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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Tianchang Zhai, Wenjin Long and Wei Si

The purpose of this study is to explain the rapid growth of urban residents' sugar consumption in China from the perspective of habit formation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explain the rapid growth of urban residents' sugar consumption in China from the perspective of habit formation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the provincial panel data of Chinese urban households from 1995 to 2012, this study uses the two-step System Generalized Moment Method (GMM) to test the habit formation effect on residents' sugar expenditure in urban China. We also use system GMM and the recursive estimated method to explore the changes of the habit formation coefficients in different years.

Findings

We find a significant habit formation effect on overall residents' sugar expenditure and different types of sugary foods expenditure. The habit formation effect on total residents' sugar expenditure and different types of sugary foods is decreasing over the years. The patterns of the changes of the habit formation effect on different types of sugar foods are slightly different.

Research limitations/implications

Due to data limitations, we are not able to do household-level analysis and to examine the heterogeneity of the habit formation effect.

Originality/value

This is the first study that examines changes in the habit formation effect on residents' sugar expenditure in urban China. Our findings provide a reasonable explanation for the rapid growth of residents' sugar consumption in urban China. The result helps to formulate targeted policies for future interventions to control the growth of sugar consumption.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Mengjun Li and Ayoung Suh

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a theoretical model that accounts for an individual's we-intention to continue playing a mobile multiplayer game.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a theoretical model that accounts for an individual's we-intention to continue playing a mobile multiplayer game.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on habit-intention and habit formation theories, this study conceptualizes social play habit as a determinant of the we-intention to continue playing and identifies its antecedents. The proposed model was tested through a survey of 277 players of Honor of Kings, a popular mobile multiplayer game.

Findings

The results indicate that developing social play habit is critical to the formation of a we-intention to continue playing in the context of mobile multiplayer games. The results also suggest that technological (social features embedded in the game) and individual (desire for co-play and privacy concerns) factors jointly influence social play habit.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature on we-intention by conceptualizing social play habit and verifying its role in facilitating a shared intention to continue playing mobile multiplayer games. Our work responds to the call for understanding the mechanism by which multiple people form a shared intention to continue using an information technology at a collective level. Our findings provide significant insights into the design of information technologies for collaboration.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to extend the literature on gaming habits by considering other players' involvement. Specifically, our study shifts researchers' attention from gaming habits characterized by individual properties to social gaming habits characterized by communal properties.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Yonathan Dri Handarkho, Yulius Harjoseputro, Joseph Eric Samodra and Aloysius Bagas Pradipta Irianto

This study aims to propose a theoretical model to explain mobile payment (MP) continuance usage in a physical store in Indonesia from a habit perspective. In detail…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a theoretical model to explain mobile payment (MP) continuance usage in a physical store in Indonesia from a habit perspective. In detail, continuance usage was argued to be a consequence of habitual behavior which is related to specific actions conducted automatically, repeatedly and frequently. Therefore, the theoretical model was constructed on the theory of habit establishment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 220 Indonesian respondents were used to examine the theoretical model. Furthermore, a cross-sectional study was used through the use of a descriptive statistical approach to preparing data and descriptive analyses and structural equation modeling method for analysis.

Findings

Satisfaction was found to have the most substantial direct influence on the establishment of habit to use MP followed by perceived usefulness and perceived compatibility. Meanwhile, deal proneness and social ties were discovered to have a significant indirect effect on habit through the mediation of usefulness.

Originality/value

This study used the theory of habit formation to understand how user develops repeated behavior in MP usage which leads to continuance usage of the platform. There is limited explicit exploration and development of a theory based on this concept, therefore, this study is a contribution to the body of knowledge with respect to habit formation and its impacts on MP continuance usage.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Joseph G. Eisenhauer

This paper simplifies and extends the literature on habit‐forming consumption. When addictive and nonaddictive goods are consumed, complements may become substitutes and…

Abstract

This paper simplifies and extends the literature on habit‐forming consumption. When addictive and nonaddictive goods are consumed, complements may become substitutes and normal nonaddictive goods may become inferior. Alternatively, when all goods are equally addictive, consumers favor goods with stable prices. Implications for product promotion and public policy are discussed.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Jialin Snow Wu, Shun Ye, Chen Jerry Zheng and Rob Law

To better understand how to retain hospitality customers in the fierce competition among mobile applications, this study aims to propose and empirically validates an…

Abstract

Purpose

To better understand how to retain hospitality customers in the fierce competition among mobile applications, this study aims to propose and empirically validates an integrative framework, which elaborates how conscious and subconscious factors, together with affective factors, may induce app loyalty and how brand viscosity moderates such effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an online survey to collect data and received a total of 268 valid responses. This study splits the data into two groups (brand viscosity vs non-viscosity). Then, the authors performed a multi-group structural equation modeling with Chi-square difference tests to compare the model between the two groups.

Findings

The findings support the integrative model and reveal that the influence of app satisfaction on loyalty is stronger for app users who do not stick to one brand across the website and mobile app channels. Moreover, for those with brand viscosity, habit and switching cost are two significant determinants that exert positive effects in inducing app loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

Brand viscosity across different channels matters for the effects of habit and switching costs in shaping app loyalty. E-commerce managers should elaborate on brand management among various booking channels and establish effective digital marketing strategies to facilitate the formation of usage habits and switching costs and to enhance brand viscosity across channels.

Originality/value

This research advances the knowledge of app loyalty in hospitality by providing a comprehensive explanatory framework from affective, conscious and subconscious lenses. This research is among the first to unveil the impact of brand viscosity on the links between loyalty and its determinants.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Svein Ottar Olsen, Ana Alina Tudoran, Karen Brunsø and Wim Verbeke

This study aims to address the role of habit strength in explaining loyalty behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the role of habit strength in explaining loyalty behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses 2,063 consumers' data from a survey in Denmark and Spain, and multigroup structural equation modelling to analyse the data. The paper describes an approach employing the psychological meanings of the habit construct, such as automaticity, lack of awareness or very little conscious deliberation.

Findings

The findings suggest that when habits start to develop and gain strength, less planning is involved, and that the loyalty behaviour sequence mainly occurs guided by automaticity and inertia. A new model with habit strength as a mediator between satisfaction and loyalty behaviour provides a substantial increase in explained variance in loyalty behaviour over the traditional model with intention as a mediator.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existent literature by providing an extension of the prevalent consumer loyalty theorizing by integrating the concept of habit strength and by generating new knowledge concerning the conscious/strategic and unconscious/automatic nature of consumer loyalty. The study derives managerial implications on how to facilitate habit formation and how to influence habit‐based versus intention‐based loyalty behaviour. The external validity of this study is assured by nationwide representative samples in two countries.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Chongyang Chen, Kem Z.K. Zhang, Xiang Gong and Matthew Lee

In the limited existing research on smartphone addiction, reinforcement reward and automatic habit have been identified as two distinct underlying mechanisms. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

In the limited existing research on smartphone addiction, reinforcement reward and automatic habit have been identified as two distinct underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the interaction between these two mechanisms, as well as role of smartphone features in activating different formation mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey with 379 samples was conducted to empirically validate the model. The data were analyzed by structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The automatic habit strengthens the driving effects of reinforcement rewards (i.e. perceived enjoyment and mood regulation) on smartphone addiction. Smartphone features activate distinct underlying mechanisms. Value-added function facilitates the perception of reinforcement rewards, while convenience promotes the habit formation.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first ones that assess the interplay between the two formation mechanisms in the extant literature on smartphone addiction. This study also reveals the dangers of smartphone features which have always been regarded as advantages. The findings contribute to the current understandings of smartphone addiction.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kristijian Mirkovski, Yanli Jia, Libo Liu and Kun Chen

The purpose of this paper is to explain how individuals form microblogging habits and why they continue to use microblogs from the perspective of direction social networks.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how individuals form microblogging habits and why they continue to use microblogs from the perspective of direction social networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the social network theory and the social presence theory, the authors develop a theoretical framework to explain how individuals form microblogging habits and why they continue to use microblogs. To test the proposed model and examine its external validity, the authors collected data from two microblogs: Twitter and Sina Weibo.

Findings

Satisfaction and habit have a significant influence on microblogging continuance intention. Whereas, users’ microblogging habits are developed by two key factors – satisfaction and frequency of past behavior – that are further determined by social presence and social network centrality.

Research limitations/implications

Larger sample size with diverse populations is highly recommended for future studies. In addition, exploring the distinct technical functionalities of microblogs when conceptualizing habit formation would be of benefit in future studies.

Practical implications

In this study, it was found that social presence increases both the satisfaction of users and the frequency of past use behavior. Hence, microblog designers should provide users with greater freedom to modify the form and content of their interface, and enable these modifications to be visible in real time to increase the interactivity of microblogs.

Originality/value

In contrast to past studies that have largely neglected the impacts of the directed social network structure, this study aims to focus on microblogging continuance intention from the directed social network perspective. The results from two independent data sets converge on the conclusion that users’ continuance intention to use is affected by both their conscious evaluations (i.e. satisfaction) and unconscious reactions (i.e. habit).

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Allison Earl, Robert VanWynsberghe, Pierre Walter and Timothy Straka

This paper aims to present an interpretive case study in education for sustainability (EfS) that applies VanWynsberghe and Herman’s (2015, 2016) adaptive education as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an interpretive case study in education for sustainability (EfS) that applies VanWynsberghe and Herman’s (2015, 2016) adaptive education as pedagogy. Dewey’s theory of behaviour change is applied to educative experiences based on habit disruption and real-world learning, leading to creativity in the formation of new habits. The programme presented inverts dominant conceptions of knowledge to design innovative sustainability pedagogy. Instead knowledge resides alongside experience, cases, intuition, advice, experimentation and dialogue in the individual and collective effort to address daily sustainability challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on the outcomes of an interpretive case study (Merriam, 1998) of a higher education programme in sustainability pedagogy. It presents a series of reflections by instructors and participants in discussing the programme’s relationship with the core themes of habit, disruption, creative action and dialogue framed within the five features of adaptive education: stakeholders, real-world learning, off campus, transdisciplinarity and non-traditional rewards.

Findings

Through this examination, the authors found that adaptive education offered a pedagogy that simultaneously addressed the need for increased sustainability knowledge, whilst inverting its dominance. As a long-term project, the extent of the programme’s impact will be evident beyond the programme’s completion.

Research limitations/implications

This interpretive case study is analysed through high-level conceptual and theoretical aspects of the pedagogy rather than the particularities of the case. By putting the centrality of knowledge into question, the authors are advocating for a more experimental role for higher education in its teaching and learning. These questions are broadly applicable.

Social implications

There are research, learning and social benefits to this programme. Adaptive education builds capacity for future leaders and educators of sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper concludes with a discussion for further theorizing and research on adaptive education and EfS in higher education. This research will contribute to broader discussions of the evolving role of education in sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Geoffrey M. Hodgson

In much of philosophy and social theory since classical antiquity, human belief and reason have been placed in the driving seat of individual action. In particular, social…

Abstract

In much of philosophy and social theory since classical antiquity, human belief and reason have been placed in the driving seat of individual action. In particular, social theory has often taken it for granted, or even by definition, that action is motivated by reasons based on beliefs. In contrast, a minority has criticized the adoption of this ‘folk psychology’ that explains human action wholly in such ‘mind first’ terms. Critics point out that such explanations are a mere gloss on a much more complex neurophysiological reality. These dualistic and ‘mind-first’ explanations of human behavior are unable to explain adequately such phenomena as sleep, memory, learning, mental illness, or the effects of chemicals or drugs on our perceptions or actions (Bunge, 1980; Churchland, 1984, 1989; Churchland, 1986; Rosenberg, 1995, 1998; Kilpinen, 2000).

Details

Cognition and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-465-2

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