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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

LEONARD CHAFFEE, DONALD J. McCARTY, HARRY RANDLES and FRANCIS M. TRUSTY

The State University of New York at Buffalo, Cornell University, The University of Rochester, and Syracuse University joined forces with Ford Foundation support to provide…

Abstract

The State University of New York at Buffalo, Cornell University, The University of Rochester, and Syracuse University joined forces with Ford Foundation support to provide a summer experience for administrative interns. The program's central focus was the development of educational leaders. Interns from each of the four universities were brought to Cornell University. Interns and professors from each university in the program were viewed as a social system, providing an opportunity for participants to diagnose their own social behavior. Two factors contributed to the process: the creation of an “open” climate to foster inquiry and a high degree of cooperation among staff and interns. The first two weeks of the summer experience were devoted to sensitivity training which accomplished several related objectives: more accurate perceptions of self; increased accuracy in perceiving the effect and affect of one's behavior on others; greater understanding of interaction between groups and inductively derived understanding of social and behavioral theories. An instrument for evaluation was prepared by the interns. Among the “high points” they identified, two items were most frequently and about evenly mentioned: sensitivity training and day‐to‐day relationships. The reactions of the interns as a whole was an affirmation of the experience as a meaningful contribution to their personal and professional growth.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Paul Louie Fletcher SR

Presents, at some length, the story of the writer’s father, sharing the history and experiences of a generation who prospered in the Chinese laundry industry. Chronicles…

Abstract

Presents, at some length, the story of the writer’s father, sharing the history and experiences of a generation who prospered in the Chinese laundry industry. Chronicles the introduction of the wholesale shirt laundry, presenting new innovations and ideas and branching out into new regulated businesses in other fields, showing how emerging problems were tackled and overcome. Cites that most of the information is from memory, observation, letters and manuals. Considers the development and changes in the industry from 1930 to 1970, looking also at the accompanying changes in standards of living.

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Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Chaminda Senaratne and Catherine L. Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of organisational ambidexterity, and identify drivers of and barriers to ambidexterity in the high-tech small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of organisational ambidexterity, and identify drivers of and barriers to ambidexterity in the high-tech small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the UK, using fine-grained qualitative evidence. This is much needed to generate insights on how organisational ambidexterity actually takes place in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is exploratory in nature, based on qualitative in-depth interview data collected from 20 UK high-tech SMEs in five industries.

Findings

The results reveal that SMEs leverage resources through intra-firm and inter-firm collaborations to pursue ambidexterity sequentially or simultaneously, using a range of drivers and overcoming a range of barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The data were gathered from a single informant from each firm. Therefore, more in-depth, longitudinal, qualitative research using multiple sources of data may be required to develop deeper insights into ambidexterity.

Practical implications

Managers of high-tech SMEs need to focus on specific barriers to ambidexterity and devise effective mechanisms to promote the drivers of ambidexterity. The mechanisms to achieve ambidexterity as identified in this study will benefit high-tech SMEs in particular, and firms in general.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the understanding of organisational ambidexterity in high-tech SMEs by exploring the mechanisms through which SMEs implement organisational ambidexterity despite their resource constraints. This counteracts the conventional view that it is difficult for SMEs to pursue ambidexterity.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2003

Judith Randle

Drawing from televised debates over capital punishment on CNN’s Crossfire from February 2000 to June 2002, I argue that Teles’s (1998) theory of “dissensus politics” is…

Abstract

Drawing from televised debates over capital punishment on CNN’s Crossfire from February 2000 to June 2002, I argue that Teles’s (1998) theory of “dissensus politics” is useful in understanding the U.S.’s preservation of capital punishment as well as current divisions in death penalty sentiment within the U.S. I pose the retention of capital punishment as the product of rival elites who are unwilling to forsake capital punishment’s moral character (and often the political benefits it offers), and who consequently ignore an American public that appears to have reached a measured consensus of doubt about the death penalty.

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Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-032-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1959

The first Report of the Radiobiological Laboratory of the Agricultural Research Council (reviewed in the August issue of the B.F.J.) reveals something of the comprehensive…

Abstract

The first Report of the Radiobiological Laboratory of the Agricultural Research Council (reviewed in the August issue of the B.F.J.) reveals something of the comprehensive monitoring system for radioactive fission products in the human diet, animal products, pasturage and crops, and the soil. The Report contained the results of a survey of Strontium 90 in the human diet in this country. The survey is continuing into radioactive pollution of food. The service will be available for “accidents” at the gradually increasing number of atomic plants and doubtless it will be extended to cover imported foods, that is at the port of entry, since these may come from countries with higher levels from fall‐outs than in the U.K. Such a service is a public health necessity in any country even though present levels are generally insignificant in relation to the Medical Research Council's recommendations for maximum allowable concentrations. These levels, at which the M.R.C. say action would be required, were doubtless fixed with wide safety margins before definite danger levels would be approached and as maximum allowable concentrations are unlikely to be reached in the peace‐time uses of nuclear energy, including present rates of testing nuclear weapons, except in areas adjacent to possible “accidents” at nuclear plants, perhaps our fears of danger to health from radiation are exaggerated. Possible war‐time levels are another matter; these are unpredictable; unthinkable. There are fairly large areas in different parts of the world, extremely rich in radio‐active materials; where the indigenous population has, as long as it has been settled there, received many times the dose to which the population of the remainder of the earth have so far been exposed. These people in a few areas have been studied; they appear to suffer no ill effects and are as healthy and fertile as those who do not live on radio‐active earth.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 61 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1951

The disturbed national and international atmosphere during 1950 has not been without its effects on the affairs of the Association. Printing disputes have frequently…

Abstract

The disturbed national and international atmosphere during 1950 has not been without its effects on the affairs of the Association. Printing disputes have frequently delayed the appearance of Aslib publications and the scarcity of labour has made staff recruitment difficult. Notwithstanding these and other factors, the Council looks back on 1950 as a notable milestone in Aslib's history.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Hanmo Jeong

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the introduction of new technologies has affected student support at the United Kingdom Open University (UKOU) particularly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the introduction of new technologies has affected student support at the United Kingdom Open University (UKOU) particularly focusing on face-to-face tutorials and online tutorials, what this impact implies for open universities and in what direction the innovations toward the sustainability of open universities should proceed.

Design/methodology/approach

Research on the historical development of UKOU and a literature review was conducted.

Findings

The rationale behind the foundation of UKOU has been to provide higher education to those who have time and physical constraints. There is no doubt that the introduction of advanced technologies has played a significant role in the growth of the university. However, when the university attempted to replace face-to-face tutorials with online tutorials on the basis of its purpose, a number of students and faculty members opposed the decision even though online tutorials fit within its original objective. This paper suggests that face-to-face tutorials have become the essence of the university through the process of identifying the university in the past and the university’s identity may need to be distinguished from the rationale.

Originality/value

This paper emphasizes the necessity of rethinking the Open and Distance Education rationale and, on the basis of past studies on UKOU, offers a unique perspective about the changes that have taken place at the university.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2414-6994

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Abstract

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Research in Rural Sociology and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-028-9

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Jamie Lewis and Andrew Bartlett

The chapter sketches out a putative ethnography of Bigfooting, detailing what we can study from analysing television programmes of the practice, but also what we lose by…

Abstract

The chapter sketches out a putative ethnography of Bigfooting, detailing what we can study from analysing television programmes of the practice, but also what we lose by not being there, by not embedding ourselves in the Bigfooting community, and by not participating in their woodland expeditions.

Details

The Lost Ethnographies: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-773-7

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