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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Steffen Raub, Lorena Alvarez and Rahul Khanna

The purpose of this research is to analyze differences between the roles of HR managers at the corporate and unit level in the specific context of the hospitality industry.

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5761

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyze differences between the roles of HR managers at the corporate and unit level in the specific context of the hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews with 12 HR managers in three countries, complemented by a short questionnaire, yielded quantitative data on Ulrich's HR roles, work time spent in various roles and various degrees of involvement in decision making. Respondents also provided qualitative accounts of their roles.

Findings

Distinct differences exist between HR work at the corporate and unit level. Whereas unit level managers tend to focus on their role as “administrative experts” and “employee champions”, corporate level managers stressed their role as “strategic partners” and “change agents”. Corporate level managers benefit from earlier involvement in organizational decisions than those at unit level.

Research limitations/implications

A comparatively small convenience sample of 12 HR managers was used. This limitation is mitigated, however, by the inclusion of managers from three different countries and a good balance of corporate and unit level managers in the sample.

Practical implications

The research provides clear evidence of a lack of strategic HR orientation at both the unit and the corporate levels. These results should help corporate decision‐makers rethink and reorient the activities of HRM in their organizations and strengthen its role in organizational decision making.

Originality/value

Despite the popularity of the Ulrich model, there is hardly any empirical research on differences in HR management across organizational levels. The present study explores this topic with a particular focus on the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Nancy Papalexandris and Leda Panayotopoulou

This article seeks to discuss the role that line managers take up concerning human resource management issues among Greek firms and to propose ways for enhancing the…

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4551

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to discuss the role that line managers take up concerning human resource management issues among Greek firms and to propose ways for enhancing the synergistic relationship between human resource (HR) and line managers.

Design/methodology/approach

It presents the trends of line management involvement in Greek firms, from 1993‐2003, based on the CRANET survey. The survey results are enhanced by qualitative data from focus groups.

Findings

Findings show that during the past ten years there has been an increasing tendency for collaboration, with the main responsibility increasingly falling on the HR department. Moreover, the main obstacles to this collaboration are presented.

Research limitations/implications

The main research limitation is the limited data that the CRANET questionnaire provides on the issue of HR – line management partnership. However, the focus groups enrich the survey data with qualitative results. Implications for practice derive from the qualitative results.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is mainly to line managers that are involved in human resource management activities, since the difficulties that occur from this partnership are discussed.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of the under-researched developing country of Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper qualitatively explores the Thai education and skill-formation system and conducts a cross-case analysis of four firms across different industries in Thailand. The empirical findings in this paper draws on semi-structured interviews with various stakeholders; field visits to vocational colleges, universities, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) and firms across industries both in Bangkok and in other provinces in Thailand; and a review of archival documents and web-based reports and resources.

Findings

This paper proposes that firms across industries in Thailand must be responsible for helping their employees/workers obtain the green knowledge and skills necessary to perform green jobs through high-road human resource (HR) practices in response to the fact that the Thai education and skill-formation system is unlikely to produce a sufficient number of employees/workers who have green knowledge, skills and abilities and are industry-ready to perform green jobs, leading to a shortage of employees/workers who possess green skills in the labor market. Specifically, curricula in vocational colleges and universities in Thailand are not likely to respond to the needs of firms in producing those employees/workers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research concern its methodology. This research is based on the qualitative studies of the Thai education and skill-formation system and a case study of firms across industries in Thailand. Thus, this paper does not aim to generalize the findings to all other countries but to enrich the discussion on the effects of macro-level HR policies on the creation of green jobs and the development of green skills across firms in each country. Additionally, it is difficult to gain access to firms across several industries and various stakeholders to understand the development of green skills among employees in these firms. The reasons are resource constraints, time constraints and the hesitation of firms in permitting the author to access the data. These difficulties have restricted the sources of information to construct a more nuanced picture of firms across various industries in developing green skills among their existing employees. Consequently, this research does not include firms in several other industries, including the pulp and paper industry, textile and garment industry, plastic industry and agri-food industry. Thus, future research may extend the topic of the development of green skills among employees to these industries. Quantitative studies using large samples of firms across industries may also be useful in deepening the understanding of this topic, which is significant from the perspectives of the strategic human resource management (SHRM), comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and green economy.

Practical implications

This paper also provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand, other developing countries and other emerging market economies with deficiencies in the national education and skill-formation system. First, the top managers and/or HR managers can apply various methods to internally develop managers and employees/workers with the appropriate environmental/green knowledge and necessary skills to perform green jobs. The methods include classroom training, on-the-job training, coaching, mentoring systems, job shadowing and being role models for younger generations of employees. Second, these top managers and/or HR managers can cooperate with vocational colleges and/or universities in their countries to design educational programs/curricula related to environmental/green management to be able to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for their firms. These managers can request for assistance from universities in their countries when their firms confront sophisticated questions/problems related to environmental/green management. In this regard, universities will have an opportunity to solve real environmental/green problems experienced by industries, while firms can appropriately and accurately solve environmental/green questions/problems. Third, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their firms to apply for certificates of green-/environmentally friendly products or carbon footprint labels from NGOs to foster a green image among firms' consumers. These applications require the firms to pay special attention to the cultivation of green awareness and the development of green skills among their employees. Fourth, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their employees to express green-/environmentally friendly behaviors as well as sufficiency-based consumption behaviors. In fact, these top managers and/or HR managers can foster their employees to reduce energy consumption, including electricity and water, to conserve these types of energy for young generations. Fifth, these top managers and/or HR managers can adopt and implement green human resource management (GHRM) practices consisting of green recruitment and selection, green training and development, green performance management, green pay and rewards and green employee relations in their firms to upgrade both the environmental and social performances of firms. Finally, these top managers and/or HR managers must take serious actions regarding the implementation of environmental/green management policies and practices within their firms in order to facilitate the movement of the country toward the bioeconomy, circular economy, and green economy (BCG economy).

Social implications

This paper provides social/policy implications for the government, vocational colleges and universities in Thailand, other developing countries and emerging market economies where the skill shortage problem is still severe. First, the government of each country should incorporate green/environmental policies into the national education policy and the long-term strategic plan of the country. Second, the government should continuously implement such national policy and strategic plan by encouraging government agencies, vocational colleges, universities, firms and NGOs to cooperate in developing and offering environmental/green management educational programs/curricula to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for those firms. Third, the government should encourage vocational colleges and universities to equip their students with green skills to be industry-ready in a real working context. Fourth, to alleviate the skill shortage problem in the labor market, the government should foster firms, especially private sector firms, to focus on the upskilling and reskilling of their existing employees. With this action, their existing employees will have green skills, be able to effectively perform green jobs and become an important driver to help the country move toward the BCG economy. Fifth, the government of each country should encourage firms to develop green-/environmentally friendly products by offering them various types of incentives, including tax reductions or tax exemptions. Sixth, the government should encourage universities in the country to sign a memorandum of understanding with leading research institutes and world-class digital technology companies such that these institutes and/or companies admit high-potential university students to work as trainees/entry-level employees for a certain duration. This action can ultimately facilitate knowledge transfer from these institutes and/or companies to those university students who will finally return to work in their home country. Seventh, the government, especially the Ministry of Education, should encourage vocational colleges and universities to teach students in the environmental/green management program based on real case studies/problems found across firms. In this way, graduates should be industry-ready to perform green jobs. Finally, the government must pay serious attention to the implementation of environmental/green management policies across levels within the country so that the transition of the country toward the BCG economy will finally come true in the future.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the SHRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and the literature on the green economy and the development of green skills in firms in the following ways. First, this paper focuses on examining how the institutional context of Thailand shapes the development of green knowledge and skills among employees across firms in Thailand. In this regard, the paper aims to fill the gap in the literature on strategic HRM and comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices as proposed by Batt and Banerjee (2012) and Batt and Hermans (2012), who suggested that the literature on strategic HRM should go beyond the organizational context and examine how firms adopt and implement HR practices in response to the national institutional context. Second, the paper aims to extend the literature on the green economy regarding the roles played by institutional factors in shaping the development of green knowledge and skills across firms. Finally, strategic HRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices and green economy studies have overlooked the under-researched country of Thailand. Most studies in these three areas focus more on developed countries. Thus, the findings of this paper should extend the literature on those areas regarding the development of green skills among employees across firms in response to the Thai institutional context.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Daniela Isari, Rita Bissola and Barbara Imperatori

Despite much rhetoric about the need to be strategic, HR professionals have often had difficulty in establishing themselves as credible contributors to organizational…

Abstract

Despite much rhetoric about the need to be strategic, HR professionals have often had difficulty in establishing themselves as credible contributors to organizational performances, facing a legitimacy issue in their relationship with line managers. Adopting a social cognitive theory framework, the present study explores the HR professionals’ perceptions and expectations of the changing roles that HR professionals and line managers could play in a near future scenario where a set of smart technologies will be applied to HRM.

The research design is based on a two-wave survey: it involves 53 HR professionals belonging to the HR department of the Italian branch of one of the biggest international consulting companies which is about to implement a wide digital transformation.

Preliminary findings prompt reflections into the role of digital practices in reshaping the relationship between the HR department and line managers, especially in consideration of the role of HR professionals’ technology readiness and tenure. They suggest that HR devolution is not a matter of “all or nothing,” but it requires different solutions, which also depend on the nature of the specific HR practice. From a managerial perspective, the chapter suggests the paramount importance of sustaining the digital mindset of the HR professionals and their professional image.

Details

HRM 4.0 For Human-Centered Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-535-2

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2005

Forrest Briscoe, James Maxwell and Peter Temin

The past two decades have witnessed a transformation in the corporate human resource (HR) function – moving away from a role of balancing multiple interests toward a…

Abstract

The past two decades have witnessed a transformation in the corporate human resource (HR) function – moving away from a role of balancing multiple interests toward a narrower focus on business objectives – yet we know little about how this change occurred. This study finds that the functional backgrounds of senior HR managers played an important role in determining the changing health benefits of large corporations. Managers with finance backgrounds controlled costs more than those with traditional HR backgrounds and contracted with fewer health plans – yet surprisingly without measured differences in health care quality management. These results suggest that more attention should be paid to the backgrounds of managers in the wider evolution of HR.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-265-8

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper aims to examine the design and implementation of age-related human resource (HR) practices across organizations located in the institutional contexts of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the design and implementation of age-related human resource (HR) practices across organizations located in the institutional contexts of the under-researched emerging market economy of Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-case analysis of five organizations is conducted across industries. The empirical evidence in this paper draws on semistructured interviews and focus groups with older workers of each organization, semistructured interviews with top managers and/or HR managers of each organization, field visits to each organization located in Bangkok and other provinces in Thailand and a review of archival documents and Web-based resources.

Findings

This paper proposes that firms design and implement various age-related HR practices, including the extension of the retirement age, financial planning facilitation, the bundling of maintenance and the bundling of utilization, to ensure that older workers in their firms maintain their current level of functioning to cope with the problem of skill shortage in the Thai labor market, have sufficient savings after retirement to respond to the “productivist informal security” welfare state regime and return to previous levels of functioning after facing losses in their careers.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the fact that this research is based on case studies of age-related HR practices in five firms across industries in Thailand, the findings may not be generalizable to all other firms across countries. Rather, the aim of this paper is to enrich the discussion regarding the design and implementation of age-related HR practices in organizations. Another limitation of this research is that it does not include firms located in several industries, such as the financial services industry and the education industry. Future research may explore age-related HR practices in organizations located in these industries. Moreover, quantitative studies using large samples of firms across industries might also be useful for fostering an in-depth understanding of the design and implementation of age-related HR practices in organizations.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand and other emerging market economies. That said, these top managers and/or HR managers can implement age-related HR practices to respond to the problem of skill shortage in the labor market, ensure that older workers have sufficient savings after retirement and help older workers return to previous levels of functioning after facing deterioration in health conditions and/or losses in their careers.

Social implications

This paper provides policy implications for the government and/or relevant public agencies of Thailand and other emerging market economies that still face a severe skill shortage problem. Older workers who possess tacit knowledge and valuable experience and are still healthy can be considered excellent alternates for firms to help alleviate the skill shortage problem in the labor market. However, firms should implement age-related HR practices to retain this group of employees overtime.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on comparative institutionalism and human resource management, specifically regarding age-related HR practices, in the following ways. First, this paper examines how firms design and implement age-related HR practices to respond to the country’s macro-level institutions. Additionally, in this paper, the author triangulates the findings from older workers with those from employers to ensure that actual HR practices perceived by older workers are in line with HR practices perceived by top managers and/or HR managers. Moreover, the literature on age-related HR practices has likely overlooked emerging market economies, including the under-researched country of Thailand, because most studies in this area have focused on developed economies. Therefore, the findings in this paper provide an in-depth analysis of the design and implementation of age-related HR practices across firms located in the emerging market economy of Thailand to respond to the national institutional context.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Safa Riaz, Keith Townsend and Peter Woods

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of HRM philosophy for HPWS formulation and implementation, as well as to investigate its role to improve employee…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of HRM philosophy for HPWS formulation and implementation, as well as to investigate its role to improve employee perceptions of HPWS.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of 55 interviews was conducted with managers (senior, HR, frontline) and employees from three telecommunication organisations based in Pakistan.

Findings

The findings indicate that a clear, well-developed HRM philosophy ensures clarity in HPWS formulation not only for managers, but also for employees. However, lack of strong philosophical foundations for HPWS can result into distorted HRM messages and negative employee perceptions.

Originality/value

Whilst there remains debate over the positive and negative influence of HPWS for employee outcomes, this study presents HRM philosophy as important HRM component to understand HPWS implementation. The article highlights the fact that the purpose of HPWS practices and its effective communication to employees can make a substantial difference in how employees perceive these practices. In sum, an employee centred philosophy is likely to be pre-condition circumstances for improving employee outcomes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Rajasshrie Pillai and Brijesh Sivathanu

Human resource managers are adopting AI technology for conducting various tasks of human resource management, starting from manpower planning till employee exit. AI…

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3082

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource managers are adopting AI technology for conducting various tasks of human resource management, starting from manpower planning till employee exit. AI technology is prominently used for talent acquisition in organizations. This research investigates the adoption of AI technology for talent acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) and Task-Technology-Fit (TTF) framework and proposes a model to explore the adoption of AI technology for talent acquisition. The survey was conducted among the 562 human resource managers and talent acquisition managers with a structured questionnaire. The analysis of data was completed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

This research reveals that cost-effectiveness, relative advantage, top management support, HR readiness, competitive pressure and support from AI vendors positively affect AI technology adoption for talent acquisition. Security and privacy issues negatively influence the adoption of AI technology. It is found that task and technology characteristics influence the task technology fit of AI technology for talent acquisition. Adoption and task technology fit of AI technology influence the actual usage of AI technology for talent acquisition. It is revealed that stickiness to traditional talent acquisition methods negatively moderates the association between adoption and actual usage of AI technology for talent acquisition. The proposed model was empirically validated and revealed the predictors of adoption and actual usage of AI technology for talent acquisition.

Practical implications

This paper provides the predictors of the adoption of AI technology for talent acquisition, which is emerging extensively in the human resource domain. It provides vital insights to the human resource managers to benchmark AI technology required for talent acquisition. Marketers can develop their marketing plan considering the factors of adoption. It would help designers to understand the factors of adoption and design the AI technology algorithms and applications for talent acquisition. It contributes to advance the literature of technology adoption by interweaving it with the human resource domain literature on talent acquisition.

Originality/value

This research uniquely validates the model for the adoption of AI technology for talent acquisition using the TOE and TTF framework. It reveals the factors influencing the adoption and actual usage of AI technology for talent acquisition.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Ali Najeeb

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of human resource (HR) actors in the design and implementation of HR practices. More specifically, the paper explores…

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5471

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of human resource (HR) actors in the design and implementation of HR practices. More specifically, the paper explores how interactions between various HR actors influence the design and implementation of HR practices in tourist resorts in the Maldives.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, multiple case study approach was used. Data for this study were collected in seven tourist resorts in the Maldives through 49 semi-structured interviews conducted with managers with different functional roles, at various levels in the organisational hierarchy and with non-managerial employees. Field observations and a range of secondary sources supplemented the interview data.

Findings

The findings show that all HR actors influence the design and implementation of human resource management (HRM) practices in these resorts to some degree, although the extent of their involvement varies from actor to actor. Execution of HR practices necessitates interaction among HR actors as they contest and reconcile their interests and roles. High levels of social capital enhance the roles of HR actors as they overcome constraints to the implementation of HRM practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a qualitative and exploratory study. Data are clustered at the sub-unit level and limited to a single industry. This presents limitations in generalising the findings. A more extensive study covering other industries is necessary to explore different configurations of the negotiated relationships among HR actors.

Practical implications

This study identifies various management strategies that could be used to enhance HR actors’ social capital. These strategies could be useful for managers in other organisational settings

Originality/value

There is a dearth of literature on the interactions between managers at different levels in organisational hierarchies and with different functional roles, and how these interactions affect the design and implementation of HRM practices in organisations. Using social capital theory, this research explores the interaction between HR actors in the design and implementation of HRM in the context of self-contained resorts in the Maldives, thereby shedding light on a context that has attracted little research to date.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Douglas Renwick

States that in respect of organizations’ attempts to devolve operational HR management to line managers, and the reconfiguration of HR work in general, one area of HR work…

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4310

Abstract

States that in respect of organizations’ attempts to devolve operational HR management to line managers, and the reconfiguration of HR work in general, one area of HR work that has received relatively little attention is the state of work relations between HR and line managers involved in the operation and execution of HR policy. Any research that has been done has often been a‐theoretical. Reviews the literature in the field and examines the themes raised by means of an exploratory pilot case study. The case findings are that conflictual relations are seen to exist, but are seen to be negated by moves towards more consensual relations by both parties. Concludes that it is useful to seek to derive a wider research agenda than that which presently exists for HR‐line work relations (especially the need for further case work), and to stress the need for further theory development in the field, so as to examine consensual theories’ explanations of why such developments are occurring.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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