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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Silke Op de Beeck, Marijke Verbruggen, Elisabeth Abraham and Rein De Cooman

This paper examines home-to-career interference (HCI), i.e., the extent to which employees perceive that their private life has constrained their career decisions to date…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines home-to-career interference (HCI), i.e., the extent to which employees perceive that their private life has constrained their career decisions to date, from a couple perspective. Building on scarcity theory, the authors expect higher levels of HCI among couples that need more and have less resources and, within couples, among the partner who is most likely to take care of home demands. Therefore, the authors explore the role of children and social support as between-couple differences and gender, relative resources and work centrality as within-couple differences. Moreover, the authors examine how one partner's HCI is related to both partners' life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using hierarchical linear modeling and APIM-analysis with a sample of 197 heterosexual dual-earner couples (N = 394).

Findings

As hypothesized, employees in couples with more children and less social support reported more HCI. No support was found for within-couple differences in gender, educational level or work centrality. Next, HCI was negatively related to employees' own life satisfaction but not to their partner's life satisfaction.

Originality/value

The authors enrich the understanding of HCI by examining this phenomenon from a couple perspective and shed light on couple influences on career experiences.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Torkil Clemmensen

To outline how psychology as one of the original approaches to human‐computer interaction (HCI) has formed a key part of the HCI literature, and to discuss the need for…

Abstract

Purpose

To outline how psychology as one of the original approaches to human‐computer interaction (HCI) has formed a key part of the HCI literature, and to discuss the need for psychological approaches to HCI and system development.

Design/methodology/approach

The contributions to the journal Human‐Computer Interaction is examined from the journal's start in 1985 up to the millennium. The analysis focuses the three main elements, task, user and computer, in the classic study “Psychology of human‐computer interaction” from 1983.

Findings

Provides information about authorship, and form and focus of research published. The paper concludes that already from the beginning, HCI researchers too narrowly used Card et al.'s analytical framework. Today it has developed into a sub‐theory within a multidisciplinary HCI science and in this role it continues to be an important cumulative factor in HCI.

Research limitations/implications

The main conclusion about the role of psychology in HCI only applies to the mainly US authors who published in the journal investigated in the given period. European research focusing on information technology and people may differ in important ways.

Practical implications

A much needed discussion of a central document of historical importance tying together many HCI researchers and a range of HCI studies.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils partly the need for meta‐analyses of the psychological approach to HCI.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Hung-Che Wu and Ching-Chan Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among the experiential quality (EQ) dimensions, experiential satisfaction (ES), experiential involvement (EI)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among the experiential quality (EQ) dimensions, experiential satisfaction (ES), experiential involvement (EI), host city image (HCI), experiential equity (EE), spectator affection (SA) and experiential loyalty (EL) in the sport context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this study were based on a sample of 674 spectators from the finals of the men’s and women’s football tournaments held at the Maracanã Stadium in Rio, indicating that the proposed model fitted the data.

Findings

Findings show that the six EQ dimensions physical environment quality, outcome quality, access quality (AQ), game quality, trip quality (TQ) and security quality (SQ), EI, EE, HCI and SA positively influence ES. Also, EI moderates the relationship between HCI and EL. Moreover, EL is influenced by EI, HCI, SA and ES.

Practical implications

Results will assist sport management in developing and implementing market-orientated service strategies to increase the EQ dimensions, ES, EI, EE, HCI and SA in order to increase EL.

Originality/value

This study provides data that result in a better understanding of the relationships among the EQ dimensions, ES, EI, HCI, EE, SA and EL in the sporting context.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Muhammad Fakhruddin Irfan Sazali, Maleeka Abdullah Hilmy, Norshafarina Shari, Lilik Herawati, Nurul Izza Nordin and Zulhabri Othman

Calorie restricted diets are known to improve health and promote healthy aging. This happens because of controlled inflammation and metabolism in the body. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Calorie restricted diets are known to improve health and promote healthy aging. This happens because of controlled inflammation and metabolism in the body. This study aims to evaluate the differences in anthropometric and biochemical parameters in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats because of consumption of a calorie restricted diet.

Design/methodology/approach

The study divided SD rats (n = 15) into 3 groups consuming high calorie intake (HCI), medium calorie intake and low calorie intake (LCI). Anthropometric parameters were determined through measurement of abdominal circumference (AC), thoracic circumference (TC), body length and body weight (BW). Biochemical parameters analyzed in this study were fasting blood glucose level and full blood lipid profile. Nutritional status was obtained based on food consumption, energy intake (EI) and food efficiency rate. Measurements were taken for a period of four weeks.

Findings

Analysis on anthropometric parameters indicates a significant difference in mean BW between HCI (230.44 ± 1.47 g) and LCI (188.54 ± 1.50 g). There is a significant difference in abdominal TC ratio (p < 0.001; F = 13.599) in the LCI group (1.01 ± 0.00714) compared to the HCI group (1.04 ± 0.00858). Post hoc for nutrition parameters indicates a significant difference in mean EI between HCI (9.71 ± 0.006 kJ) and LCI (3.21 ± 0.001 kJ). There is a significant effect (p < 0.0001; F = 3042872.02) of EI on rats in all three groups. HDL levels were significantly higher (p < 0.0001; F = 1536.89) in the LCI group (68.60 ± 0.55 mg/dL) compared to the HCI group (49.40 ± 0.55 mg/dL). The Pearson’s correlation results show a strong positive correlation in EI with BW (p < 0.01; r = 0.988), AC (p < 0.01; r = 0.970) and body mass index (p < 0.01; r = 0.972).

Originality/value

Low calorie diet has been proven to affect anthropometric development and has shown improvements in biochemical parameters of the rats. This may result in healthy aging which could prevent later-life diseases.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Xia Zhang, Youchao Sun and Yanjun Zhang

Semantic modelling is an essential prerequisite for designing the intelligent human–computer interaction in future aircraft cockpit. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Semantic modelling is an essential prerequisite for designing the intelligent human–computer interaction in future aircraft cockpit. The purpose of this paper is to outline an ontology-based solution to this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The scenario elements are defined considering the cognitive behaviours, system functions, interaction behaviours and interaction situation. The knowledge model consists of a five-tuple array including concepts, relations, functions, axioms and instances. Using the theory of belief-desire-intention, the meta-model of cognitive behaviours is established. The meta-model of system functions is formed under the architecture of sub-functions. Supported by information flows, the meta-model of interaction behaviours is presented. Based on the socio-technical characteristics, the meta-model of interaction situation is proposed. The knowledge representation and reasoning process is visualized with the semantic web rule language (SWRL) on the Protégé platform. Finally, verification and evaluation are carried out to assess the rationality and quality of the ontology model. Application scenarios of the proposed modelling method are also illustrated.

Findings

Verification results show that the knowledge reasoning based on SWRL rules can further enrich the knowledge base in terms of instance attributes and thereby improve the adaptability and learning ability of the ontology model in different simulations. Evaluation results show that the ontology model has a good quality with high cohesion and low coupling.

Practical implications

The approach presented in this paper can be applied to model complex human–machine–environment systems, from a semantics-driven perspective, especially for designing future cockpits.

Originality/value

Different from the traditional approaches, the method proposed in this paper tries to deal with the socio-technical modelling issues concerning multidimensional information semantics. Meanwhile, the constructed model has the ability of autonomous reasoning to adapt to complex situations.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Steve Bailey and Jay Vidyarthi

The purpose of this paper is to question why records management is not currently able to fully meet the needs of its users and to explore the potential role of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to question why records management is not currently able to fully meet the needs of its users and to explore the potential role of human‐computer interaction (HCI) in helping it to address this weakness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has been jointly written by two authors: one a records manager; the other an experienced HCI practitioner. It draws on the experience of the records professional to identify some of the challenges facing records management today, particularly the problems it faces trying to meet the (differing?) needs of both the organization as a whole and of individual users. The HCI practitioner then explores how the application of HCI principles to the design of recordkeeping systems may offer a fresh perspective in meeting these twin demands.

Findings

Records management is heavily reliant on the participation of individual and collective users to achieve its aims, and yet the understanding of their requirements is often basic and simplistic. In part this is due to a concentration on the needs of “the organization” as a whole and of the traditional focus records management has had on standardisation. The authors argue that whilst this organizational perspective remains important, it cannot be addressed at the expense of providing genuine benefits to the individual user. The field of HCI offers a proven, robust and sophisticated way of identifying and meeting the needs of users in ways which could enable records management to meet the needs of both its “masters”.

Practical implications

The application of HCI principles to the design of recordkeeping systems could fundamentally alter the way in which we view the implementation of record management technologies. It also raises questions about the limitations of striving to adopt a purely “standards based” approach to records management which runs counter to much of the prevailing wisdom regarding the perceived objectives of records management.

Originality/value

This paper marks the first exploration of the benefits that might be achieved by applying the field of HCI to records management. As such it represents the first important step towards creating a new inter‐disciplinary approach to achieving records management systems that fully meet the needs of their users.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Luisa Barrera-León, Nadia Mejia-Molina, Angela Carrillo-Ramos, Leonardo Flórez-Valencia and Jaime A. Pavlich-Mariscal

This paper aims to present a detailed description of Tukuchiy, a framework to dynamically generate adapted user interfaces. Tukuchiy is based on Runa-Kamachiy, a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a detailed description of Tukuchiy, a framework to dynamically generate adapted user interfaces. Tukuchiy is based on Runa-Kamachiy, a conceptual integration model that combines human–computer interaction (HCI) standards to create user interfaces with user-centered concepts usually addressed by adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

The first step was the definition of three profiles: user, context and interface. These profiles contain information, such as user disabilities, location characteristics (e.g. illumination) and preferences (e.g. interface color or type of system help). The next step is to define the rules that ensure usability for different users. All of this information is used to create the Tukuchiy framework, which generates dynamic user interfaces, based on the specified rules. The last step is the validation through a prototype called Idukay. This prototype uses Tukuchiy to provide e-learning services. The functionality and usability of the system was evaluated by five experts.

Findings

To validate the approach, a prototype of Tukuchiy, called Idukay, was created. Idukay was evaluated by experts in education, computing and HCI, who based their evaluation in the system usability scale (SUS), a standard usability test. According to them, the prototype complies with the usability criteria addressed by Tukuchiy.

Research limitations/implications

This work was tested in an academic environment and was validated by different experts. Further tests in a production environment are required to fully validate the approach.

Originality/value

Tukuchiy generates adapted user interfaces based on user and context profiles. Tukuchiy uses HCI standards to ensure usability of interfaces that dynamically change during execution time. The interfaces generated by Tukuchiy adapt to context, functionality, disabilities (e.g. color blindness) and preferences (usage and presentation) of the user. Tukuchiy enforces specific HCI standards for color utilization, button size and grouping, etc., during execution.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Netta Iivari

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from an interpretive case study on user participation in the open source software (OSS) development context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from an interpretive case study on user participation in the open source software (OSS) development context.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an empirical, interpretive case study and a literature review utilising the metaphor of text in the analysis, this paper provides a refined conceptualisation of user participation in OSS development.

Findings

The paper reveals that different kinds of meanings have been attached to users and to their participation. User participation is both direct and indirect in the OSS development context. Some user groups actively take part in OSS development, while others are merely represented in it. Different kinds of intermediaries “representing the users” are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on one case study on a small but active OSS project with an interest in users. Other kinds of OSS projects should be analysed. The analysis was focused on a discussion forum, but users can take part in OSS development by other means as well. Paths for future work should include the gathering of more varied empirical data.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that users can provide feedback to the development through discussion forums in the distributed environment, but there is a need to support the users in doing so and the developers in analysing the data. The importance of different kinds of intermediaries “representing the users” is highlighted.

Originality/value

The paper provides thorough empirical insights and a refined conceptualisation of user participation addressing the currently weakly empirically explored OSS development context.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Fatima Isiaka, Kassim S Mwitondi and Adamu M Ibrahim

The purpose of this paper is to proposes a forward search algorithm for detecting and identifying natural structures arising in human-computer interaction (HCI) and human…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to proposes a forward search algorithm for detecting and identifying natural structures arising in human-computer interaction (HCI) and human physiological response (HPR) data.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper portrays aspects that are essential to modelling and precision in detection. The methods involves developed algorithm for detecting outliers in data to recognise natural patterns in incessant data such as HCI-HPR data. The detected categorical data are simultaneously labelled based on the data reliance on parametric rules to predictive models used in classification algorithms. Data were also simulated based on multivariate normal distribution method and used to compare and validate the original data.

Findings

Results shows that the forward search method provides robust features that are capable of repelling over-fitting in physiological and eye movement data.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of the robust forward search algorithm is that when the number of digits for residuals value is more than the expected size for stack flow, it normally yields an error caution; to counter this, the data sets are normally standardized by taking the logarithmic function of the model before running the algorithm.

Practical implications

The authors conducted some of the experiments at individual residence which may affect environmental constraints.

Originality/value

The novel approach to this method is the detection of outliers for data sets based on the Mahalanobis distances on HCI and HPR. And can also involve a large size of data with p possible parameters. The improvement made to the algorithm is application of more graphical display and rendering of the residual plot.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Lei Li, Qingyun Huang, KwanHo Yeung and Zhaoquan Jian

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of human-computer interaction (HCI) on customers’ perceived electronic service (e-service) value and the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of human-computer interaction (HCI) on customers’ perceived electronic service (e-service) value and the mediating role of task-technology fit (TTF) in that effect.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a model based on service-dominant logic (SDL) and TTF theory, and validates it using a hierarchical regression with the data collected from 634 online banking customers in Guangdong Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China.

Findings

The findings reveal that HCI in e-service contexts comprises five components. Three fundamental components (i.e. technology functionality, customer technology readiness and task routine) contribute to value co-creation. Two core components (i.e. interaction between customer technology readiness and technology functionality, and interaction between task routine and technology functionality) are inhibitors, but the inhibitory effect of the former is only significant in the Guangdong sample. TTF takes a mediating role in these relationships, but the mediating effect of the former core component is only significant in the Guangdong sample.

Originality/value

This paper explains two basic questions about the trigger points of value co-creation in e-service contexts (i.e. what their operational definitions are and how to measure them) and unlocks the “black box” of value co-creation by taking TTF as a mediator. SDL and TTF theory are extended. The paper provides suggestions for how practitioners can efficiently advance value co-creation with customers.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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