Search results

1 – 10 of 23
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2002

R. E. Bell

Comments on the use of the term “predicate offence”, which is American in origin but has crept into common UK and wider usage; it can be confusing. Traces the origin of…

Downloads
601

Abstract

Comments on the use of the term “predicate offence”, which is American in origin but has crept into common UK and wider usage; it can be confusing. Traces the origin of the term: a predicate offence is the underlying criminal offence that gave rise to criminal proceeds which are the subject of a money laundering charge; the concept is important in the USA because prosecution for money laundering requires proof that the property involved was proceeds of “specified unlawful activity”. Argues that in the UK since the passage of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, the term is redundant; there was a previous distinction between laundering the proceeds of drug trafficking and of other crimes, but has now been removed, so that if the jury can be reasonably sure that the property was derived from criminal conduct and that the defendant suspected this, they can still convict without knowing what particular offence was committed. Discusses also the question of whether tax offences are predicates for money laundering.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Rashedul Hasan, Sivakumar Velayutham and Abu Faisal Khan

COVID-19 has disrupted the economic development of both advanced and emerging markets. In addition to the stimulus packages to adjust the economic shock from COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 has disrupted the economic development of both advanced and emerging markets. In addition to the stimulus packages to adjust the economic shock from COVID-19, regulators around the world are searching for innovative mechanisms to rebuild the economy. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of SRI Sukuk to serve as an Islamic social finance solution for development projects to mitigate the adverse economic effects of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a mixed-method research framework. The authors use a systematic literature review following the recommendations of Bowen (2009) to identify critical challenges financing PPP projects using SRI Sukuk. In the next phase, the authors interview participants involved in an SRI Sukuk financed PPP project to get more significant insights on the challenges identified through the literature review process.

Findings

The authors identify the need for greater transparency for SRI financed PPP projects. Also, organisational and legislative challenges are limiting the attractiveness of SRI Sukuk as a financing mechanisms for post-COVID development projects.

Practical implications

SRI Sukuk is an emerging financing concept, and the use of such an Islamic financial instrument in financing development projects can serve as a viable alternative for policymakers in a post-COVID economic environment.

Social implications

The successful completion of the development projects integrating the concept of Social Maslahah through SRI Sukuk in Malaysia could encourage other emerging economies to use such innovative Islamic financial instrument for economic development in post-COVID environment.

Originality/value

This paper is unique, as it provides evidence on the potential of SRI Sukuk to finance large scale public-private partnership projects.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Sujata Mukherjee and Rajat Jyoti Sarkar

Knowledge capital formation through investment in education has been at the center of the recent economic planning and management. Increase in labor productivity and…

Abstract

Knowledge capital formation through investment in education has been at the center of the recent economic planning and management. Increase in labor productivity and technological innovation is the outcome of Research and Development (R&D) which is a part of the higher education system of a country. Therefore, to achieve long-run sustainable growth, an economy should dynamize its higher education framework along with strengthening the primary and secondary education to reflect the changing realities. The study examines the interplay between the percentage of educational expenditure in total expenditure and per capita net state domestic product (NSDP) of eight selected metro city states of India during the period 2005–2006 to 2015–2016. The result shows strong positive impact of educational expenditure on per capita NSDP. Therefore, the study suggests to increase the percentage share of educational expenditure in total expenditure.

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Kate Lase and Biruta Sloka

Recent development of internet applications and increase in application of various information technology have supported growing demand for new skills related to ICT and…

Abstract

Recent development of internet applications and increase in application of various information technology have supported growing demand for new skills related to ICT and internet use, computer literacy and technical digital skills. New technologies have changed many aspects of life and have led to significant differences in digital skills, computer literacy, ICT and internet use along the usual dimensions of social inequality. Purpose of the study is to analyze main challenges and problems of digital inequalities in households in Latvia by regions, territories and income and level of education. Design/Methodology/Approach: This chapter analyzes scientific publication and previous conducted research results and data of Digital Economy and Society Index, Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia (2019) data and Eurostat. Data are analyzed using indicators of descriptive statistics (indicators of central tendency or location – arithmetic mean, mode and median), indicators of variability (indicators of dispersion – range, standard deviation and standard error of mean), cross-tabulations by region, territories, income and level of education and analysis of variance are used. Findings: The results of analysis indicated that there are differences between rural and urban Internet access, socioeconomic differences between people with different income and education that affects their ability to access the Internet and digital skills. Practical implications: Latvia would benefit from motivating life-long learning, investing on digital technology and raise awareness of the importance of digitization. Originality/value: The results of this chapter can provide valuable pointers for decision-makers how to improve digital skills and digitalization process in regions of Latvia and how digital inequality can be reduced.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Social Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-931-3

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Amir Moradi-Motlagh, Christine Jubb and Keith Houghton

Facing budgetary challenges, successive Australian Governments have chosen to proportionally reduce public expenditure on universities relative to levels of activity in…

Abstract

Purpose

Facing budgetary challenges, successive Australian Governments have chosen to proportionally reduce public expenditure on universities relative to levels of activity in both teaching and research. The question asked in this paper is whether Australia’s universities increased their efficiency in a manner consistent with the demands of government to provide productivity “dividends” or efficiencies?

Design/methodology/approach

Using archival data for 37 Australian universities from 2007 to 2013, this paper examines changes in productivity of university groups and individual institutions using the data envelopment analysis technique.

Findings

Results show a statistically significant system-wide (or technological) productivity improvement of 15.2 per cent from 2007 to 2013, but there was little average individual institutional change in efficiency. Productivity improvements were clearly observable for the Group of 8 institutions with an improvement of 25.1 per cent.

Research limitations/implications

Universities, like other public sector bodies, can both improve individually and as an overall system. The system has improved greatly in terms of productivity at higher levels than may be anticipated.

Originality/value

Using data contemporaneous with a period of great change in university funding and sector competition, this study reveals how some universities benefited, whereas others struggled to maintain their relative position.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Tarran Haskey Macmillan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of hospital discharge on the wider wellbeing of older people, drawing out implications this can have on mental health.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of hospital discharge on the wider wellbeing of older people, drawing out implications this can have on mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on research from the Healthwatch England Special Inquiry into hospital discharge. The paper focuses on the experiences of 1,300 older people, with the majority of the research being undertaken by the local Healthwatch network. The 58 local Healthwatch who submitted evidence on the experiences of older people as part of the inquiry were autonomous in how they were able to carry out the research, with results being analysed through use of a qualitative framework.

Findings

Older people often felt they were not ready for discharge due to not feeling involved in planning of their discharge, being discharged without the information they need and having difficulties accessing aftercare support. This paper examines the impact these issues can have on the mental health and wellbeing of older people, their carers and specifically patients with dementia both during and after discharge from hospital. Through examination of these issues the discharge process can be viewed from the perspective of the individual, and start to conceptualise where the hospital discharge process could further support older people’s mental health and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines these issues in detail through case studies collected regarding older people, and exposes the impact poor discharge can have on physical and mental wellbeing for older patients. The paper presents a number of issues which have implications for policy and practice in both health and social care, and the integration of the two services.

Originality/value

This is the first Special Inquiry conducted by Healthwatch England in conjunction with the local Healthwatch network and presents a large scale piece of research led by the experiences of older people.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Ferdi Celikay and Erdal Gumus

The purpose of this paper is to provide new empirical evidence on the relationship between social expenditure and poverty in Turkey.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide new empirical evidence on the relationship between social expenditure and poverty in Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

There are voluminous studies in the literature and many of which contain condradictory results. The authors use panel error correction models and employ Turkish statistical territorial units data (26 regions) covering the period 2004-2011 in the analysis.

Findings

The authors have found that in the short run, there is a negative relationship between social expenditure and poverty, as expected. In the long run, however, there exists a positive relation between them. The authors utilize expenditure on education as one component of social expenditure, and the authors obtain a negative relationship between education expenditure and poverty, both in the short run and in the long run.

Social implications

Poverty is an important social problem that more studies on this subject should examine various aspects and find policies to alleviate it.

Originality/value

Literature on poverty and social spending are growing and their results are contradictory. However, this paper clearly and significantly provides new empirical evidence on the effect of social spending on reducing poverty using Turkish data. This kind of study is hardly found for developing countries like Turkey. It contributes to the literature.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Bel G. Raggad

Examines the effects of decision unstructuralness (unstructuredness + noisiness) on decision‐support systems (DSS) adoption. Suggests that end‐users are sensitive to…

Downloads
1357

Abstract

Examines the effects of decision unstructuralness (unstructuredness + noisiness) on decision‐support systems (DSS) adoption. Suggests that end‐users are sensitive to “unstructuralness” when they select a decision support approach. Problem structuring at the intelligence phase generates the first signal about DSS usefulness. If this signal is in favour of DSS, the manager either immediately adopts the DSS, or performs problem solving at the design phase. At this phase a new signal will be generated thus, confirming or denying DSS usefulness. This confirms that problem structuring prevails in making the DSS adoption decision. That is, in making the DSS adoption decision, priority is given to problem structuring in the intelligence phase.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 96 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Ferdi Celikay and Mehmet Sengur

This study aims to examine the relationship between public sector education expenditure and the GINI coefficient as a measure of injustice in income distribution.

Downloads
547

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between public sector education expenditure and the GINI coefficient as a measure of injustice in income distribution.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 31 European countries gathered from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed using panel error correction models.

Findings

According to the study’s findings, a relationship between education expenditures and the GINI coefficient exists. There is a 1 per cent increase for the European countries examined in this study in their rate of education expenditure in gross domestic product (GDP), which raises the GINI coefficient by 0.20 per cent in the short-term and decreases it by 0.22 per cent in the long-term, as expected. Thus, an increase in the proportion of education expenditures in GDP affects the GINI coefficient in a statistically significant, negative way over the long-term.

Originality/value

This study fills a gap in the literature by determining whether the interaction between education expenditure and GINI coefficient changes in the short- and long-term. The results show that education expenditure generates positive results particularly by lowering income inequality in the long-term. This interaction can be more clearly observed in developing countries. So this conclusion adds an important empirical evidence to the literature and it may contribute in forming policies toward reducing income inequality.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Francesco Pastore, Claudio Quintano and Antonella Rocca

The Italian school-to-work transition (STWT) is astonishingly slow and long in comparison to the other EU countries. We analyze its determinants comparing the Italian case…

Abstract

Purpose

The Italian school-to-work transition (STWT) is astonishingly slow and long in comparison to the other EU countries. We analyze its determinants comparing the Italian case with Austria, Poland and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a Cox survival model with proportional hazard. The smoothed hazard estimates allow us to identify the nonlinear path of the hazard function.

Findings

The authors reckon that the actual length of the transition to a stable job is around 30 months in Italy. Conversely, it is less than one year in the other countries. Women are particularly penalized, despite being on average more educated than men. Tertiary or vocational education at high secondary school strongly increases the hazard rate to a regular job. The smoothed hazard estimates suggest positive duration dependence at the beginning of the transition and slightly negative thereafter.

Practical implications

Stimulating economic growth and investing in education and training are important pre-conditions for shortening the transition.

Originality/value

Despite the duration of the STWT is one of the most important indicators to measure the efficiency of the STWT, it is not easy to measure. The authors build on their previous research work on this topic, but relaxing the assumption of a monotonic hazard rate and using the flexible baseline hazard approach to test for the existence of nonlinear duration dependence. Furthermore, they extend the analysis by including student-workers who attended a vocational path of education, in order to detect its effectiveness in allowing young people finding a job sooner.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

1 – 10 of 23