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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Anis Najiha Ahmad, Tajul A. Yang and Wan Nadiah Wan Abdullah

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived knowledge of the general concept of halal food and actual knowledge of halal food principles with emphasis on…

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1275

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived knowledge of the general concept of halal food and actual knowledge of halal food principles with emphasis on alcohol (alcoholic drinks and ethanol).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional descriptive survey, using quantitative research methods, was utilized. A self-administered survey was distributed to 188 undergraduate students of the food technology programme at Universiti Sains Malaysia, and a total of 114 responses were obtained.

Findings

Results indicate that respondents believed that they have above average competence regarding the concept, sources, ingredients, processing and the overall production of halal foods (score: 3.75-4.18). In addition, all of the 114 respondents also agreed that alcoholic drinks are fundamentally prohibited in Islam. However, the survey also revealed that the respondents were less certain about the application of alcohol in halal food production. Respondents’ actual knowledge on these issues was low to average.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by its cross-sectional nature. In addition, the research was only conducted on undergraduate-level students of the food technology programme, and therefore, results derived might not be generalized to the other segments of the population. The overall uncertainty and misconception about the application of alcohol in halal food highlights the need to improve the knowledge of these undergraduate students to more than a mere theory of the concepts of halal and haram.

Originality/value

No previous study has been conducted to explore the issue pertaining to alcohol in halal food, and this paper categorically strives to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Baharudin Othman, Sharifudin Md Shaarani and Arsiah Bahron

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of knowledge, halal dietary quality assurance practices, and commitment among food industries in the implementation of…

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3652

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the level of knowledge, halal dietary quality assurance practices, and commitment among food industries in the implementation of halal in Malaysia. Besides, the study was based on two categories that are considered major contributors in the chain of halal food sector in Malaysia which are the multinational, and small medium enterprise (SME).

Design/methodology/approach

Two company’s categories related to halal food and beverage industry which are the multinational, and SME were chosen in this research based on the similarities in terms of functions and needs in the implementation of halal in Malaysia. Furthermore, both categories are the main groups in the halal food sector that support the growth of other categories. The sample of the study was comprised of 241 companies from halal certification holders (MNCs=69; SMEs=172).Cross-sectional study through random sampling and purposive sampling was used where the internal halal committee who have been specifically appointed in the organization were asked to fill in the questionnaire. Personally hand-delivered questionnaires in workplaces was used as a method of data collection. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 21.

Findings

Based on the analysis, it was found that the level of knowledge, halal quality assurance practices and commitment to be at a good level. Whereas the results of inference showed that there are significant differences for the three variables studied.

Research limitations/implications

In the study there are some limitations, namely; first, the categories studied are focussed solely on halal food industry. Halal now been expanded to other products such as pharmaceutical, logistics, etc. Second, the standards used are the standard and guidelines on the handling of food. Finally, the limitations in obtaining more respondents as most industry in Malaysia is still concerned to provide feedback and view it as the secrecy of the company.

Practical implications

First, the implication of the theory and literature studies in which the research prevalence is associated with the ISO quality and quality management, integration of multiple disciplines and concepts is essential as a combination of elements of human capital and strategic management. Second, on behalf of the government or specially-appointed halal certification body, it can give a clear picture of the exposure and promotion related to the deed, procedures, and guidelines have gone through several changes and amendments. In addition, it is also able to evaluate the effectiveness of a number of conditions that are required such as internal halal appointment committee. Third for industry practitioners, focussing in delivering halal standards is not dependent on the system, working patterns, and technologies alone, but should also take into account the element of human capital and organizational responsibility in maintaining halal integrity and enhancing the knowledge and halal dietary management in accordance with the requirements of Islamic law and fatwa.

Social implications

On behalf of the users, the confidence is there and in order to produce a halal product, it involves a fairly strict chain and has always been regulated by a special committee whose role are meeting the needs outlined halal standards.

Originality/value

The study is the starting point in discussing in detail about the halal knowledge, halal quality assurance, and commitment after the standardization and harmonization of halal certification in early 2012. Furthermore, there are a few revisions on the act, standards, and procedures by the halal certification body, which halal assurance should be implemented and considered still new.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Tatiek Nurhayati and Hendar Hendar

This paper aims to increase knowledge about awareness and intention to choose the halal products. This study assessed the effect of intrinsic religiosity and knowledge of…

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1682

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to increase knowledge about awareness and intention to choose the halal products. This study assessed the effect of intrinsic religiosity and knowledge of halal products on the awareness and purchase intention of halal products. This study also investigated and examined the role of halal product awareness (HPA) in mediating the relationship between personal intrinsic religiosity (PIR) and halal product knowledge (HPK) with halal product intention (HPI). This knowledge will be very meaningful because there are still many types of products that are not halal certified circulating in the Muslim market segment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a self-administered questionnaire with closed questions. As many as 238 Muslim consumers in Indonesia over 17 years old were selected to be tested for regressive relationships from the four constructs. The Sobel test is then used to explain the mediating role of HPA.

Findings

This study shows that there is a relationship between PIR and HPK to HPA and HPI, and HPA to HPI. This study found that HPA was truly a partial mediation in the relationship between PIR and HPK with HPI.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted in the halal food sector in Indonesia and in certain cultural contexts so that the application of the same model in various sectors and countries can get various results. In addition, the respondents of this study were halal food customers; it would be very interesting to obtain data from other stakeholders such as halal food producers or retailers.

Originality/value

As per the authors’ knowledge, this study becomes the first study in Indonesia to examine the mediating role of HPA in the relationship of PIR and HPK with HPI. Conceptual discussion and results of empirical studies extend previous research on consumer behavior in the halal product market segment. An in-depth study of this phenomenon is expected to contribute in the development of science, especially Islamic marketing and customer behavior.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Baharudin Othman, Sharifudin Md. Shaarani and Arsiah Bahron

The purpose of this research is to observe how the industry’s knowledge, attitude and sensitivity of the industry to the government’s current policy regarding the halal

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1134

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to observe how the industry’s knowledge, attitude and sensitivity of the industry to the government’s current policy regarding the halal certification process influence the organization performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a self-administered questionnaire with closed-ended questions to measure the human capital factors and the practice of halal requirements. The questionnaire was distributed to multinational companies and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Malaysia, of which 206 responses were usable for analysis. The respondents were halal committee members in the respective companies. Smart PLS version 2.0 was used to analyze the relationship of each construct using the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. The outcome of this study showed a positive relationship between knowledge of and attitude and sensitivity toward government policies and organizational performance.

Findings

The outcome of this study showed a positive relationship between knowledge, attitude, sensitivity to government policy and organizational performance. The R2 value for the main model is 0.419, indicating that 41.9 per cent of the variance in the extent of collaboration can be explained by knowledge, attitude and sensitivity to government policies. Result also showed that all the hypotheses were supported and were significant at p < 0.01. It also showed that the control of an organization’s internal resources through human factors ranging from knowledge, attitude and sensitivity to government policies should be emphasized, as it is a contributing factor and it strives to improve organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

There were a limited number of respondents. A larger number of respondents would reflect a more accurate study. Besides, this study only focused on the halal food industry operators, while the presence of halal now covers other schemes such as logistics, consumer products and others. Moreover, this study only focused on two main groups: multinational companies and SMEs.

Practical implications

This study has provided some major implications. First, on behalf of the state, the results of this study clearly show that the human capital factor should be prioritized. Second, on behalf of the industry, this study can fill the void that exists in strengthening the industry through efforts to improve internal controls related to organizations including attending halal food courses and applying values among members of the organization. Third, the implication to theory and literature that the research-based view is suitable for use even in the food industry has been proved.

Social implications

The results of this study can increase consumer confidence in the management of an organization, especially in the halal food industry.

Originality/value

Halal’s rapid development has led many researchers to study halal. Till now, there is no research on three major areas of human capital aspects, namely, knowledge, attitude and sensitivity to governmental policies that involve internal halal committee members in the industry as subject of study in one model. Moreover, this research attempts to cover the latest acts, standards, procedures and guidelines provided by the government.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Talita Leoni Rizkitysha and Arga Hananto

Despite the high research interest regarding Halal products, most studies on Halal products focused on food and cosmetics. This study aims to examine the factors that…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the high research interest regarding Halal products, most studies on Halal products focused on food and cosmetics. This study aims to examine the factors that affect the attitude and purchase intention of non-food Halal products in a limited context of detergent products. This study is derived from the theory of reasoned action. It incorporates knowledge, religiosity and perceived usefulness of Halal label as antecedents of attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied a self-administered online questionnaire. Data were collected through an online survey with a non-probability sampling technique (convenience sampling). The study retained a total of 264 valid responses. The respondents mainly consisted of Muslim consumers from the 18–24 age group (62.5%), followed by the 25–31 age group (29.2%). Data were analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that attitude toward Halal-labeled detergent is affected by the perceived usefulness of the Halal label, and knowledge of Halal. Consequently, attitude toward Halal-labeled detergent positively affects intention to buy Halal-labeled detergent. This study also suggests that religiosity has a positive effect on the perceived usefulness of the Halal label and purchase intention of Halal detergent.

Originality/value

This study is among the few studies that discuss the antecedents and consequences of attitude toward Halal products in the context of detergent, a non-food Halal product category besides cosmetics. Muslim consumer responses toward Halal label were mostly researched in food and cosmetics contexts, while in some countries such as Indonesia, Halal labeling on all products has recently become mandated by legislation. Hence, this study provides some insights regarding Muslim consumer’s attitudes toward Halal-labeled products besides food and cosmetics.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Reezlin Abdul Rahman, Mohd Salehuddin Mohd Zahari, Mohd Hafiz Hanafiah and Mohd Nor Mamat

The available research works dealing with Halal food are centrally concerned with the Halal certification, logistics, export market, consumer awareness and business ethics…

Abstract

Purpose

The available research works dealing with Halal food are centrally concerned with the Halal certification, logistics, export market, consumer awareness and business ethics with minimal study explores Muslim consumers’ purchase behaviour of Syubhah semi-processed food. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between Muslim consumers’ knowledge on the wholesomeness, labelling, trust and purchase behaviour of Syubhah semi-processed food.

Design/methodology/approach

The study respondents are Muslim consumers in the semi and rural areas. Through a self-administered survey, 780 usable responses were successfully collected. The study hypotheses were analysed using the partial least squares structural equation modelling. Mediation analyses were conducted, focusing on the effect of trust on the relationship between consumer knowledge on the wholesomeness, labelling and purchase behaviour of Syubhah semi-processed food.

Findings

This study confirms that lack of knowledge on the wholesomeness and labelling among the semi and rural Muslim consumers influences them to purchase the Syubhah semi-processed food. Trust significantly plays a significant mediation role on the consumer Syubhah semi-processed food purchase behaviour.

Originality/value

This study confirms there is lack of knowledge among the semi and rural Muslim consumers on Syubhah semi-processed food. Such pessimistic indications of Syubhah food products carry varying consequences and implications for Muslim consumers, Halal food producers and the relevant religious authorities.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Azmawani Abd Rahman, Ebrahim Asrarhaghighi and Suhaimi Ab Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to add to the body of knowledge about attitude and intention to choose a Halal product. Despite the importance of the Halal cosmetic market…

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9336

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to the body of knowledge about attitude and intention to choose a Halal product. Despite the importance of the Halal cosmetic market for both producers and consumers, the existing literature focusses on Halal food products, and only a limited number of studies exist about Halal cosmetic products. This study assesses the effects of knowledge and religiosity on attitudes towards Halal cosmetics products, as well as the effect of those attitudes on the intention to buy the Halal cosmetic products. This study also investigates the existence of differences between consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetics and Halal food products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a self-administrated questionnaire with closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was distributed using non-probability convenience sampling. At the end of data collection period, a total of 110 usable questionnaires from Muslim respondents over the age of 18 years old were used for further analysis. To assess the relationship between knowledge, religiosity, attitude and intention, a structural equation modeling technique was used. And to investigate the difference between attitude and intention for Halal cosmetic and Halal food products, the pair sample t-test were applied.

Findings

The findings of the study show that the relationship between knowledge and attitude is insignificant, but there is a significant positive relationship between religiosity and attitude. From the lens of theory of reasoned action (TRA), this study indicates that there is a positive relationship between attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetic products. This study also found a significant difference between consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetics and attitudes towards Halal food products, as well as consumers’ intentions to choose Halal cosmetics and intentions to choose Halal food products among Malaysian consumers. Moreover, the results indicate that Malaysian consumers have more positive attitudes and intentions towards Halal food products than towards Halal cosmetic products.

Research limitations/implications

Because the sample of the study is limited to consumers from one country (Malaysia), it is suggested that the future studies choose their samples from consumers in different countries.

Practical implications

The results of the study give implication to firms competing in the cosmetic industry. Religiosity is one of the main factors that should be taken into account in promoting their cosmetic products. Also, as the relationship between attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetics is similar to the relationship for Halal foods, marketers may try similar ways to promote both the products. However, the attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetics is still lower than Halal foods.

Social implications

The result of this study provides an insight for the Malaysian consumers to realize whether knowledge and religiosity have any relationship towards consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetic products. The results also provide information to consumers that they are more likely to have stronger attitudes towards Halal food products than the cosmetic products. This study will be significant to the consumers, the importer and exporter, the producer and marketer and the researcher as well as the government.

Originality/value

This study is the first study which has assessed the antecedents and consequence of consumers’ attitude towards Halal cosmetic products in one model. Moreover, this research is among the first attempts to investigate the significant difference in Malaysian consumers’ attitude and intention between Halal cosmetic and food products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Hanif Adinugroho Widyanto and Imaduena Aesa Tibela Sitohang

This paper aims to investigate the antecedents of Muslim millennial’s purchase intention for halal-certified cosmetics and pharmaceutical products by expanding the theory…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the antecedents of Muslim millennial’s purchase intention for halal-certified cosmetics and pharmaceutical products by expanding the theory of reasoned action (TRA) through the inclusion of religiousity (RG), halal knowledge and halal certification as the exogenous constructs in addition to TRA’s subjective norm, with attitude as the mediating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 403 Muslim millennial customers of cosmetics and pharmaceutical products from the Greater Jakarta area, Indonesia. The data were analysed using partial least squares method.

Findings

Based on the study, attitude fully and/or partially mediates all the exogenous variables. RG and subjective norm are found to have no direct and significant relationship to purchase intention, but they indirectly affect the latter through attitude. Finally, both halal knowledge and halal certification have partial mediation with purchase intention through attitude as the mediating variable.

Practical implications

By understanding the relationships between the latent constructs, halal players in the industry could use the findings to better comprehend the urgency and importance of the halal aspects of their products, particularly halal certification, with regards to the Muslim millennials, and devise appropriate policies and strategies to capture the increasingly potential slice of the market.

Originality/value

The extant literature on halal products has mostly examined the food industry, and little attention has been given to the halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical products, inspite of its growing importance in Indonesia as the world’s largest halal market. Unlike earlier studies on the topic, this study also limits its focus on the Muslim millennial consumers, which is arguably the most potential and lucrative share of the halal market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Norazah Mohd Suki and Abang Sulaiman Abang Salleh

Muslim consumers’ tendency to patronize stores with Halal images and purchase genuine Halal products is closely related to their effort to maintain Islamic identity, and…

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1089

Abstract

Purpose

Muslim consumers’ tendency to patronize stores with Halal images and purchase genuine Halal products is closely related to their effort to maintain Islamic identity, and this is further supported by many empirical data. Therefore, this paper aims to examine the relationships between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and Halal principle knowledge and their effect on Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores. On top of that, the mediating effect of Halal image on these relationships is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analyzed using multiple and hierarchical regression analysis to test the model via the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software among 480 valid samples of Muslim consumers.

Findings

Empirical results of the hierarchical regression analysis and the Sobel test revealed that there is a significant mediating effect of Halal image on the relationship between consumers’ attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control of consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores. Consumers with high attentiveness of the stores’ Halal image have a positive impression of the stores, a high motivation to patronize and, without any conditions, may follow through their intention to patronize the retail stores.

Practical implications

This research study offers guidelines to the retailers, marketers and the authorities in enhancing marketing strategies and the implementation of stricter Halal consumption laws. Hence, this research puts forward the following strategies: adopting Halal marketing strategy, promoting Halal images in retail stores and reinforcing Halal principle knowledge in the mind of consumers.

Originality/value

The main theoretical contribution relates to the insertion of the Halal image as a mediating variable in the matter of Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize Halal stores in Malaysia. An inspection of the effect of Halal principle knowledge on Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores is also rewarding.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, Serge Gabarre, Bilal Eneizan and Nabihah Asri

This paper aims to identify the factors of willingness to pay for halal transportation among Muslim consumers in Malaysia by extending the theory of planned behaviour with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the factors of willingness to pay for halal transportation among Muslim consumers in Malaysia by extending the theory of planned behaviour with knowledge and religiosity.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to Muslim consumers at Malls in Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya. From 250 Muslims who were approached, 200 respondents agreed to answer the questionnaire. SMART-PLS 3.2.8. was used to analyse the data for this study using a structural equation modelling (SEM) approach.

Findings

Attitude (ATT), Subjective Norm (SN) and Perceived Behavioural Control (PBC) have a positive relationship with the Willingness to Pay (WTP). However, religiosity is found as an insignificant factor towards the WTP. Knowledge and religiosity are significant predictors of the attitude. Attitude is found to have a mediating effect on the relationship between knowledge and the WTP, and for religiosity towards the WTP. Awareness moderates the positive relationship between ATT and the WTP for halal transportation services. Meanwhile, awareness is found as an insignificant moderator between SN and the WTP, and for the PBC and the WTP.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful information on the WTP for halal transportation. Related parties such as the government, halal transport service providers and customers can use these findings to plan further action to enhance the WTP for halal transportation

Originality/value

The study reveals the capability of the TPB to identify the factors of WTP for halal transportation among Muslim consumers in Malaysia. The findings also show the moderation effects of awareness on the TPB. The findings also enrich the literature on the WTP in halal studies

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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