implications

As an overall implication, this study will provide a valuable and important information for non-Muslim halal packaged food manufacturers in identifying the appropriate strategy to fulfill the needs and wants of Muslim consumers at best. It is sufficed to suggest that the Muslim community has adopted halal food from non-Islamic brands as part of their lifestyle choice. Clearly, this gives implications to non-Muslim halal food producers. Thus, it is critical for food manufacturers to increase the level of awareness toward halal products by providing sufficient and interesting information, especially on halal certification. Hence, the manufacturer must take the opportunity to do intensive promotion to encourage more consumers to purchase their products.

Originality/value

This paper examines consumer purchase intention toward non-Muslim packed food manufactures in Saudi Arabia. It is critical for non-Muslim packed halal food manufacturers to increase the level of awareness toward halal products by providing sufficient and interesting information, especially on halal certification.

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, Yuserrie Zainuddin and Ramayah Thurasamy

This paper aims to identify the determinants of the adoption factors of Halal warehousing activities among Halal manufacturers in Malaysia. It is hoped that this work…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the determinants of the adoption factors of Halal warehousing activities among Halal manufacturers in Malaysia. It is hoped that this work would contribute to the growth of research in the area of Halal adoption services.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this quantitative study were gathered from 140 participants of the Malaysia International Halal Showcase 2013. Smart PLS version 2.0 was used to analyze the relationship of each construct using the structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Awareness, complexity and top management support were found to be the determinant factors in the Halal warehousing services adoption among Malaysian Halal manufacturers. Supplier availability was found to have a negative relationship in the adoption of Halal warehousing services.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study revealed some important implications and great values among researchers, Halal service providers and the government sector. It is also hoped that the findings of this study would give some insights into the adoption of Halal warehouse services. However, many other variables such as perceived benefits, consumer pressure and, also, industry pressure which may also contribute to a better understanding of Halal services should also be considered.

Practical implications

The Halal service providers should focus their offer of services not only to areas around Kuala Lumpur and Selangor but also to other areas in Malaysia. There is a great demand for their services throughout the whole nation, as the Halal manufacturers are scattered all over East and West Malaysia.

Originality/value

This study is an attempt to investigate and develop the Halal warehousing adoption model that was theoretically grounded in the technology, organization and environment (TOE) framework. This study found that the TOE framework could explain better each variable which has a relationship with the adoption of Halal warehousing activities.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, Ramayah Thurasamy, Nurul Haqimin Mohd Salleh, Jagan Jeevan, Rudiah Md Hanafiah and Bilal Eneizan

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the intention to adopt Halal transportation among Halal food manufacturers in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the intention to adopt Halal transportation among Halal food manufacturers in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to Halal food manufacturers who participated in Halal showcase and festival in Malaysia. Out of 317 companies who were approached, 290 respondents agreed to answer the questionnaire and only 247 can be used for data analysis. SMART-partial least squares (PLS) 3.2.9. was used to analyze the data for this study using a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Cost, perceived benefits and customer pressure were found to have a positive relationship with the intention to adopt Halal transportation, meanwhile, organizational readiness was found as insignificant. Top management attitude moderates the relationship between perceived benefits and the intention to adopt Halal transportation. However, it fails to moderate the relationship between organizational readiness and intention to adopt.

Research limitations/implications

The study only focuses on the Halal food manufacturers who attended Malaysian International Halal showcase and Halal festival, which is still not applying Halal transportation in their business activities.

Practical implications

The findings unearth meaningful information for the many parties involve to enhance the adoption rate of Halal transportation not only for Malaysia but also for countries which has similar characteristics to Malaysia. Government bodies and Halal logistics providers could use the findings of the study to formula a new approach in their capacity to transform from intention to be a real user of Halal transportation services. Even the study only focuses on Halal transportation, it also may reflect other Halal services.

Originality/value

The study reveals the capability of the technology, organization and environment framework to identify the factors of intention to adopt Halal transportation among Halal food manufacturers in Malaysia. The findings also show the moderation effects of top management attitude on the perceived benefits. Besides that, the study enriches the literature on Halal studies especially related to the Halal supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Fadhlur Rahim Azmi, Abu Abdullah, Haslinda Musa and Wan Hasrulnizzam Wan Mahmood

Food industry players obtain the advantages of profits growth within the halal industry whereby the market is dynamic to generate profit. Hence, this study aims to analyse…

Abstract

Purpose

Food industry players obtain the advantages of profits growth within the halal industry whereby the market is dynamic to generate profit. Hence, this study aims to analyse the perception of food manufacturers towards the adoption of the halal food supply chain (HFSC).

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, 103 halal food manufacturers in Malaysia were selected as respondents. Perceptions of respondents towards HFSC were recorded using a five-point questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed by authors and adapted from a previous study. The questionnaire was circulated by two experts with proficiency in this filed.

Findings

By conducting exploratory factor analysis, the study found the perception of food manufacturers, which is expected business benefits play an important role in the adoption of HFSC. Halal integrity becomes the second factor to lead the company to its adoption. Organizational readiness is the third factor that drives the company to adopt HFSC.

Research limitations/implications

Majority of the sample was responded by Bumiputera companies. The study suggests focussing the study for non-Bumiputera companies to examine their influence towards HFSC. Furthermore, future studies should explore different sectors of halal, such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, travel and tourism, logistics, finance and e-commerce. Moreover, ensuring the status of halal should be more emphasized in food chains; thus, the source of risk in HFSC should be explored to secure the integrity of halal.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the halal food industry, whereby the adoption of HFSC will contribute to the business benefits to create a more competitive advantage to the industry. Moreover, the implications of halal practice can create consumers’ trust on the halal product.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an analysed need to study specifically on upstream parties by adopting HFSC.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Suraiya Ishak, Abd Hair Awang, Mohd Yusof Hussain, Zaimah Ramli, Sarmila Md Sum, Suhana Saad and Azima Abd Manaf

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential determinants of halal perception and to validate the mediating model of halal perception on purchasing decision of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential determinants of halal perception and to validate the mediating model of halal perception on purchasing decision of Malaysian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey to obtain the relevant data. The survey involved self-administration of questionnaires to 420 consumers and 96 per cent responded. The questionnaire consists of four sections designed to obtain information on demography, halal perception, determinants of halal perception and purchase decision.

Findings

The main finding reiterates the role of credible signals in credence items purchased as suggested by the signaling theory. Halal perception has association with respondents’ purchase decision. Thus, it highlights that halal perception is the mediating variable that intervenes in the relationship of a few independent variables and the purchase decision trends. The independent variables such as manufacturer identity, product label, physical product and packaging as well country of origin are considered to be important extrinsic cues that deliver messages regarding the halal of certain food products. The association of the four variables with halal perception is also found to be significant.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in its attempt to explore the role of halal perception in the marketing of food products especially within the scope of a Muslim’s market. Besides, this study attempts to investigate the halal issue based on a specific model that includes potential variables and the intervening role of halal perception.

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Marco Tieman, Maznah Che Ghazali and Jack G.A.J. van der Vorst

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preferred minimum level of segregation for halal meat in supermarket, transport, storage and terminals; the responsibility…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preferred minimum level of segregation for halal meat in supermarket, transport, storage and terminals; the responsibility of halal logistics; and the willingness to pay for halal logistics in a Muslim and non‐Muslim country.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a comparative study involving Muslim consumers in Malaysia and The Netherlands. Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey with 251 Muslims in Malaysia and 250 Muslims in The Netherlands. Data were analysed by means of nonparametric tests.

Findings

There is a preferred higher level of segregation in a Muslim country than a non‐Muslim country. A Muslim country has a higher willingness to pay for a halal logistics system as compared to a non‐Muslim country. Furthermore, there lies a heavy responsibility with the manufacturer to extend halal assurance towards supply chain management.

Research limitations/implications

The study confirms there is a need for a different level of segregation and therefore different halal logistics standard in a Muslim country and a non‐Muslim country. However, during the survey in The Netherlands significant rejections were received from especially first generation Muslims due to the lack of understanding of the Dutch language. Similar surveys need to be conducted in other countries in order to be able to generalise over the various Islamic schools of thought, local fatwas and local customs.

Practical implications

Halal logistics is important to the Muslim consumer and critical for the trust in a halal certified brand, which requires extending halal integrity from point of production to the point of consumer purchase.

Originality/value

This study is a preliminary one investigating the consumer perception on halal logistics. The study indicates the level of segregation required for a halal meat supply chain in a Muslim and non‐Muslim country.

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