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1 – 10 of 15

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter analyses the how, who, where and why of rapid rise in intra-regional investment by companies from ASEAN since 2009.

Methodology/approach

The chapter analyses the push and pull factors of intra-regional investment in ASEAN, the resulting patterns of foreign direct investment (FDI) and the accompanying rise of strong regional players.

Findings

The region’s FDI landscape is changing in terms of investment sources, players, FDI trends and dynamics of the region. This trend is strongly affected by stepped up efforts by ASEAN governments to encourage their national companies to invest in the region and the influence of the ASEAN Economic Community.

Implications

Regional integration and emerging business opportunities are providing an impetus not seen before in driving intra-regional investment. As more ASEAN companies position and prepare for AEC 2015, this intra-regional investment wave is likely to gather force.

Originality/value

The chapter lists the regional and global ‘footprint’ of the top 50 largest ASEAN companies by revenues. The thus identified companies include companies operating in oil and gas, mining, agri-business, telecommunications, food and beverages, manufacturing, banking, power generation, infrastructure, real estate and healthcare services

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Axèle Giroud and Hafiz Mirza

The purpose of this paper is to show how the nature of the activities conducted by multinational enterprises globally and the governance modes are changing. Essentially…

1085

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the nature of the activities conducted by multinational enterprises globally and the governance modes are changing. Essentially, multinational enterprises (MNEs) structure and organize their activities in a more complex, fragmented and geographically dispersed manner. In this paper, the authors suggest that the evolution of MNEs and the rising importance of global value chains (GVCs) require a refinement of FDI motivations rather than a drastic change in the existing categories. The authors begin with a historical overview of evolving firms’ international strategies and FDI motivations, before developing arguments to support the view that the fine slicing of economic activities on a global scale, and the combination of governance modalities ought to be integrated into the presentation of investment motivations. The discussion ends with implications for governments and policymaking.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper.

Findings

Key suggestions to refine the presentation of investment motivations are presented, together with policy recommendations.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel approach to ways of refining investment motivations by integrating GVC considerations, and drawing policy implications from this process.

Details

The Multinational Business Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Barbara Myloni, Anne‐Wil K. Harzing and Hafiz Mirza

This paper concerns the transfer of human resource management (HRM) practices by multinational companies (MNCs) to their overseas subsidiaries. It investigates how factors…

14698

Abstract

This paper concerns the transfer of human resource management (HRM) practices by multinational companies (MNCs) to their overseas subsidiaries. It investigates how factors originating from the cultural and institutional framework of the host country impact on this transfer. Using data collected from MNC subsidiaries located in Greece and local Greek firms, we examine the degree to which several HRM practices in MNC subsidiaries resemble local practices. Our empirical findings indicate that subsidiaries have adapted their HRM practices to a considerable extent, although some practices are more localised than others. Specifically, practices that do not fit well with Greek culture or are in contrast to employee regulations show a low level of transfer. On the other hand, our interviews revealed that significant cultural changes are underway and that the institutional environment is gradually getting more relaxed, leaving more room to manoeuvre for MNCs.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2014

Abstract

Details

International Business and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-990-4

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2009

Melody L. Wollan, Mary F. Sully de Luque and Marko Grunhagen

This paper suggests that motives for engaging in affiliative‐promotive “helping” extra‐role behavior is related to cross‐cultural differences. The cultural dimensions of in‐group…

Abstract

This paper suggests that motives for engaging in affiliative‐promotive “helping” extra‐role behavior is related to cross‐cultural differences. The cultural dimensions of in‐group collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, performance orientation, and humane orientation, and their differential effect on helping extra‐role behavior in a diverse workforce are examined. Theoretical implications provide guidance for future empirical research in this area, and provide managers with more realistic expectations of employee performance in the workplace.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Socrates Papadopoulos

This article concentrates on the application of econometrics in the development of international tourism marketing strategies. In particular it examines how empirical results can…

Abstract

This article concentrates on the application of econometrics in the development of international tourism marketing strategies. In particular it examines how empirical results can be related to a market choice matrix in identifying the most attractive countries for allocating marketing resources and limited promotional funds.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2009

Tao (Tony) Gao and Talin E. Sarraf

This paper explores the major factors influencing multinational companies’ (MNCs) propensity to change the level of resource commitments during financial crises in emerging…

1052

Abstract

This paper explores the major factors influencing multinational companies’ (MNCs) propensity to change the level of resource commitments during financial crises in emerging markets. Favorable changes in the host government policies, market demand, firm strategy, and infrastructural conditions are hypothesized to influence the MNCs’ decision to increase resource commitments during a crisis. The hypotheses are tested with data collected in a survey of 82 MNCs during the recent Argentine financial crisis (late 2002). While all the above variables are considered by the respondents as generally important reasons for increasing resource commitments during a crisis, only favorable changes in government policies significantly influence MNCs’ decisions to change the level of resource commitments during the Argentine financial crisis. The research, managerial implications, and policy‐making implications are discussed.

Abstract

Details

International Business and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-990-4

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Michael J. Morley and David G. Collings

This paper focuses on the debates about globalisation – its nature and impact – and the significance of multinational companies in the global economy. Introduces the special issue…

13764

Abstract

This paper focuses on the debates about globalisation – its nature and impact – and the significance of multinational companies in the global economy. Introduces the special issue of the International Journal of Manpower, based on selected papers presented at the 7th Conference on International Human Resource Management hosted by the University of Limerick in June 2003, which focused on the issue of HRM and its transferability in such corporations. The MNC is viewed as the vehicle by which dominant HR policies and practices are transported across national boundaries and the papers shed light on the likelihood of, and limits, to this transfer. In order to contextualise the debate, the paper begins by outlining the extent to which human resource management remains a key issue for multinational corporations and, in advance of introducing the five papers in this special issue, summarily charts some of the key research trends emerging in the literature on international human resource management (IHRM).

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2023

Hafiz Muhammad Muien, Sabariah Nordin and Bazeet Olayemi Badru

As the benefit of gender diversity continues to receive significant attention, a holistic investigation of its effect on corporate financial distress (CFD) is lacking. Therefore…

Abstract

Purpose

As the benefit of gender diversity continues to receive significant attention, a holistic investigation of its effect on corporate financial distress (CFD) is lacking. Therefore, this study examines the effects of board gender diversity, measured in different forms, such as the presence and proportion of female directors, family-affiliated female directors and the chief executive officer (CEO) gender, on CFD in Pakistan. The study also investigates the interacting effects of family-controlled (20 and 50% family-owned) companies on the association between board gender diversity and CFD.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied the pooled cross-sectional logistic regression model to examine the effect of board gender diversity (presence and proportion of female directors, family-affiliated female directors and CEO gender) on CFD through a sample of 285 non-financial companies in Pakistan over the period of 2006–2017.

Findings

The results reveal that gender diversity on boards is significantly and negatively associated with CFD in Pakistan. In addition, when family ownership is 50% or more, the interacting effect of family control is found to be significant, while gender effects remain negative. The results suggest that female directors contribute to the long-term viability of companies, especially family-owned companies. Female directors are also found to be more prevalent in family-owned companies compared to their non-family counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply that female directors may efficiently manage and control all functions necessary to guarantee the company's long-term prosperity. Similarly, gender effects can outweigh the detrimental impact of family control when female directors are in reasonable numbers and of high quality in the boardroom.

Practical implications

The practical relevance of the findings is that female directors play a significant role on the corporate board. Thus, it is a wakeup call for Pakistani companies to recognize the critical role and uniqueness of women on the corporate ladder. Family companies can also galvanize on the uniqueness of women to improve their governance structure.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature on the benefits of gender diversity in family and non-family-owned companies. Specifically, this study applied multiple measures of gender diversity and family control in a single study. In addition, the study was conducted in a country that is ranked as the second worst country in the Global Gender Gap Index 2022, implying that investigating this type of research would go a long way towards changing the minds of corporate executives and regulators about the critical role that women can play in the economy.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15