Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Tengiz Verulava, Revaz Jorbenadze, Ana Lordkipanidze, Ana Gongadze, Michael Tsverava and Manana Donjashvili

Heart Failure (HF) is one of the leading mortality causes in elderly people. The purpose of this study is to assess readmission rates and reasons in elderly patients with HF.

Abstract

Purpose

Heart Failure (HF) is one of the leading mortality causes in elderly people. The purpose of this study is to assess readmission rates and reasons in elderly patients with HF.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors explored medical records of elderly patients with HF (75 years and more) at Chapidze Emergency Cardiology Center (Georgia) from 2015 to 2019. The authors analyzed the structure of the cardiovascular diseases and readmission rates of hospitalized patients with HF (I50, I50.0 I50.1). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors, associated with readmission for any reason during 6–9 months after the initial hospitalization for HF.

Findings

The major complication of cardiovascular diseases in elderly patients is HF (68.6%). Hospitalization rates due to HF in elderly patients have increased in recent years, which is associated with the population aging process. This trend will be most likely continue. Despite significant improvements in HF treatment, readmission rates are still high. HF is the most commonly revealed cause of readmission (48% of all readmissions). About 6–9 months after the primary hospitalization due to HF, readmission for any reason was 60%. Patients had concomitant diseases, including hypertension (43%), myocardial infarction (14%), diabetes (36%) and stroke (8%), affecting the readmission rate.

Originality/value

HF remains an important problem in public health. During HF-associated hospitalizations, both cardiac and non-cardiac conditions should be addressed, which has the potential for health problems and disease progression. Some readmissions may be prevented by the proper selection of medicines and monitoring.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2020

Yasmina Bahlil, Djamil Krouf, Zoheir Mellouk, Nawal Taleb-Dida and Akila Guenzet

This study aims to examine whether Globularia alypum (Ga) lyophilized aqueous leaves extract treatment improves cardiometabolic syndromes such as hyperglycemia, lipid…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether Globularia alypum (Ga) lyophilized aqueous leaves extract treatment improves cardiometabolic syndromes such as hyperglycemia, lipid profiles and oxidative damage resulting from a high-fructose diet induced in hypertriglyceridemic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 24 male Wistar rats weighing 80 ± 5 g were first randomly divided into 2 groups. A total of 12 control rats (C) were fed a standard-diet (St-D) and 12 high fructose (HF) rats were fed a high-fructose diet (HF-D) containing St-D in which cornstarch was substituted by fructose (61.4%). After 15 weeks of feeding, body weight (BW) was about 320 ± 20 g and hypertriglyceridemia was noted in HF vs C group (2.69 ± 0.49 mmol/L) vs (1.25 ± 0.33 mmol/L). Each group of rats was then divided into two equal groups (n = 6) and fed during four weeks either a St-D or HF-D, treated or not with 1% of Ga extract (C-Ga) and (HF-Ga). After 28 days, fasting rats were anesthetized and blood and tissues were removed to measure biochemical parameters.

Findings

The results showed no significant differences in BW and insulinemia between all groups. Ga extract supplementation reduced glycemia (−36%), glycosylated hemoglobin (−37%), Homeostasis Model of Assessment-Insulin Resistance index (−34%) and triacylglycerol’s contents in plasma (−33%), very low density lipoproteins–low density lipoproteins (VLDL-LDL) (−48%), liver (−52%) and aorta (−39%); total cholesterol concentrations in aorta was 3.7-fold lower in HF-Ga vs HF group. Ga treatment reduced lipid peroxidation in plasma, VLDL-LDL, red blood cells (RBC), liver, muscle and kidney by improving superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in RBC and catalase (CAT) activity in kidney (p < 0.05). Moreover, Ga ameliorates glutathione (GSH) production in RBC (+41%) and kidney tissues (+35%).

Originality/value

Ga extract ameliorated cardiometabolic syndrome by its hypotriglyceridemic effect and prevented development of insulin resistance. It reduces lipid peroxidation by enhancing non-enzymatic (GSH) and enzymatic (SOD, GPx and CAT) antioxidant defense systems in high-fructose hypertriglyceridemic rats. Therefore, supplementation of Ga leaves extract as an adjuvant could be used for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and the prevention and/or the management of cardio-metabolic adverse effects.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Virginie Amilien, Barbara Tocco and Paal Strandbakken

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of hybrid forums as tools to address specific controversies related to sustainable practices in localized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and evaluate the role of hybrid forums as tools to address specific controversies related to sustainable practices in localized agro-food systems (LAFS).

Design/methodology/approach

In contrast with other conventional public engagement methods, such as citizen juries, consensus conferences, focus groups or deliberative processes, hybrid forums entail a more dynamic and democratic mechanism to reflect and act together, with the aim of constructing a common project around a defined challenge (Callon et al., 2001, 2009). They can offer an enriching and challenging methodological approach in the context of LAFS, especially in the discussion of controversial issues around food chain sustainability. The authors present here a new generation of hybrid forums: HF 2.0.

Findings

HF 2.0. represent both a methodological tool and a real experience of dialogic democracy, two interactive aspects which are closely interlinked and rest upon each other. The authors argue that the attractiveness of HF 2.0. is notable in at least two ways: first, they provide a solid democratic and reflective mechanism to stimulate effective dialogue and knowledge-exchange among different stakeholders; second, they contribute as an important methodological evidence-based tool, which can be used as a launching pad for shaping local action groups and community partnerships’ strategies aimed at fostering local development.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to provide a methodological discussion over the experimental use of HF 2.0. in the context of LAFS and assesses their effectiveness in the co-construction of knowledge. The authors explore their pragmatic validity in addressing controversies over local and sustainable seafood via empirical applications in Norway and the UK.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Rebecca Schiff, Bernie Pauly, Shana Hall, Kate Vallance, Andrew Ivsins, Meaghan Brown, Erin Gray, Bonnie Krysowaty and Joshua Evans

Recently, Managed Alcohol Programs (MAPs have emerged as an alcohol harm reduction model for those living with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) and experiencing…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, Managed Alcohol Programs (MAPs have emerged as an alcohol harm reduction model for those living with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) and experiencing homelessness. There is still a lack of clarity about the role of these programs in relation to Housing First (HF) discourse. The authors examine the role of MAPs within a policy environment that has become dominated by a focus on HF approaches to addressing homelessness. This examination includes a focus on Canadian policy contexts where MAPs originated and are still predominately located. The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of MAPs as a novel response to homelessness among people experiencing severe AUD and to describe the place of MAPs within a HF context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper outlines the development of discourses related to persons experiencing severe AUD and homelessness, with a focus on HF and MAPs as responses to these challenges. The authors compare the key characteristics of MAPs with “core principles” and values as outlined in various definitions of HF.

Findings

MAPs incorporate many of the core values or principles of HF as outlined in some definitions, although not all. MAPs (and other housing/treatment models) provide critical housing and support services for populations who might not fit well with or who might not prefer HF models.

Originality/value

The “silver bullet” discourse surrounding HF (and harm reduction) can obscure the importance of programs (such as MAPs) that do not fully align with all HF principles and program models. This is despite the fact that MAPs (and other models) provide critical housing and support services for populations who might fall between the cracks of HF models. There is the potential for MAPs to help fill a gap in the application of harm reduction in HF programs. The authors also suggest a need to move beyond HF discourse, to embrace complexity and move toward examining what mixture of different housing and harm reduction supports are needed to provide a complete or comprehensive array of services and supports for people who use substances and are experiencing homelessness.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Daniel K. Malone, Susan E. Collins and Seema L. Clifasefi

Chronic homelessness is a serious public health issue that places a strain on health-care and criminal justice systems. Typical housing models place requirements on…

Abstract

Purpose

Chronic homelessness is a serious public health issue that places a strain on health-care and criminal justice systems. Typical housing models place requirements on chronically homeless individuals that are often experienced as insurmountable barriers to housing. Housing First (HF) models attempt to more effectively reach this population, and an emerging version of this is the single-site HF approach introduced by Seattle’s DESC. Single-site HF entails the provision of immediate, permanent, low-barrier supportive housing to chronically homeless individuals within a single building. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this case report, the authors use DESC’s 1811 Eastlake, a well-known and well-researched application of the single-site HF approach, as an example to describe single-site HF, enumerate its underlying principles, and provide a strong evidence base for its replication.

Findings

The paper provides information and insight into elements of a successful single-site HF program and what it looks like in practice.

Research limitations/implications

1811 Eastlake is one specific application of the single-site HF approach focused specifically on chronically homeless individuals with severe alcohol problems who are the highest utilizers of publicly funded services. Due to the specific nature of the population, the findings presented may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to continue evaluating the outcomes of single-site HF programs on alcohol use, mental health and quality of life outcomes for all populations receiving single-site HF.

Practical implications

The accumulating research and clinical evidence have indicated that HF is key to engaging and housing chronically homeless individuals.

Social implications

These ongoing efforts stand to decrease the burden of chronic homelessness for affected individuals, their families, communities and society-at-large.

Originality/value

Many housing providers look to DESC’s 1811 as a model program. This paper fulfills an identified need to describe a successful model of single-site HF for purposes of replication.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Gene Fliedner

In order to provide the appropriate demand forecast information given various managerial levels and functional disciplines within organizations, reliance on family‐based…

Abstract

In order to provide the appropriate demand forecast information given various managerial levels and functional disciplines within organizations, reliance on family‐based forecasting is increasing. The family‐based approach, sometimes referred to as hierarchical forecasting (HF), is based on a strategy of aggregating items into families. HF systems are capable of providing forecasts for items and their respective families. The objectives of HF systems, include improved forecast performance and a reduction in the overall forecasting burden. To date, several studies have offered practical guidelines for the structural design of HF systems. The primary purpose of this paper is to summarize these guidelines. First, an explanation of the HF process is provided. In this explanation, important system parameters and strategic choices, which allow for the custom configuration of HF systems are identified. Second, the relevant family‐based forecast research is reviewed. The important issues addressed and the conclusions presented in this research are identified. Third, practical guidelines regarding the use of a HF approach that have been reported in the research literature are clearly delineated. With much still unknown regarding the performance impact of various system parameter and strategic process choices, the paper concludes with suggestions for future research.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 101 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Tao Wang, Zhanli Liu, Yue Gao, Xuan Ye and Zhuo Zhuang

The interaction between hydraulic fracture (HF) and natural fracture (NF) in naturally fractured rocks is critical for hydraulic fracturing. This paper aims to focus on…

Abstract

Purpose

The interaction between hydraulic fracture (HF) and natural fracture (NF) in naturally fractured rocks is critical for hydraulic fracturing. This paper aims to focus on investigating the development of tensile and shear debonding zone on the NF caused by the stresses produced by HF, and the influence of NF’s debonding behavior on the interaction between HF and NF.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretically, tensile and shear debonding modes of NF are considered, two dimensionless parameters are proposed to characterize the difficulty of tensile and shear failure of NF, respectively. Numerically, a finite element model combining the extended finite element method and cohesive zone method (CZM) is proposed to study NF’s debonding behavior and its influence on the interaction between HF and NF.

Findings

Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show the existence of two debonding modes. The numerical results also show that the HF can cross, offset or propagate along the NFs depending on the parameters’ value, resulting in different fracture network and stimulated reservoir volume. When they are large, the NF’s debonding area is small, HF tends to cross the NF and the fracture network is simple; when they are small, the NF’s debonding area is large, HF will propagate along the NF. In addition, HF is easier to propagate along with NF under tensile debonding mode while it is easier to pass through NF under shear debonding mode.

Originality/value

The theoretical and numerical considerations are taken into account in the influence of the debonding of NFs on the interaction between HFs and NFs and the influence on the formation of the fracture network.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Shu‐Hao Chuang and Zuu‐Chang Hong

Solutions of the twin plane jets HF chemical laser flow based on aturbulent kinetic theory, due to a modified Green’s function method, arepresented. The calculated results…

Abstract

Solutions of the twin plane jets HF chemical laser flow based on a turbulent kinetic theory, due to a modified Green’s function method, are presented. The calculated results of probability density function (PDF) of various chemical species in velocity space, and mass fraction concentration distributions of various reactants and products in the flow field, are revealed and discussed in this analysis. The transport phenomena of different pumping rate, collisional deactivation rate, and radiative deactivation rate in the interaction between the twin plane jets HF chemical laser show that the properties of species mass fraction concentrations, collisional reaction rate, and radiative incident intensity are the dominant factors. The present study provides the fundamentals for theoretical understanding of twin plane jets HF chemical laser and further application to multiple‐jet HF chemical laser analysis.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Thomas A. Hanson

An agent-based market simulation is utilized to examine the impact of high frequency trading (HFT) on various aspects of the stock market. This study aims to provide a…

Abstract

Purpose

An agent-based market simulation is utilized to examine the impact of high frequency trading (HFT) on various aspects of the stock market. This study aims to provide a baseline understanding of the effect of HFT on markets by using a paradigm of zero-intelligence traders and examining the resulting structural changes.

Design/methodology/approach

A continuous double auction setting with zero-intelligence traders is used by adapting the model of Gode and Sunder (1993) to include algorithmic high frequency (HF) traders who retrade by marking up their shares by a fixed percentage. The simulation examines the effects of two independent factors, the number of HF traders and their markup percentage, on several dependent variables, principally volume, market efficiency, trader surplus and volatility. Results of the simulations are tested with two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests.

Findings

In the simulation results, trading volume, efficiency and total surplus vary directly with the number of traders employing HFT. Results also reveal that market volatility increased with the number of HF traders.

Research limitations/implications

Increases in volume, efficiency and total surplus represent market improvements due to the trading activities of HF traders. However, the increase in volatility is worrisome, and some of the surplus increase appears to come at the expense of long-term-oriented investors. However, the relatively recent development of HFT and dearth of appropriate data make direct calibration of any model difficult.

Originality/value

The simulation study focuses on the structural impact of HF traders on several aspects of the simulated market, with the effects isolated from other noise and problems with empirical data. A baseline for comparison and suggestions for future research are established.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Moses Acquaah and Eddy K. Tukamushaba

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of the human factor (HF), organizational justice and the interaction between the two on individual employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of the human factor (HF), organizational justice and the interaction between the two on individual employees’ perceptions of the effectiveness with which their organizations undertake activities in two sub-Saharan African countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from two samples containing public sector and private sector organizations from two sub-Saharan African economies – Ghana (n=158) and Uganda (n=208). Hierarchical regression analysis was utilized to analyze the survey data from the two countries separately.

Findings

The HF dimensions of moral capital and human capabilities, and organizational justice were related to individual employees’ perceptions of the effectiveness of their organizations in both studies. In particular, higher perceptions of organizational justice at the workplace enhanced the impact of the HF dimensions of moral capital and human capabilities on individual employees’ perceptions of the effectiveness with which their organizations perform activities.

Practical implications

Organizations in sub-Saharan Africa should emphasize the development of the HF qualities that focus on moral capital and the utilization and application of the knowledge, skills and abilities embedded in employees at the workplace. In particular, moral capital could play a critical role in ameliorating counter-productive attitudes and behaviors such as shirking, bribery and corruption in organizations. Moreover organizations in sub-Saharan Africa can improve their effectiveness by developing fair decision-making procedures and interactions between management/supervisors and subordinates.

Originality/value

The study provides the first empirical investigation of the link between the HF and perceived effectiveness of organizations, and how organizational justice moderates this relationship in a sub-Saharan African environment.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000