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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Kamel El Hedhli, Imene Becheur, Haithem Zourrig and Walid Chaouali

Although shopping well-being has become a focal construct in retail shopping studies, little is known about the key drivers of this construct. This study aims to further…

Abstract

Purpose

Although shopping well-being has become a focal construct in retail shopping studies, little is known about the key drivers of this construct. This study aims to further discern some of the key antecedents of shopping well-being by particularly focusing on the role of congruity. Furthermore, the study explores whether shoppers’ demographic characteristics moderate the effects of congruity on shopping well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a survey of actual shoppers in two urban Canadian shopping malls via a mall intercept. Structural equation modeling using SmartPLS was conducted to validate the study’s model.

Findings

Functional congruity has a stronger effect than self-congruity on shopping well-being. Shoppers’ demographic variables do not generally act as moderators in the investigated linkages.

Practical implications

This study can help mall managers formulate better marketing programs that would ultimately enhance shopping well-being.

Originality/value

The study advances the retailing literature by putting forward a conceptual model that remedies identified shortcomings related to functional and self-congruity and establishes new linkages between functional congruity, self-congruity and shopping well-being. Furthermore, the study explores whether shoppers’ demographic variables moderate the effects of functional and self-congruity on shopping well-being.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Haithem Zourrig, Mengxia Zhang, Kamel El Hedhli and Imene Becheur

This study aims to apply McCornack’s (1992) information manipulation theory to the context of fraud and investigates the effects of culture on perceived deceptiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to apply McCornack’s (1992) information manipulation theory to the context of fraud and investigates the effects of culture on perceived deceptiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 400 Chinese consumers and an equal-size sample of Canadian consumers were recruited to fill an online survey. The survey integrates four scenarios of insurance fraud and measures of perceived deceptiveness, cultural tightness and horizontal-vertical idiocentrism allocentrism, in addition to some control variables.

Findings

Results show that at the societal level of culture, perceived deceptiveness is higher in individualistic than in collectivistic cultures. When accounting for the level of situational constraint, cultural tightness was found to magnify the perceived deceptiveness. At the individual level of culture, vertical-allocentrism and vertical-idiocentrism were found to weigh against the perception of deceptiveness.

Originality/value

Understanding cultural differences in perceived deceptiveness is helpful to spot sources of consumers’ vulnerability to fraud tolerance among a culturally diverse public.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2018

Haithem Zourrig, Jeongsoo Park, Kamel El Hedhli and Mengxia Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how cultural tightness may influence consumers’ attitudes toward insurance services and occurrence of insurance fraud.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how cultural tightness may influence consumers’ attitudes toward insurance services and occurrence of insurance fraud.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on Gelfand et al.’s (2011) theory of tight and loose cultures, the authors theorize that perceived wrongness of insurance fraud, fraud occurrence and perceived risk of being caught depend on the cultural tightness. Using field data from a global European social survey (ESS), the authors investigate these differences across two fairly different European countries – Norway (i.e. tight culture) and Ukraine (i.e. loose culture).

Findings

Consumers from tight culture report less tolerance for insurance fraud (inflating insurance claim) are less likely to commit an insurance fraud, and they perceive higher level of risk of being caught than their counterparts from loose culture (Ukraine).

Practical implications

Understanding cultural variability in attitude toward insurance fraud, the occurrence of insurance fraud and the sensitivity to the risk of being caught could enrich the authors knowledge about how to prevent insurance fraud.

Social implications

Consumer protection agencies, consumer educators and policymakers could all benefit from understanding cultural variability in attitude toward fraud. This will potentially help to design effective learning and education programs to sensitize customers to the illegal and unethical aspects of fraudulent behaviors.

Originality/value

Insurance fraud is a universal issue and exists in many European countries, yet no previous work has investigated the effect of cultural tightness–looseness on fraud perception.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Haithem Zourrig and Jean‐Charles Chebat

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of social exchanges between customers that may occur in a queue, on the waiting experience's evaluation and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of social exchanges between customers that may occur in a queue, on the waiting experience's evaluation and its implication for the customer service management.

Design/methodology/approach

Extant literature on social exchanges between customers within consumption environment is reviewed pertaining to the interrelationships between customer‐to‐customer interactions, atmospherics' perception and waiting time evaluation. A conceptual model is built upon the reviewed literature illustrating the relationships between main concepts of the study.

Findings

The insights from this work suggest that making interactions between customers more enjoyable may reduce waiting time perception. In contrast, if the customer‐to‐customer interaction is perceived as negative, this may increase the waiting time evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

Albeit conceptual and exploratory in nature, this paper is intended as a beginning for further empirical validation of the effect of customer‐to‐customer interaction on the waiting experience.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated explicitly the impact of customer‐to‐customer interactions on waiting time evaluation. This paper suggests that social exchanges that may occur in the queue may affect the customer's waiting experience.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Haithem Zourrig, Jean‐Charles Chebat and Roy Toffoli

The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper insight on the psychological mechanism of customer forgiveness viewed from a cross cultural perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper insight on the psychological mechanism of customer forgiveness viewed from a cross cultural perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the cognitive appraisal theory, this paper relates forgiveness cognitive, emotional and motivational patterns with differences in cultural values' orientations.

Findings

The insights from this paper suggest that idiocentric customers are more likely to adopt problem solving strategies when they decide to forgive, whereas allocentric ones tend to regulate their emotional responses to their environment such as expressing benevolence and goodwill, as they are more sensitive to maintaining connectedness within group members.

Research limitations/implications

Albeit conceptual and exploratory in nature, this paper is intended as a beginning for further empirical validation and theoretical refinement. The paper contends that forgiveness is a dynamic, interactive process that should be investigated with different sequential orders. Furthermore, as customer forgiveness is related to time, longitudinal studies are more appropriate to test the proposed model.

Practical implications

Firms serving international markets as well as multiethnic ones would have advantage to understand cultural differences in shaping customer forgiveness. This is relevant to conceive efficient marketing strategies aiming at managing interpersonal conflicts with wronged customers and promoting benevolence and goodwill.

Originality/value

Little is known about customer forgiveness. This paper adds a new insight by examining cultural effects on forgiveness process, allowing for a more comprehensive view of customer forgiveness triggers.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Haithem Zourrig, Kamel Hedhli and Jean Charles Chebat

– This paper aims to investigate the cultural variability in assessing the severity of a service failure.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the cultural variability in assessing the severity of a service failure.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate studies were conducted. The first investigates differences in the perception of service failures across two cultural pools of subjects (allocentrics versus idiocentrics) and within a same country. The second contrasts two levels of comparisons: a cross-cultural values’ level and a cross-country level, to assess differences in the perception service failures’ severity.

Findings

Results showed that cultural values differences, when investigated at the individual level (i.e. idiocentrism versus allocentrism) are more significant to understand the influence of culture on the perception of severity, that is, allocentrics perceive more severity in the service failure than idiocentrics. However, a cross-country comparison (i.e. USA versus Puerto Rico) does not show significant differences.

Research limitations/implications

Customers may assess, with different sensitivities, the severity of a service failure. These differences are mainly explained by differences in cultural values’ orientations but not differences across countries. Even originating from a same country, customers could perceive with different degrees the seriousness of a same service failure as they may cling to different cultural values. Hence, it is increasingly important to examine the cultural differences at the individual-level rather than a country level.

Practical implications

Firms serving international markets as well as multiethnic ones would have advantage to understand cultural differences in the perception of the severity at the individual level rather than at the societal or country level. This is more helpful to direct appropriate service recovery strategies to customers who may have higher sensitivity to the service failure.

Originality/value

Little is known about the effect of culture on the severity evaluation, although investigating cross-cultural differences in the assessment of severity is relevant to understand whether offenses are perceived more seriously in one culture than another and then if these offenses will potentially arise confrontational behaviors or not.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Organizations often pride themselves on a willingness to learn from their mistakes. A bad service encounter, with the resulting negative feedback, can be turned into a positive – something to be learned from. However, while it might be relatively easy to apologize to and/or compensate someone who has written an angry letter of complaint, there's little that can be done about the aggrieved customer who just decides to walk away.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

This briefing provides insights on the cultural environment and changes that need to occur to implement innovation planning methods within large enterprises.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

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