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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Carrie Amani Annabi and Olufunbi Olajumoke Ibidapo-Obe

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that halal certification organisations (HCOs) play in the UK in assuring quality in halal cosmetics.

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2355

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that halal certification organisations (HCOs) play in the UK in assuring quality in halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study evaluates whether halal certification assures the quality of halal cosmetic products. This research evaluated the quality assurance systems of major UK HCOs, using a hypothetical product as a test vehicle. The investigation considered whether these organisations differ in their definition of “halal” and “halal cosmetics” and also considered how effectively their certification signals quality assurance.

Findings

The study indicated that there is a failure to adopt holistic halal terminology which implies that within the UK halal cosmetics industry, manufacturers may not be working within agreed standards for halal product integrity.

Research limitations/implications

This study focussed on UK certification for halal cosmetics by three HCOs and disregarded other forms of halal businesses. The literature review is based solely on literature available in the English language. The study lacks generalisability, as only one hypothetical product was tested; therefore, it was not possible to reach an understanding of all the costs involved in UK HCO certification.

Practical implications

This study undertook a comprehensive literature review on halal certification to produce a comparison of halal sanctioning laws, certification processes and the level of supply chain verification by UK HCOs.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the knowledge on UK halal certification.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Baharudin Othman, Sharifudin Md. Shaarani and Arsiah Bahron

The purpose of this research is to observe how the industry’s knowledge, attitude and sensitivity of the industry to the government’s current policy regarding the halal

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1196

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to observe how the industry’s knowledge, attitude and sensitivity of the industry to the government’s current policy regarding the halal certification process influence the organization performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a self-administered questionnaire with closed-ended questions to measure the human capital factors and the practice of halal requirements. The questionnaire was distributed to multinational companies and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Malaysia, of which 206 responses were usable for analysis. The respondents were halal committee members in the respective companies. Smart PLS version 2.0 was used to analyze the relationship of each construct using the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. The outcome of this study showed a positive relationship between knowledge of and attitude and sensitivity toward government policies and organizational performance.

Findings

The outcome of this study showed a positive relationship between knowledge, attitude, sensitivity to government policy and organizational performance. The R2 value for the main model is 0.419, indicating that 41.9 per cent of the variance in the extent of collaboration can be explained by knowledge, attitude and sensitivity to government policies. Result also showed that all the hypotheses were supported and were significant at p < 0.01. It also showed that the control of an organization’s internal resources through human factors ranging from knowledge, attitude and sensitivity to government policies should be emphasized, as it is a contributing factor and it strives to improve organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

There were a limited number of respondents. A larger number of respondents would reflect a more accurate study. Besides, this study only focused on the halal food industry operators, while the presence of halal now covers other schemes such as logistics, consumer products and others. Moreover, this study only focused on two main groups: multinational companies and SMEs.

Practical implications

This study has provided some major implications. First, on behalf of the state, the results of this study clearly show that the human capital factor should be prioritized. Second, on behalf of the industry, this study can fill the void that exists in strengthening the industry through efforts to improve internal controls related to organizations including attending halal food courses and applying values among members of the organization. Third, the implication to theory and literature that the research-based view is suitable for use even in the food industry has been proved.

Social implications

The results of this study can increase consumer confidence in the management of an organization, especially in the halal food industry.

Originality/value

Halal’s rapid development has led many researchers to study halal. Till now, there is no research on three major areas of human capital aspects, namely, knowledge, attitude and sensitivity to governmental policies that involve internal halal committee members in the industry as subject of study in one model. Moreover, this research attempts to cover the latest acts, standards, procedures and guidelines provided by the government.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Awal Fuseini, Phil Hadley and Toby Knowles

Because of the economic significance of the Halal meat market, many food business operators have started trading in Halal meat products. Some businesses rely solely on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the economic significance of the Halal meat market, many food business operators have started trading in Halal meat products. Some businesses rely solely on the services of Halal certification bodies (HCBs) to assure Halal consumers as to the authenticity of Halal meat products. However, the lack of unified national or global Halal standards has resulted in confusion as to what is authentic Halal. This paper aims to survey HCBs in the UK to highlight the major differences between the various Halal standards with regard to Halal meat production.

Design/methodology/approach

Out of 15 HCBs that the authors contacted, 9 agreed to participate in the study. Respondents were asked to indicate what slaughter practices are acceptable according to their standard and further indicate if their respective organisations carried out speciation testing to detect the presence of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid in certified Halal products.

Findings

All nine certifiers indicated that they owned and operated according to a written Halal standard. The majority of certifiers indicated that they accepted pre-slaughter stunning if the stunning did not result in the death of animals prior to exsanguination, a Muslim should perform the slaughter and a short prayer must be recited and only manual (by hand) slaughter is acceptable.

Research limitations/implications

The findings give an insight into acceptable and prohibited procedures during Halal meat production in the UK. Abattoir operators, meat processors and retailers can use this as a guide when selecting suitable Halal certifiers for their businesses.

Originality/value

The study reveals that there are a number of HCBs in the UK who are all operating according to the different interpretation of the Halal dietary laws. The paper further highlights the different slaughter procedures that are acceptable and prohibited to different certifiers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Shahbaz Khan, Mohd Imran Khan and Abid Haleem

Higher level of customer satisfaction for halal products can be achieved by the effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA)…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher level of customer satisfaction for halal products can be achieved by the effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA). There are certain issues that seem detrimental towards the adoption of HCAA. The purpose of this paper is to identify the major barriers towards the adoption of HCAA and evaluate inter-relationships among them for developing the strategies to mitigate these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The barriers towards the adoption of HCAA are identified through an integrative approach of literature review and expert’s opinion. The inter-relationship among the identified barriers is evaluated using fuzzy-based decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (fuzzy DEMATEL) technique, which categorises them into influential and influenced group.

Findings

The evaluation of inter-relationship among barriers using fuzzy DEMATEL indicates four influencing barriers and six influenced barriers towards the adoption of HCAA. Further, findings suggest an extensive government, and management support is vital in terms of commitment, resources and actions to realise the benefits attributed with HCAA.

Research limitations/implications

The inter-relationship among barriers is contextual and based on the perception of experts which may be biased as per their background and area of expertise. This study pertains to a specific region and can be extended to the generalised certification system.

Originality/value

The empirical base of the research provides the inter-relationship among the barriers towards the adoption of HCAA which can be effectively used as input in the decision-making process by producers, manufacturers and distributor. The policy maker can analyse the cause group and effect group of barriers to formulate policies that would help in the adoption of HCAA.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Aishath Muneeza and Zakariya Mustapha

This paper aims to examine existing Halal certification regime in Maldives and address impediments therein that challenge and inhibit the growth of the country’s Halal

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine existing Halal certification regime in Maldives and address impediments therein that challenge and inhibit the growth of the country’s Halal industry in relation to fisheries products.

Design/methodology/approach

This is qualitative research based on first-hand experiences of the authors in the Halal certification process in the Maldives. Doctrinal methodology is used in the analysis of primary sources of data, including Maldivian laws and Halal certification regulations to identify issues of practical relevance. This is complemented with content analysis of secondary data sourced from journal articles, books, reports and online databases that were examined in identifying hindrances and loopholes in the Halal certification process.

Findings

Fish is generally Halal, but processed fisheries products cannot be so deemed when certain additives and enhancers are constituents therein. At the moment, Maldives Halal certification pertains only to fisheries products. Against this backdrop, this research identifies knowledge gap, legal and governance constraints pertaining to capacity as impediments towards the Halal certification of such products in the Maldives. Such concerns hinder the Maldives from tapping the socio-economic benefits of the Halal certification of its fisheries products to the desired level in the development of its Halal industry.

Research limitations/implications

This is pioneer research with reference to the Maldives. Absence of researches on the subject brings about scantily available secondary data in the area. Moreover, no empirical data were involved in conducting the research.

Practical implications

As the only products subject of Halal certification process, this research offers an insight into the regulations underpinning Halal certification of fisheries products and related impediments thereto in developing the Maldivian Halal industry generally. Identifying and understanding the impediments to Halal certification process would facilitate their elimination and promote Halal certified fisheries products.

Originality/value

This research highlights and evaluates the Halal certification regime in the Maldives and provides a starting point for further research thereon. The research contributes towards making robust and standard Halal certification criterion and paves the way forward for developing the Halal industry in the Maldives.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Abid Haleem, Mohd Imran Khan and Shahbaz Khan

Need for effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA) is imperative for the higher level of customer satisfaction. To achieve…

Abstract

Purpose

Need for effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA) is imperative for the higher level of customer satisfaction. To achieve this, all stakeholders need to be involved in developing the policy. Thus, this study aims to identify barriers to the adoption of HCAA and analyses through structural model of interrelated barriers

Design/methodology/approach

The structural and hierarchical model of barriers to the adoption of HCAA is developed after extensive systematic literature survey along with opinions from various types of experts. Interpretive structural modelling is identified as the appropriate tool in making this model, which is further analysed using MICMAC (Matriced’ Impacts croises-multipication applique’ and classment). Corresponding issues for every barrier as identified may help in further developing the action plan for each stakeholder. Objectives and action plan for various stakeholders were evolved and provided.

Findings

The significant finding indicates to developing a globally accepted halal certifying organisation, as to contain the mislabelling, and this further needs extensive government and customer support. The customer needs to be more aware of the proper idea of halal. Therefore, to succeed, the industry needs to develop a brand identity with a distinct/unique/clear marketing message, not just certifying products/services as halal.

Originality/value

Specific direction for different stakeholders has been derived along with academic finding for researchers and to further develop the action plan.

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2018

Khawaja Muhammad Imran Bashir, Jin-Soo Kim, Md Mohibbullah, Jae Hak Sohn and Jae-Suk Choi

This study aims to investigate the current and future status of overseas halal food marketing and develops strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood…

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1204

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the current and future status of overseas halal food marketing and develops strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the global halal food market.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a case study approach and a semi-structured review of previously published data. Evidence collected from literature reviews, supported by research studies, anecdotal proof, personal reflection and experience is also used. It also considers the perspectives of various stakeholder groups in the global halal food supply chain.

Findings

The global halal food market is forecasted to reach US$1.914tn in 2021. At present, Korea holds a small share of this market. To enter the emerging Islamic market, there is a need to develop strategies. This study recommends the following main strategies to improve the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the halal food market: reduce mistrust by improving halal authentication and certification standards; understand consumer behavior and develop marketing strategies according to the respective country’s socioeconomic and geographic status; train industry employees and develop competitive halal seafood products; exploit the rising global influence of Hanryu; establish a halal logistics/supply chain and halal industrial parks; and promote digital marketing and tourism. Moreover, the government should also subsidize halal seafood development, as well as provide export and international trade insurances.

Originality/value

As the Muslim population continues to grow, the importance of global halal food marketing also increases. Therefore, strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the global halal food market need to be taken into account.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Shuko Takeshita

The purpose of this study is to clarify what is really needed to attract Muslim tourists by comparing the two main approaches to serving food with halal certification or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to clarify what is really needed to attract Muslim tourists by comparing the two main approaches to serving food with halal certification or with ingredient disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted a comparative analysis of a Group promoting “halal certification” and a Group promoting “ingredient disclosure” mainly from the tourists’ perspective. Taito Ward, Tokyo, encourages restaurants to obtain halal certification, while the approach of Takayama City is to disclose the ingredients. The study compares the advantages and disadvantages of these two approaches and also investigates factors influencing them.

Findings

This study revealed that Muslim tourists would like to see both halal certification and ingredient disclosure. The reason why Taito Ward and Takayama City pursue different strategies can be summarized in three points: the types of food offered in the two areas, the vastly different scales of the two areas as tourist destinations and the different perspectives of their respective advisors.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include the small sample size and the low diversity of the origins of Muslim tourists. However, this research is still significant because few academic studies on halal certification have been done from the tourists’ perspective.

Originality/value

There are many things that could be done to attract Muslim tourists. Even without halal certification, there are many restaurants that can cater to Muslims in Japan. A little consideration and thoughtfulness on the part of restaurants can enhance the probability of attracting Muslim tourists.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Yusuf Hassan and Anirban Sengupta

India has an over-180-million Muslim population, which makes it an ideal marketplace for halal products. However, not much research has been done to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

India has an over-180-million Muslim population, which makes it an ideal marketplace for halal products. However, not much research has been done to understand the opportunities and challenges pertaining to halal business in India. The purpose of this study is to explore and examine how halal products are perceived by the Indian consumer and how these products are creating values for a larger consumer base.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using an inductive approach. To understand the peculiarities of the issue, the authors also used the case-research approach to develop a broader understanding of the topic.

Findings

Findings of this study show that the market and consumers are increasingly becoming more aware of halal products in India. Further, the demand for such products is no longer limited to Muslims. Halal products have also become an attractive option for consumers, as they are also addressing safety and environmental concerns. This is an essential factor for a flourishing certification business in India.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is a quantitative study which could have been conducted to confirm the findings of this research. Further, the sample was limited to participants in the age group of 21-30 years. Older people might share a different perspective on halal products because they are believed to be more experienced and socially conscious. Further, our cases were limited to a certifying agency and cosmetics agencies.

Practical implications

One important implication of this study is that it reaffirms the success of Islamic branding in the India context. Though this research was carried out on a limited scale, it opens up opportunities to examine the halal phenomenon in more detail. Acceptability of halal products among non-Muslims is a sign of growing tolerance among different communities to accept and adopt culture and practices of a different religion in their daily living.

Social implications

The authors have observed that halal products and Islamic branding as a whole can positively help in reshaping the image of Islam across the globe. Observations such as identifying halal products being eco-friendly reflects the increased sensitivity among the consumers in the developing nations, which were earlier a behavior common among the Westerners.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other study has been done to explore the halal product market and consumers’ perception in the Indian context. This is particularly an important contribution because India is a home for over 180 million Muslims and a marketplace worth trillions of dollars. Further, past research in the area of religious marketing was limited to conceptual papers. This paper is an attempt to re-initiate discussion through empirical studies on Islamic branding in the emerging economies context.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Muhammad Mohsin Butt, Susan Rose, Stephen Wilkins and Junaid Ul Haq

Multinational corporations (MNCs) that want to compete in markets worldwide should not underestimate the influences of religion on consumer demand. Almost one quarter of…

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2055

Abstract

Purpose

Multinational corporations (MNCs) that want to compete in markets worldwide should not underestimate the influences of religion on consumer demand. Almost one quarter of the world’s population is Muslim so it is important for MNCs to get into the Muslim mind set when operating in countries where Islam has a large influence. The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to which consumer-based brand equity in a religious market results from the psychological and behavioural characteristics of consumers rather than from product characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey method was adopted, using a total sample of 551 Muslim consumers in Malaysia and Pakistan. A holistic model conceptualising three potential psychological and behavioural predictors of consumer-based halal brand equity (CBHBE) was created and then tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The strength of an individual’s religious identity was found to be a strong predictor of consumer halal choice behaviour and perceived self-expressive religious benefits. Consumers’ halal choice behaviour and perceived self-expressive benefits directly predict CBHBE. Moreover, consumer halal choice behaviour partially mediates the relationship between self-expressive benefits and CBHBE.

Practical implications

The authors conclude that firms targeting Muslim consumers can maximise CBHBE by focussing their marketing strategies on the three psychological and behavioural constructs identified in the model. For example, by using halal certification logos and providing convincing information about the halalness of their brand, businesses can facilitate Muslim consumers’ search processes in relation to their choice behaviour.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing international branding literature in two main ways. First, it introduces and defines the concept of CBHBE. Second, it identifies and empirically validates the important psychological and behavioural predictors of CBHBE.

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