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Article

Haemi Kim and Hailin Qu

This paper aims to study how the negative spiral of incivility from customers to employees happens by measuring the mediating effect of employees’ burnout. Moreover, it…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study how the negative spiral of incivility from customers to employees happens by measuring the mediating effect of employees’ burnout. Moreover, it investigates how to mitigate the detrimental influences of customer incivility by assessing the moderating effect of employees’ emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional questionnaire survey using MTurk was conducted, targeting full-service restaurant employees. Descriptive statistic, confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analysis were applied.

Findings

The results presented that there is a direct relationship between customer incivility and employee incivility toward customers and coworkers. Additionally, employees’ burnout significantly mediates the relationship between customer incivility and employee incivility. Moreover, it presented the significant moderating effect of employees’ emotional intelligence on the relationship between customer incivility and employee incivility.

Research limitations/implications

Experiences of customer incivility during a service encounter directly trigger employee incivility. Moreover, customer incivility indirectly leads to employee incivility by increasing employees’ burnout. In addition, employees’ emotional intelligence mitigates a negative spiral of incivility from customers to employees. However, this study has limitations that provide suggestions for future research.

Originality/value

This research shows how customer incivility causes employee incivility in the workplace. It also shows a significant moderating role of employees’ emotional intelligence to mitigate the influence of customer incivility on employee incivility.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Haemi Kim, Jinyoung Im, Hailin Qu and Julie NamKoong

This study aims to investigate the conditions required for encouraging employees to engage in job crafting and examine the consequences of job crafting behavior. Job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the conditions required for encouraging employees to engage in job crafting and examine the consequences of job crafting behavior. Job crafting is employees’ proactive behaviors at work associated with modifying tasks, managing social relations and changing job cognition.

Design/methodology/approach

A paper-and-pencil onsite survey was conducted by targeting frontline employees working in five-star hotels located in Seoul, South Korea. Descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used.

Findings

Perceived organizational support triggers employees’ job crafting. Task crafting leads to relational and cognitive crafting. Relational and cognitive crafting increases employees’ fit with the organization, whereas task crafting does not. Employees’ fit with the organization is positively associated with job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Employees’ job crafting has positive consequences for a company by enhancing employees’ fit with the organization, resulting in increased job satisfaction. Thus, organizations need to show how much the organization cares about employees’ values, so that employees can initiate job crafting by utilizing organizational support. However, generalizing the results should be done cautiously.

Originality/value

This study focuses on the effect of an organizational-level predictor, whereas previous job crafting literature has focused mainly on an individual level or on task-related factors. It also empirically tests the causal relationships among the three facets of job crafting and provides their distinctive influences on person-organization fit that ultimately leads to job satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Haemi Kim and Hailin Qu

This study aims to investigate the psychological mechanisms underlying hospitality employees’ social exchange relationships at work by applying the social aspects of work…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the psychological mechanisms underlying hospitality employees’ social exchange relationships at work by applying the social aspects of work and the social exchange theory.

Design/methodology/approach

MTurk was used for conducting a cross-sectional questionnaire survey, targeting frontline employees who were working in full-service restaurants. Descriptive statistic, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were performed.

Findings

Customer-employee exchange had a positive relationship with gratitude. Moreover, gratitude was positively associated with both role-prescribed customer service and extra-role customer service. Leader-member exchange and coworker exchange were positively related to obligation. Obligation had positive association with both role-prescribed customer service and extra-role customer service. The mediating effects of gratitude and obligation were statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

Employees’ social exchange relationship with customers promotes prosocial behaviors by arousing gratitude in them. Moreover, their social exchange relationships with supervisors and coworkers lead to prosocial behaviors by provoking obligation from them.

Originality/value

This research shows the importance of the social aspects of work to contribute to employees’ prosocial behavior in the hospitality industry. Moreover, it proves the critical roles of emotions to guide employees’ decisions about social exchange.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Yanping Yu, Haemi Kim and Hailin Qu

This study aims to develop a measurement scale to assess generation Y China hotel employees’ workplace deviance and then investigate the effect of generation Y employees…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a measurement scale to assess generation Y China hotel employees’ workplace deviance and then investigate the effect of generation Y employees’ deep acting on workplace deviance by focusing on the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion and the moderating effect of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

The study first adopts a mixed-methods approach to develop the scale of generation Y hotel employees’ workplace deviance, then multiple data is collected targeting 580 hotel employees by a three-stage survey. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and a hierarchical regression analysis were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Workplace deviance of generation Y hotel employees in China was divided into two dimensions, aggression and neglect. Deep acting was found to be negatively related to workplace deviance, and emotional exhaustion had a mediating effect on the relationship between deep acting and workplace deviance. Organizational identification strengthened the effect of deep acting on neglect and the effect of deep acting on emotional exhaustion, whereas it did not moderate the relationship between deep acting and aggression.

Originality/value

First, this study provides a more powerful explanatory perspective on the conservation of resources theory to explore future research by especially targeting generation Y employees. Second, this study develops the elements of workplace deviance structure of generation Y hotel employees, especially in the Chinese cultural context. Third, it explores the inherent mechanism of how and why deep acting impacts workplace deviance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Hsin‐Pin Fu, Tien‐Hsiang Chang, Wan‐I Lee and Cheng‐Chin Lu

The purpose of the research is to explore electronic marketplace (EM) strategies adopted by enterprises in free markets and controlled markets. Meanwhile, their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research is to explore electronic marketplace (EM) strategies adopted by enterprises in free markets and controlled markets. Meanwhile, their differences are compared.

Design/methodology/approach

In the research, the EM strategies adopted by enterprises in free markets from the value‐chain perspective are discussed first. Then, in‐depth interviews with enterprises in controlled markets are followed.

Findings

The effect on corporations' marketing effectiveness is rather limited because fewer competitors resulted in little competition and more monopolization in a controlled market. Also, the buyer focuses on product quality without a high awareness of the concept of cost.

Practical implications

The results indicate that there are differences in EM strategies adopted by enterprises in free and controlled markets from the value‐chain perspective.

Originality/value

Faced with the expanding internationalized markets, companies must carefully consider the operational modes and strategies of EMs.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article

H. Young Baek

We theoretically identify two levels of agency conflicts related to foreign direct investment (FDI): within a parent firm and between parent(s) and an affiliated firm. For…

Abstract

We theoretically identify two levels of agency conflicts related to foreign direct investment (FDI): within a parent firm and between parent(s) and an affiliated firm. For a sample of 182 firms that announced U.S.‐related FDIs in 1995, we examine the effects of agency conflicts on the choice between a wholly owned subsidiary (WOS) and a joint venture (JV), and the relative share ownership of a parent. Firms with higher management ownership, especially the firms that made related FDIs, and firms with higher foreign affiliate monitoring efficiency are more likely to choose a WOS. Differences between U.S. and non‐U.S. parents are also examined.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Andrei Novac and Robert G. Bota

How does the human brain absorb information and turn it into skills of its own in psychotherapy? In an attempt to answer this question, the authors will review the…

Abstract

How does the human brain absorb information and turn it into skills of its own in psychotherapy? In an attempt to answer this question, the authors will review the intricacies of processing channels in psychotherapy and propose the term transprocessing (as in transduction and processing combined) for the underlying mechanisms. Through transprocessing the brain processes multimodal memories and creates reparative solutions in the course of psychotherapy. Transprocessing is proposed as a stage-sequenced mechanism of deconstruction of engrained patterns of response. Through psychotherapy, emotional-cognitive reintegration and its consolidation is accomplished. This process is mediated by cellular and neural plasticity changes.

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Article

S. Jahanshaei, T. Tabarsa and J. Asghari

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an eco‐friendly tannin‐phenol formaldehyde resin (PFT) applicable in the wood composite industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an eco‐friendly tannin‐phenol formaldehyde resin (PFT) applicable in the wood composite industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The bark of oak (Quercus castaneifolia) contains a large amount of condensed tannin. Condensed tannin, with a large amount of Catechol groups was considered for reducing the formaldehyde emission level on the adhesive system. Physical characteristics of synthesized PFT resin were evaluated.

Findings

For optimal extraction, three solvents were used in the extraction process. The results showed that a mixture of water‐methanol (1:1 v/v) as extracting solvent is the best solvent and yields about 14 per cent tannin based on dry weight of bark. For producing tannin phenol formaldehyde adhesive, 10 per cent, 20 per cent and 30 per cent (based on PF dry weight) of PF, substituted with natural extracted tannin. For evaluating PFT performance effects of percentage amount of substitution tannin content on the gel time, viscosity, pH, and density of adhesives were evaluated. Based on emission test (JIS A 1460‐2001) formaldehyde emission of PFT 10 per cent, 20 per cent and 30 per cent were 1.13, 1.12 and 0.4 mg/100 g, which is very low compared with tannin‐free PF.

Research limitations/implications

Tannin‐PF adhesive compared to PF adhesive had lower PH, higher viscosity and shorter gel time.

Practical implications

The method developed provides a simple and excellent renewable resource “tannin” which can be used or partially substituted in phenol formaldehyde adhesive.

Originality/value

Results showed that replacing PF for tannin reduces modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) slightly but has significant effects on IB, water absorption and thickness swelling.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Authenticity & Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-817-6

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Article

Apinya Chanthakulchan, Pisut Koomsap, Kampanat Auyson and Pitt Supaphol

– This paper aims to present the development of an electrospinning-based rapid prototyping (ESRP) technique for the fabrication of patterned scaffolds from fine fiber.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the development of an electrospinning-based rapid prototyping (ESRP) technique for the fabrication of patterned scaffolds from fine fiber.

Design/methodology/approach

This ESRP technique unifies rapid prototyping (RP) and electrospinning to obtain the ability of RP to create a controllable pattern and of electrospinning to create a continuous fine fiber. The technique follows RP process of fused deposition modeling, but instead of using extrusion process for fiber creation, electrospinning is applied to generate a continuous fiber from a liquid solution. A machine prototype has been constructed and used in the experiments to evaluate the technique.

Findings

Three different lay-down patterns: 0°/90°, 45°/135° and 45° twists were used in the experiments. According to the experimental results, stacks of patterned layers could be created with the ESRP technique, and the fabrication process was repeatable and reproducible. However, the existing machine vibration influenced the fiber size and the ability to control straightness and gap size. Also, incomplete solidification of the fibers prior to being deposited obstructed the control of layer thickness. Improvement on vibration suppression and fiber solidification will strengthen the capability of this ESRP technique.

Research limitations/implications

This research is currently limited to the introduction of the ESRP technique, to the development of the machine prototype, to the demonstration of its capability and to the evaluation of the structural properties of the fabricated patterned scaffolds. Further studies are required for better control of the patterned scaffolds and for investigation of mechanical and biological properties.

Originality/value

This unification of the two processes allows not only the fabrication of controllable patterned scaffolds but also the fabrication of both woven and non-woven layers of fibers to be done on one machine.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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