Search results

1 – 10 of 186
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Samantha Bennett, Predrag Djukic and Rupa Kapitzki

The study aims to report on how electronic resources of Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT) library are being promoted through information literacy sessions and how quick…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to report on how electronic resources of Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT) library are being promoted through information literacy sessions and how quick response (QR) codes are created for patrons for ease of access to these electronic resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The QR codes created are displayed in the library to attract attention of the patron. Information literacy sessions include database training and how to access e-resources through the library website. Database posters and PowerPoint presentations are displayed in the library. Student Research blog and subject LibGuides are created with access to databases content as necessary. Library volunteer projects include extensive database searches.

Findings

While accessing the databases through Student Research blog, LibGuides, volunteer project work and QR codes the usage statistics of these resources have shown an increase. QR code poster attracted attention from many patrons, followed by curiosity to access the databases and eventual access of the databases as evidenced through email inquiry and troubleshooting.

Research limitations/implications

Usage statistics harvested from vendor platforms is only available system wide and not per HCT campus locations. It is thus not possible to report per location or track usage per location. More advanced analytical tools are required in future to extract more specific data for further deeper analysis.

Practical implications

Findings recommend future online information literacy courses offered through the proposed virtual library platform to be easily accessible through the Blackboard Learn mobile application including more subject specific resources from databases in their content. The more the databases are used by patron, the higher the chances are they will be renewed for subscription.

Social implications

Academic libraries work closely and collaboratively with database vendors and aggregators to promote information literacy. Vice versa if libraries are promoting their databases through information literacy sessions and easier access through QR codes – then it is a mutual symbiosis for growth benefitting the academic community.

Originality/value

A majority of HCT library patrons are UAE nationals – the future leaders of the country. Using rich resources through the databases and lifelong learning skills through information literacy sessions – provides them with authentic information enriching their knowledge and application of skills encouraging, which fosters innovation.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Akuraun Shadrach Iyortsuun, Meshach G. Goyit and Reuel J. Dakung

Drawing on the human capital theory and the dual model of passion, this study aims to explore the mediating role of passion on the relationship between entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the human capital theory and the dual model of passion, this study aims to explore the mediating role of passion on the relationship between entrepreneurship education programme and students’ attitude towards self-employment (SE).

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed research framework was tested on a sample of 445 higher education students in four universities in North-Central Nigeria.

Findings

The results indicated that learning and inspiration account for the variation in students’ attitude towards SE. Furthermore, the study revealed that harmonious and obsessive passion largely mediate the relationship between entrepreneurship education programme and attitude towards SE.

Practical implications

The policy implication is the scaling of policies targeted at encouraging the development of passion given its significant role in the entrepreneurship education programme and attitude towards SE link.

Originality/value

The study has established the importance of human capital theory in explaining the attitude towards SE phenomenon using a multi-theoretical approach and has advanced the theoretical field of affect and its relevance in the field of entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

John Raven

The purpose of this paper is to discuss issues and imbalances in the workforce in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) that result from the nation's relatively recent emergence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss issues and imbalances in the workforce in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) that result from the nation's relatively recent emergence as a powerful economy in the world. A federal initiative entitled Emiratization is addressed that is intended to improve employment amongst the local Emirati population who, at present, make up a minority of the working population. The role that one federal tertiary education system, the Higher Colleges of Technology (HCT), contributes to this process is discussed with specific implications and challenges for Emiratizing the education system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on secondary research concerning employment statistics and policy in the UAE and observations of HCT, specifically the BEd program within the colleges.

Findings

Three main challenges facing HCT in its attempt to train Emiratis for employment in the education sector in the UAE are discussed in the paper.

Practical implications

There are practical implications and suggestions discussed for improving the Emiratization of the teaching sector in the UAE. This sector is highlighted as a core area for the Emiratization initiative by the paper.

Originality/value

The UAE represents a unique cultural context, a blending of languages, religion, politics and ethics, with calls for rapid modernization of its government schools. This paper maps out the growing pains and so is of value to both educators and policy makers in similar settings.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tanweer Ali

The purpose of this study is to present the book Education, Economy and Society, edited by Salim Vally and Enver Motala (UNISA Press, Pretoria, 2014), which highlights the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present the book Education, Economy and Society, edited by Salim Vally and Enver Motala (UNISA Press, Pretoria, 2014), which highlights the main concepts introduced and discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study primarily summarizes the critique of human capital theory (HCT) which is developed in the book. This is done using different approaches and is comprehensive in scope. The study also introduces some of the alternative visions of education as presented by the contributing authors. The author of the review also draws on other literature which addresses the same fields.

Findings

HCT dominates the discourse on the role of education in society, but the concept is hard to measure and evidence of its importance is scant. Despite the criticism of this theory, it continues to dominate the mainstream economic theory.

Research limitations/implications

The main premise merits more systematic study, ideally drawing on more extensive literature, and extending beyond the confines of any one country. As a review, this study aimed to maintain a focus on this one important collection.

Social implications

HCT tends to promote a view of education as a tool of material economic progress. This excludes a discussion of social justice and de-emphasizes the role of education in advancing individual fulfilment and in strengthening democratic values. A view of useful human activity outside of production within a corporate environment is also ignored. This book covers all of these ideas.

Originality/value

This study draws attention to an important book which discusses the proper role of education in economic development and critiques policy making in South Africa. The book is broad enough in scope to be of relevance to educators, academics and policy makers in the developing and developed worlds.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tim Martin and Michael O'Brien

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the experiences of a teacher education program in the United Arab Emirates to demonstrate how a program can best balance the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the experiences of a teacher education program in the United Arab Emirates to demonstrate how a program can best balance the particular needs of a country's educational system with the requirements of international recognition, including benchmarking to international standards and undertaking formal third‐party accreditation.

Design/methodology/approach

The process begins first with the self‐reflection or analysis, reviewing the program terms of curriculum, assessment, clinical practice, faculty and operational indicators, coupled with a formal review of the market and economic drivers to determine future directions for the programs' offerings. After a year‐long analysis, the program was able to look at its operations personally, through the eyes of an external agency familiar with it, and those of an external expert in the field. This triangular process parallels the process that accrediting agencies employ to determine the health or effectiveness of the program to meet its mission.

Findings

After a process of deliberation, the program decided upon the Teacher Education Accreditation Council as the most appropriate agency to pursue accreditation with.

Originality/value

Many times international institutions must sacrifice or modify their existing programs to accommodate the traditional requirements of the outside accrediting agency. However, the paper shows that by thoroughly reviewing and investigating the agencies and their criteria, an institution can determine which agency will serve its needs and provide for a meaningful and successful partnership in the quest for accreditation and recognition.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Khaled M. M. Koriem and Mahmoud S.S. Arbid

This paper aims to evaluate hematological parameters, blood glutathione (GSH), serum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-PD) and liver function in favism animals' models…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate hematological parameters, blood glutathione (GSH), serum glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-PD) and liver function in favism animals' models after oral intake with a mixture of pickled olives and Vicia faba (V. faba) seeds.

Design/methodology/approach

Favism is a life-threatening hemolytic crisis. It results from the ingestion of V. faba by the individuals. The hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), serum glucose, blood GSH, serum G6-PD, serum thiobarbaturic acid reactive substances (TBARS), liver protein and liver function were evaluated after oral administration with a mixture of pickled olives with V. faba seeds in favism animals' models.

Findings

The favism-, vicine- and convicine-treated animals showed a significant decrease (p < 0.01) in Hb (6.42, 7.23 and 5.96 g/dl), Hct (25.4, 26.4 and 25.1%), RBCs (2.56, 2.45 and 2.60 106 cells/mm3, WBCs (4.35, 4.25 and 4.30 103 cells/mm3), serum glucose (95.8, 97.1 and 96.5 mg/dl), blood GSH (24.7, 26.6 and 23.8 mg/dl), serum G6-PD (15.8, 15.9 and 15.7 U/L), serum aspartate aminotransferase (6.35, 6.59 and 5.97 U/L), alanine aminotransferase (4.49, 4.61 and 4.50 U/L), total protein (6.54, 6.59 and 6.40 g/dl), albumin (3.84, 3.91 and 3.75 g/dl), globulin (2.70, 2.48 and 2.65 g/dl) and liver protein (3.37, 3.10 and 3.42 g/g tissue) but a significant increase (p < 0.01) in serum TBARS (38.7, 38.9 and 39.4 nmol/dl), alkaline phosphatase (275, 271 and 281 U/L) and total bilirubin (0.93, 0.89 and 0.91 mg/dl) compared to Hb (16.3 g/dl), Hct (45.3%), RBCs (5.80 106 cells/mm3), WBCs (9.45 103 cells/mm3), serum glucose (96.5 mg/dl), blood GSH (39.7 mg/dl), serum G6-PD (36.1 U/L), serum TBARS (18.0 nmol/dl), serum aspartate aminotransferase (19.8 U/L), alanine aminotransferase (9.23 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (214 U/L), total bilirubin (0.57 mg/dl), total protein (8.76 g/dl), albumin (4.85 g/dl), globulin (3.91 g/dl) and liver protein (6.28 g/g tissue) in control group. The oral administration with pickled olives + V. faba, pickled olives + vicine and pickled olives + convicine into favism animals' models, vicine-treated animals and convicine-treated animals, respectively pushed all the above-mentioned parameters to near the control levels.

Originality/value

V. faba contains vicine and convicine glycosides. Vicine and convicine glycosides in V. faba are hydrolyzed by intestinal microflora to aglycones divicine and isouramil, respectively. Divicine and isouramil are highly reactive compounds generating free radicals where divicine and isouramil are the main factors of favism. The ß-glucosidase in pickled olives converts both vicine and convicine glycosides into aglycones divicine and isouramil, respectively, in aerobic condition outside the human body (in inactive forms) and prevent these glycosides to cause favism.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kashif Farhat, Wajeeha Aslam and Bin Mohd. Mokhtar Sany Sanuri

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that influence the intention to choose family takaful in Pakistan through using theory of reasoned action (TRA…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that influence the intention to choose family takaful in Pakistan through using theory of reasoned action (TRA) model. While family takaful is not a new financial solution in the market, the main factors that motivate customers to purchase family takaful remain unexplored. To fill this gap, this paper investigated the impact of attitude (ATT), subjective norm (SBN) with the addition of Halal certification (HCT) to predict the behavioral intention of customers in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample data of 250 respondents was drawn for this paper. The respondents were the regular visitors to the Islamic banks in Pakistan and were selected through judgmental sampling. Of 250, total 237 responses were included in the final study, after excluding the inappropriate and missing responses. For the final data, EFA, CFA and SEM were used to test the significance of relationships between the IVs (ATT, SBN and HCT) and DV (BI).

Findings

Findings from the SEM analysis suggest that ATT, SBN and HCT have positive significant relationships with BI. SBN appeared to be the most influencing factor that influences the behavioral intention to purchase family takaful.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has practical implications for takaful managers and academics. Bank managers can draw marketing communication policy based on the findings of this paper. While for academics, this paper laid a foundation for future studies by integrating Halal certification in TRA as a predictor to the behavioral intention towards selecting family takaful. The empirical nature of this paper will enhance understanding of the Islamic financial market and its customers specifically.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper also hold significance for managers and policy-makers of Islamic financial institutes. It guides to design the marketing strategies to develop the right attitude of customers, emphasize subjective norms and Halal certification when communicating the family takaful products to customers. As such, brand managers of family takaful may leverage the role of belief in developing the right attitude and then linking it to the family takaful brand. The attitude is rooted in the belief, and for family takaful brands, it potentially be useful to allow it a broader space in the brand strategies. Likewise, subjective norms in terms of choosing family takaful comprises the perceived social pressure of customers feel towards purchasing takaful for families. It highlights the role of social contacts and effect of their behavior and choices over customers. The recommendations and positive feedback customers receive from their social contacts can be instrumental in instilling the sale of family takaful. In the context of Halal certification, the findings of this paper call takaful brand managers’ attention to the significant role Shariah compliance plays for potential customers of family takaful.

Social implications

The findings of the paper also have significance for managers and policy-makers of Islamic financial institutes. The findings of this paper guide them to develop marketing strategies, develop the right attitude of customers, emphasize subjective norms and Halal certification when communicating the family Takaful products to customers.

Originality/value

Family takaful is relatively a new phenomenon that demands empirical evidence for academics and managers. This is one of the early studies that investigates the determinants of purchase of family takaful through extended TRA model. Therefore, this investigation will serve as a cornerstone to the scant knowledge of family takaful in Pakistan and around the globe.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Faye Cocchiara, Myrtle P. Bell and Daphne Perkins Berry

To compare and contrast the experiences, challenges, and career mobility of black women and Latinas in the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

To compare and contrast the experiences, challenges, and career mobility of black women and Latinas in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Extant literature and data from the US Census Bureau, the US Department of Labor, the Pew Hispanic Research Center, and other relevant repositories were used to assess the workforce participation, education, and income for women of color. Specifically, their representation in organizational positions was examined, considering historical and social influences that affect this representation. Relevant human capital theory (HCT) was applied to consider its predictive power for outcomes of black women and Latinas in the workplace.

Findings

Although women of color are increasing proportions of all women in the US labor force, equal opportunity legislation (now in its fifth decade) has improved their status less than would be expected by their education and workforce participation. HCT does not adequately explain the experiences of Latinas and black women.

Practical implications

Being aware of barriers that black women and Latinas face in the workplace will prevent organizations from devaluing a growing segment of workers and help them compete in an increasingly competitive market.

Originality/value

While black women and Latinas are the most numerous women of color in the US workforce, the relatively small amount of research on women of color, particularly Latinas, remains a gaping hole in the field. Thus, the value of this article is that it adds to the literature on the workplace experiences of an important segment of the US population.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Masood A. Badri, Mohamed Abdulla and Abdelwahab Al‐Madani

The main objective of the study was to utilize SERVQUAL for identifying gaps in the chain of services provided by the information technology (IT) resources. SERVQUAL was…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of the study was to utilize SERVQUAL for identifying gaps in the chain of services provided by the information technology (IT) resources. SERVQUAL was applied to IT services in higher education institutions in the United Arab Emirates.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the many concerns and reservations raised with regard to using perception scores or gap scores, the appropriateness of the SERVQUAL measure to verify the anticipated structure of the instrument was also examined. Using confirmatory factor analysis, the structure of the perception scores (performance‐based model) and the gap scores (performance minus expectation‐based model) were examined.

Findings

The evaluation of model‐fit provided mixed results, but, in general, the results favored the perception scores. However, some statistical fit‐tests suggested that both models lacked the features necessary for a good fit. On the other hand, based on their feedback, respondents felt that SERVQUAL is a useful indicator for IT center service quality in institutions of higher education. SERVQUAL identified gaps in service quality for the three institutions. Empirical results of SERVQUAL scores for the IT centers in the three institutions are also presented.

Originality/value

The paper reassesses the structure and validity of the SERVQUAL model given its wide use and criticism, and applies the model to an important set of related, yet distinct service organizations such as information technology centers.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Michel Ferrary

The purpose of this paper is explore an organizational design that allows firms to invest in transferable strategic human capital. Strategic human capital requires…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is explore an organizational design that allows firms to invest in transferable strategic human capital. Strategic human capital requires considerable investment in training costs, effective compensation, opportunities for professional development and expectancy of long employment relationship within a firm. A firm can undertake investment in strategic knowledge and workers can engage in learning only in these circumstances. However, there are a number of risks that are associated with investment in strategic human capital within a firm. In this paper, the author argues that providing strategic human capital to other firms within alliances could be a strategy for leveraging resource. Strategic knowledge facilitates transactions between firms possessing co-specialized human capital and tangible resources. Organizational design of an alliance based on co-specialization allows to balance costs and returns for the human capital supplier, as well as for beneficiary and workers. Within an alliance, the human capital supplier provides workers to a beneficiary firm and coordinates their activities. Supplier specialized in human capital investment ensures improved performance, productivity and efficiency of workers. Possibility to form a greater pool of labor force and to centralize training allows optimizing cost and sharing risks associated with investment activity among alliance participants. Human resource practices in an alliance system foster long-term employment relationship. Entering an alliance increases number of job positions, professional development opportunities through horizontal mobility, promotion and learning opportunities for workers. Finally, alliances allow leveraging investment in human capital beyond a single organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualizes the use of alliance based on co-specialization as a strategy to optimize investment in strategic human capital resource. It draws upon the resource-based view (Barney, 1991; Wernerfelt, 1995) and transaction cost theory (Coase, 1937; Williamson, 1981) to examine an alliance as a strategy for leveraging the human capital resources for accessing new markets, building reputation and sharing the risks across more than one organization.

Findings

First, the paper reviews the theoretical literature on human capital as a strategic resource (Becker, 1962; Coff, 1997), its sourcing on internal and external labor markets and respective employment systems (Delery and Doty, 1996; Doeringer and Piore, 1971). Second, it focuses on the features of human capital resource (Barney, 1986; Chi, 1994; Doz and Hamel, 1998). Third, it conceptualizes the use of alliances based on co-specialization as organizational structures for investment in human capital across organizations and examines respective employment system and HR practices (Delery and Doty, 1996; Doeringer and Piore, 1971). As result, the author argues that an alliance can be an alternative mean to optimize returns on investment in human capital with strategic transferable knowledge. By consequence, the author describes an alliance employment system and illustrates the arguments with a case of human capital trading in a co-specialization alliance under a long-term management contract in the luxury hotel industry.

Originality/value

This paper discusses collaborative ventures as a sourcing strategy of the human capital. An alliance strategy is relevant for sourcing the strategic human capital resources. Human capital resource can be accessed by firms through transfer of skills and organizational routines within collaborative agreements, such as alliances based on co-specialization. In this case, alliance is an organizational architecture between organizations that improves the efficiency and productivity, reduces marginal cost on training due to larger scale of operations and reduces risk by splitting investment in human capital and by offering more career and development opportunities for strategic knowledge workers.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 10 of 186