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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Martin Gibson and Jim Kidd

Whilst there are potential benefits to be gained from the consultative approach to the management of health and safety at work required by recent legislation, the actual…

Abstract

Whilst there are potential benefits to be gained from the consultative approach to the management of health and safety at work required by recent legislation, the actual implementation of such consultation is not without its problems. In particular the process of developing effective consultation may actually lead to conflict between participants. The process of implementation calls for careful management if the advantages of consultation are to be achieved.

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Employee Relations, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1985

Peter Ellis and David Tong

Without doubt office work is becoming more hazardous. Much health and safety literature deals with risks that are always with us — like falling off ladders, tripping over…

Abstract

Without doubt office work is becoming more hazardous. Much health and safety literature deals with risks that are always with us — like falling off ladders, tripping over cables, toppling file cabinets and blocked fire exits. But there is increasing worldwide concern now over the health hazards of toxic materials in the office, viral and bacterial infection from air conditioning systems, radiation hazards from VDUs, and the danger of strain injuries from repetitive use of badly designed equipment.

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Facilities, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2019

David A. Sleet

Building a culture of safety in transportation is not dissimilar from building a culture of safety in health. Public health is widely known for protecting the public from…

Abstract

Building a culture of safety in transportation is not dissimilar from building a culture of safety in health. Public health is widely known for protecting the public from diseases through milk pasteurization and chlorination of drinking water, and from injuries by implementing environmental and occupational safeguards and fostering behavioral change. Lifestyle and environmental changes that have contributed to the reductions in smoking and heart disease can also help change driving, walking and cycling behaviors, and environments. Stimulating a culture of safety on the road means providing safe and accessible transportation for all. The vision for a culture of traffic safety is to change the public’s attitude about the unacceptable toll from traffic injuries and to implement a systems approach to traffic injury prevention as a means for improving public health and public safety. Framing the motor vehicle injury problem in this way provides an opportunity for partnerships between highway safety and public health to improve the culture of safety.

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Traffic Safety Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-617-4

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Kuok Ho Daniel Tang

This review compares the primary occupational safety and health (OSH) laws of the ASEAN members against the major provisions of the primary OSH laws of the United Kingdom…

Abstract

Purpose

This review compares the primary occupational safety and health (OSH) laws of the ASEAN members against the major provisions of the primary OSH laws of the United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US) grouped under the themes for OSH law adopted by the International Labour Organization (ILO).

Design/methodology/approach

This review employs the 11 themes for OSH law adopted by the ILO as the basis of comparison. As the themes lack specificity in terms of their respective contents, specific facets of the themes are drawn from the review of the primary OSH laws of the UK and the US.

Findings

The review shows that primary OSH laws of the ASEAN members encompass the fundamental aspects of the ILO OSH themes particularly the regulatory framework, scope, roles of authorities, duties of employers and employees as well as safety inspection and enforcement. The review demonstrates a lack of provision of worksite consultation by the authorities, the emphasis on research, experiment and demonstration by the government as well as certain aspects of training.

Practical implications

OSH in many developing members of the ASEAN is still evolving to advocate the basic rights of employees, protect the safety of the public and ensure the welfare, safety and health of employees are upheld at workplaces. There is an obvious disparity in the coverage of the primary OSH laws of the nations, resulting in widely varied OSH implementation. This study contributes to advancement of the primary OSH laws in developing ASEAN members by highlighting areas of their primary OSH laws that can be improved. Improvement of the primary OSH laws is crucial to subsequent improvement and development of subsidiary laws to provide for adequate protection at workplaces.

Originality/value

Most studies of OSH laws in the ASEAN are country-specific and often theme-specific. There is currently no study which compares the primary OSH laws of ASEAN nations using themes derived from the ILO as well as primary OSH laws of the UK and the US. This review is one of its kinds to use such an approach in providing a comparative overview of the primary OSH laws of all ASEAN nations.

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

James Xolani Nyawera and Theodore Conrad Haupt

This paper aims to report on the development of a model to improve process health and safety within the context of a petrochemical environment to achieve a generative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the development of a model to improve process health and safety within the context of a petrochemical environment to achieve a generative health and safety culture within that sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research methodology and deductive research approach were used in the study. A survey was conducted in a major petrochemical enterprise in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa with 259 returned and duly completed questionnaires. The data was statistically analysed using statistical packages for social science version 25.

Findings

This study found that the key process health and safety critical drivers needed to grow a generative process health and safety culture were leadership commitment, chemical exposure management, health and safety risk assessment, process hazard analysis and permit to work.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa within the petrochemical industry. Because of self-reported methods of data collection, there is a probability of bias existing in the results of the study.

Practical implications

The contribution of this research is to understand, based on theoretical assumptions, how health and safety improvement could be institutionalised in an organisation. The developed model can be used as a practical tool.

Social implications

This paper is part of the larger discussion of increasing importance in health and safety policy-making. This study aims at contributing to the literature in the field of health and safety by incorporating the drivers towards a generative process health and safety culture.

Originality/value

This study provides a model to assist senior management to reduce exposure to process health and safety hazards in the petrochemical industry and improve overall performance.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Anita Levinson

Self‐regulation of health and safety within a legal framework was recommended by the Robens Committee Report (1972). Every organisation will be affected by various…

Abstract

Self‐regulation of health and safety within a legal framework was recommended by the Robens Committee Report (1972). Every organisation will be affected by various factors, both internal and external, which will determine how self‐regulation of health and safety will evolve, and these factors will also influence the effectiveness of joint self‐regulation by management and representatives of the workforce. The effects of some of these internal factors on joint self‐regulation of health and safety in a Scottish local authority are focused on mainly, while, at the same time, some of the external factors are identified.

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Employee Relations, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

P.B. Beaumont, J.R. Coyle and J.W. Leopold

The safety representative/committee regulations of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which became law in October 1978, have led to a substantial health and safety

Abstract

The safety representative/committee regulations of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which became law in October 1978, have led to a substantial health and safety training programme being mounted by the TUC. In May 1977 a special TUC Conference on workplace health and safety discussed a variety of matters pertaining to this subject area. Among their most important decisions was one reaffirming that the emphasis of such training should be on TUC approved courses only, with the key functions of such training being to help identify health and safety issues in the workplace, find appropriate means and standards for dealing with health and safety problems and help establish an “infallible union workplace organisation” to ensure that the employers actually implemented safety measures. The TUC's target was that some 160,000 safety representatives would have undergone such training by 1980. In fact the TUC failed to attain this extremely ambitious target figure as is evidenced by the following figures:

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Hilary Omatule Onubi, Nor'Aini Yusof and Ahmad Sanusi Hassan

This study aims to assess the impact of adopting selected green construction site practices on the health and safety performance of the construction projects. The impact…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the impact of adopting selected green construction site practices on the health and safety performance of the construction projects. The impact of storm-water management, energy management and construction waste management on projects health and safety performance was also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to collect information from Class A contractors in Nigeria, and 168 usable responses were received. The data were analysed using the partial least squares (PLSs) structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

The findings indicate that energy management and waste management practices have significant effects on the health and safety performance of the construction projects, while storm-water management has no effect.

Practical implications

Project and site managers need to take into consideration the skill set of their workforce when attempting to adopt new innovative construction strategies the workers are unfamiliar with in a changing construction environment. There is also a need for more training of workers on generic and specific green skills to avoid health and safety challenges on site.

Originality/value

The findings of this study make significant contribution to the debate on the health and safety performance of green projects, as only a few studies have been conducted on this topic. The empirical relationships between the constructs of energy management, waste management, storm-water management and health and safety performance are unique in the context of other related studies and have advanced the body of existing knowledge.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Heidi Elizabeth Börner and Sandra Lassowski

Based on the research findings the authors derive propositions for further research to explore the role of safety and ethical leadership in enhancing health and safety

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the research findings the authors derive propositions for further research to explore the role of safety and ethical leadership in enhancing health and safety performance within New Zealand companies. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on quantitative and qualitative health and safety data collected by Börner in New Zealand and analysed in the (unpublished) Master Thesis of Lassowski “Supporting Aspects of Organisational culture on Occupational Health and Safety” (2014) the authors will examine in this paper the responses of company governance and senior leadership to reports made from front-line staff about their perception of the safety culture and (potential) threats to health and safety.

Findings

The data indicate that company governance and senior leadership are sometimes reluctant to give adequate responses to employee reporting and fail to take effective measures to protect people and the business.

Research limitations/implications

Directors and senior leaders need to be vigilant that the company systems remain compliant with Health and Safety legislation and are aligned with best practices in the sector/organisation. Reports from employees using company systems on a daily basis are vital to assure that those systems work as they should, and that action can be taken when (potential) threats to health and safety are reported.

Originality/value

The workplace has a significant influence on injury, illness, fatalities and threats to environmental, community and individual wellbeing and this influence can be positive or negative. The research explores the link between the ethics of organisational leadership and its influence on workplace health and safety climate and outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Sue Aucott

Describes schools’ obligations under UK health and safety legislation, and the challenge posed to schools by the Health of the Nation targets on accident prevention…

Abstract

Describes schools’ obligations under UK health and safety legislation, and the challenge posed to schools by the Health of the Nation targets on accident prevention. Schools’ relative lack of awareness of these obligations caused the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) to initiate a project aimed at producing a training resource for schools, which would help them address their responsibilities. The project received funding from the Department for Education and Employment, the Department of Health, the then Department of Transport, the Health and Safety Executive and The Scottish Office. The result was the resource, Together Safely: Developing a Whole School Approach to Health and Safety. This aims to encourage schools to develop an ethos that promotes health and safety, and to take advantage of the many opportunities that exist to promote and develop health and safety skills and strategies both through the curriculum and good practice.

Details

Health Education, vol. 98 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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