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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Hae Jin Gam, Huantian Cao, Jaclyn Bennett, Caroline Helmkamp and Cheryl Farr

Combining of natural and synthetic materials in apparel products caused problems with material recovery, reuse, recycling, or composting at the end of product life. The…

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1529

Abstract

Purpose

Combining of natural and synthetic materials in apparel products caused problems with material recovery, reuse, recycling, or composting at the end of product life. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of design for disassembly methods in the design and construction of men's jacket. With this type of design, consumers and manufacturers can easily compost, recycle, or reuse different materials and components at the end of the garment's usable life.

Design/methodology/approach

After analyzing the men's jackets available in the market and identifying obstacles to disassembly, the authors designed and constructed a man's jacket that can be easily disassembled. The jacket design for disassembly focused on material selection, jacket design, and stitch evaluation and selection. The disassembly time was also measured.

Findings

It was found that minimizing material diversity and sewing similar materials together whenever possible, replacing fusible interfacing with blind hemming stitches under the collar and on the backside of the lapel, and using an appropriate low density stitch to sew the wool outer shell and polyester lining together, can make the jacket disassemble easily into a compostable outer shell and recyclable lining within 1.5 min.

Originality/value

This research provided a pilot study demonstration of applying “design for disassembly” in apparel design and construction. The findings could be employed in different apparel products to help reduce environmental pollution and resource depletion problems related to the apparel industry.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 23 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Hae Jin Gam

Previous studies regard purchasing of environmentally friendly clothing (EFC) as a subset of environmental behavior. However, like all clothing, EFC also reflects a…

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16291

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies regard purchasing of environmentally friendly clothing (EFC) as a subset of environmental behavior. However, like all clothing, EFC also reflects a consumer's fashion choices, and the many variables that influence EFC purchase decisions must be understood for apparel companies to effectively market eco‐friendly products. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify whether fashion and shopping orientation are determinants of EFC purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to examine the effects of fashion orientation, shopping orientation, and environmental concern and eco‐friendly behavior on purchase intention of EFC. A total of 329 usable questionnaires were collected from young female consumers aged 18‐25 years.

Findings

Factor analysis was used to evaluate both independent variables – predictors: fashion orientation, shopping orientation, environmental concern, and eco‐friendly behavior – and the dependent variable – purchase intention regarding EFC. The findings from a series of linear regression analyses indicated that one fashion orientation factor, two shopping orientation factors, and three environmental concern and eco‐friendly behavior factors are significantly related to consumers' purchase intention regarding EFC.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study are limited to young female consumers in the midwestern USA.

Practical implications

This study suggests that the apparel industry should provide an enjoyable retail environment to attract young EFC consumers.

Originality/value

Fashion and shopping orientation have not been utilized to explain consumers' purchase intention regarding EFC. This study suggests some effective marketing approaches to apparel companies, as well as strategies for developing successful sustainable apparel products that consumers will purchase.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Hae Jin Gam, Huantian Cao, Cheryl Farr and Lauren Heine

The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement a new sustainable apparel design and production model, cradle to cradle apparel design (C2CAD), that provides…

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4459

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement a new sustainable apparel design and production model, cradle to cradle apparel design (C2CAD), that provides guidelines for apparel designers and manufacturers to solve some of the sustainability problems related to apparel production.

Design/methodology/approach

The C2CAD model was developed by integrating McDonough and Braungart's “cradle to cradle” model into existing apparel design and production models. Knitwear design and production was used to implement the C2CAD model as a proof of concept. The performance and cost of the C2CAD knitwear were evaluated.

Findings

The C2CAD model has four main steps: problem definition and research; sample making; solution development and collaboration; and production. Following the four steps and with an international collaboration similar to current apparel industry practices, “Four‐season sustainability” children's knitwear prototypes were developed. Produced with an acceptable manufacturing cost, the products have good mechanical and color fastness performance.

Practical implications

The C2CAD model provides practical guidelines for apparel designers and manufacturers and allows them to address all three pillars in sustainable development: economic development, social development, and environmental protection.

Originality/value

The C2CAD is the first apparel design and production model that emphasizes sustainability in addition to functional, expressive, and aesthetic considerations. The production process of “Four‐season sustainability” children's knitwear demonstrated the implementation of C2CAD model in sustainable apparel design and production.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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