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HORACE THOROGOOD

MOST journalists are the products of books, and chiefly of these books, I reflected as I stood in front of that section of the London Press Club's library devoted to the…

Abstract

MOST journalists are the products of books, and chiefly of these books, I reflected as I stood in front of that section of the London Press Club's library devoted to the English language classics. Other shelves were filled with reference books, directories, dictionaries, encyclopaedias, topical histories, and commentaries — the daily fodder of the journalist, where (one might say) he parks his memory: but these were the books that set him on the way he has come. Here were the poets, and the big fellows of prose—Johnson, Scott, Dickens, Swift, Thackeray, Stevenson, Hardy—the whole illustrious troop.

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Library Review, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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HORACE THOROGOOD

Since nearly everyone reads books, it follows that they must have a wide influence on public opinion calling, one would think, for close critical attention by the…

Abstract

Since nearly everyone reads books, it follows that they must have a wide influence on public opinion calling, one would think, for close critical attention by the newspapers. For books are news: not only informative books that extend knowledge; but novels that diffuse fresh ideas destined, perhaps, to create important social changes—they, too, are news.

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Library Review, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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HORACE THOROGOOD

Visiting the libraries of the British Commonwealth offices in London, as I have been doing—going from Australia to Canada, then to South Africa and India—is an impressive…

Abstract

Visiting the libraries of the British Commonwealth offices in London, as I have been doing—going from Australia to Canada, then to South Africa and India—is an impressive reminder of the magnitude of what used to be known as the British Empire, and of the power which it still exerts over the mind and spirit of mankind. Four continents are represented, and the libraries show how each has been impregnated with the ideals emanating from this small island in the fifth. Asia, Africa, Australia, America—the progress of civilisation in all has been directed or guided in large measure by British influence. The British Empire as a political fact has ceased to be, but Britain still reigns over an ideological empire, worldwide and imperishable.

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Library Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

HORACE THOROGOOD

When the late Lord Norwich entitled his last book, Old Men Forget he was, unfortunately, mistaken. Old men remember too much too readily, and what they remember is apt to…

Abstract

When the late Lord Norwich entitled his last book, Old Men Forget he was, unfortunately, mistaken. Old men remember too much too readily, and what they remember is apt to have a false glamour upon it. If Kipling had written another “If—,” this time for their benefit, he would probably have told them that IF they could recall the days when they were young without using them to disparage the present times, THEN they would avoid being the pain in the neck which most garrulous old gentlemen are.

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Library Review, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

HORACE THOROGOOD

The newspaper office library is quite unlike any other kind of library. It doesn't look like a library, it doesn't feel like one, it doesn't even smell like one. Books…

Abstract

The newspaper office library is quite unlike any other kind of library. It doesn't look like a library, it doesn't feel like one, it doesn't even smell like one. Books occupy a comparatively small space. A visiting librarian from a public library might well think he had been taken to the wrong place.

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Library Review, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

HORACE THOROGOOD

In an earlier article contributed to the issue of Winter, 1951, the libraries described were all in men's clubs. In the Forum, I came to a different atmosphere. Here…

Abstract

In an earlier article contributed to the issue of Winter, 1951, the libraries described were all in men's clubs. In the Forum, I came to a different atmosphere. Here, women ruled and grace abounded. Since the Lyceum Club closed in 1919, the Forum has been London's premier ladies' club. Princess Marie Louise is its President, and its list of officers bristles with Dames and letters of distinction.

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Library Review, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

HORACE THOROGOOD

Each of these London West End clubs whose libraries I have been visiting is an association of men with interests of a special kind, mainly political, professional or…

Abstract

Each of these London West End clubs whose libraries I have been visiting is an association of men with interests of a special kind, mainly political, professional or artistic. The libraries, therefore, have this peculiar interest: they reflect the more serious tastes and avocations of the upper crust of London society. Most possess literary treasures or curiosities not, or rarely, to be found elsewhere. The difference between them and other libraries might be likened to the difference between a public park and a private garden. They are very personal.

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Library Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

HORACE THOROGOOD

Most of us who are bookmen have some particular book weighing on our conscience, one of those important books that, for some reason, we missed reading when young and that…

Abstract

Most of us who are bookmen have some particular book weighing on our conscience, one of those important books that, for some reason, we missed reading when young and that haunts us now when we have no longer the leisure, nor perhaps the inclination, for it. One day, we promise ourselves, we will make time to read it. But seldom does that day come.

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Library Review, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

HORACE THOROGOOD

“We are really a family concern,” said Mr. John Carter, referring to Routledge & Kegan Paul of which he is chairman; and the same, in different degrees, could be said of…

Abstract

“We are really a family concern,” said Mr. John Carter, referring to Routledge & Kegan Paul of which he is chairman; and the same, in different degrees, could be said of the three other London publishing houses which I have been visiting. Longmans and Murrays are eminent examples.

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Library Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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For me the earliest number of The Library Assistant still has upon it the silver glow which in middle age belongs to remembered dreams. To our Bournemouth Library in 1898…

Abstract

For me the earliest number of The Library Assistant still has upon it the silver glow which in middle age belongs to remembered dreams. To our Bournemouth Library in 1898 the modest bantling came, its pale blue cover crowded with advertisements, on the front of binder and bookseller; of the Cotgreave indicator and magazine racks on the back. A simply‐printed affair of twelve pages, as unpretentious as a country‐town bulletin, but a veritable window into life for many, however, and, in my sober judgment, a chief influence in the making of the library spirit of to‐day.

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Library Review, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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