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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

M.J. Barrow and H.M. Loughlin

A case study of efforts by one company in the food industry totransform itself into a “learning organization” in the faceof a rapidly changing and challenging competitive…

Abstract

A case study of efforts by one company in the food industry to transform itself into a “learning organization” in the face of a rapidly changing and challenging competitive environment. Develops a rationale for the “learning organization” in terms of the need for a new type of personnel (higher education, able to learn, to work without supervision, to solve problems and with good interpersonal skills) and a new type of leadership. A second part (next issue of this journal) will detail the actual training interventions.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

M.J. Barrow and H.M. Loughlin

The concluding article of two parts, which observes a culturechange project – The Learning Edge – developed at GrandMetropolitan Foods Europe and discusses the training…

Abstract

The concluding article of two parts, which observes a culture change project – The Learning Edge – developed at Grand Metropolitan Foods Europe and discusses the training interventions involved. Describes the Learning Wheel – which allows employees to enter at any particular stage – and also the courses which involve line managers. The latter have four different courses; Leadership and Counselling Skills being the last two, preceded by Development Workshop and Manager as Coach, which develop complementary effects from differing skills and qualifications. Women in clerical grades were introduced to the “Springboard” programme to give impetus to self‐development and to enable full potential to be acquired. The benefits are starting to accrue in various areas, though only time will tell (three to five years is the prediction). Concludes that only with change from knowledge, constant reviews and flexibility can organizations continue to prosper and grow.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Gordon Wills

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplacelearning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates whatit has already achieved and from this…

Abstract

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplace learning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates what it has already achieved and from this moves on to realize its full potential – in short, the enterprise itself is the key. Examines in successive chapters: the individual manager and questioning insights (Q); the major systems which the enterprise uses to capture and structure its learning; a SWOT analysis of the enterprise′s total learning; action learning, its contribution to the achievement of enterprise growth, and the role of programmed knowledge (P); the Enterprise School of Management (ESM) as a phoenix of enlightenment and effectiveness rising from the ashes of traditional, less effective management training initiatives; and, finally, the practical realization of the action learning dream, as evidenced by emerging examples of successful and profitable implementation worldwide. Concludes with a selection of pertinent abstracts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Personnel Review is split into 8 sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Career/Manpower Planning and…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Personnel Review is split into 8 sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Career/Manpower Planning and Recruitment; Health and Safety; Industrial Relations and Participation; Pay, Incentives and Pensions; Performance, Productivity and Motivation; Redundancy and Dismissal; Work Patterns; and Training and Development.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

In this special abtracts edition of the Journal of European Industrial Training, material has been selected from a wide range of international journals which form part of…

Abstract

In this special abtracts edition of the Journal of European Industrial Training, material has been selected from a wide range of international journals which form part of the Andar coverage list. Such an editon provides an ideal forum to expose industrial trainers to a wide variety of relevant articles, some from journals with which there may be familiarity, others, the RSA Journal for example, which may be less well known, but on occasion provide quality, pertinent information, of interest to those involed in industrial training.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Michael J. Morley and Thomas N. Garavan

Examines current themes in organizational design which permeate theextant literature and highlights possible implications for humanresource development (HRD). Highlights…

3343

Abstract

Examines current themes in organizational design which permeate the extant literature and highlights possible implications for human resource development (HRD). Highlights key factors forcing change and innovation in organization design, namely competition, the need for flexibility and the ability to meet the demands of the new knowledge workforce. Presents and evaluates organizational responses in the form of TQM, employee empowerment, structural de‐layering, competitive cultures and high performance work design. Finally, discusses possible implications for HRD and the HRD specialist, emphasizing the need for a rethink of the nature of learning in organizations.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 19 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Russel Mhundwa and Michael Simon

This paper aims to show that a simplified surface fitting model can be efficient in determining the energy consumption during milk cooling by an on-farm direct expansion…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show that a simplified surface fitting model can be efficient in determining the energy consumption during milk cooling by an on-farm direct expansion bulk milk cooler (DXBMC). The study reveals that milk volume and the temperature gradient between the room and the final milk temperature can effectively be used for predicting the energy consumption within 95% confidence bounds.

Design/methodology/approach

A data acquisition system comprised a Landis and Gyr E650 power meter, TMC6-HE temperature sensors, and HOBO UX120-006M 4-channel analog data logger was designed and built for monitoring of the DXBMC. The room temperature where the DXBMC is housed was measured using a TMC6-HE temperature sensor, connected to a Hobo UX120-006M four-channel analog data logger which was configured to log at one-minute intervals. The electrical energy consumed by the DXBMC was measured using a Landis and Gyr E650 meter while the volume of milk was extracted from on the farm records.

Findings

The results showed that the developed model can predict the electrical energy consumption of the DXBMC within an acceptable accuracy since 80% of the variation in the electrical energy consumption by the DXBMC was explained by the mathematical model. Also, milk volume and the temperature gradient between the room and final milk temperature in the BMC are primary and secondary contributors, respectively, to electrical energy consumption by the DXBMC. Based on the system that has been monitored the findings reveal that the DXBMC was operating within the expected efficiency level as evidenced by the optimized electrical energy consumption (EEC) closely mirroring the modelled EEC with a determination coefficient of 0.95.

Research limitations/implications

Only one system was monitored due to unavailability of funding to deploy several data acquisition systems across the country. The milk blending temperatures, effects of the insulation of the DXBMC, were not taken into account in this study.

Practical implications

The developed model is simple to use, cost effective and can be applied in real-time on the dairy farm which will enable the farmer to quickly identify an increase in the cooling energy per unit of milk cooled.

Social implications

The developed easy to use model can be used by dairy farmers on similar on-farm DXBMC; hence, they can devise ways to manage their energy consumption on the farm during the cooling of milk and foster some energy efficiency initiatives.

Originality/value

The implementation of the developed model can be useful to dairy farmers in South Africa. Through energy optimization, the maintenance of the DXBMC can be determined and scheduled accordingly.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Cara-Lynn Scheuer and Catherine Loughlin

Acknowledging that only examining the main effects of diversity may be limiting, the authors explore integrating van Knippenberg et al.'s (2004) categorization–elaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

Acknowledging that only examining the main effects of diversity may be limiting, the authors explore integrating van Knippenberg et al.'s (2004) categorization–elaboration model (CEM) of workgroup diversity as a linchpin in the relationship between empowering leadership and performance in age-diverse work groups. While prior research has focused almost exclusively on the impact of transformational leadership in diverse contexts, few studies have found the positive effects of transformational leadership to be diminished in certain age-diverse contexts. Consequently, the authors investigate whether empowering leadership may be a better approach in this context due to its emphasis on accommodating and participative behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data gathered from work group members across a wide array of industries (N = 214), the authors test for the moderating effects of empowering leadership on the relationship between age diversity and work group performance and its indirect relationship via information elaboration (while controlling for transformational leadership).

Findings

Empowering leadership positively moderated the direct relationship between age diversity and work group performance and the indirect relationship via information elaboration, whereas transformational leadership had the opposite effect. “Coaching” and “showing concern/interacting with the team” drove the positive effects of empowering leadership, and “personal recognition” and “intellectual stimulation” predicted the negative effects of transformational leadership.

Practical implications

This research offers insights into how managers can lead age-diverse work groups more effectively (i.e. by utilizing an empowering as opposed to a transformational leadership approach, with a particular emphasis on “coaching” and “showing concern/interacting with the team” behaviors).

Originality/value

The study identifies an “alternative” moderating contingency to the age diversity–performance relationship (empowering leadership).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Jaron Harvey, Mark C. Bolino and Thomas K. Kelemen

For decades organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, generating a significant amount of research exploring the…

Abstract

For decades organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, generating a significant amount of research exploring the concept of what citizenship behavior is, and its antecedents, correlates, and consequences. While these behaviors have been and will continue to be valuable, there are changes in the workplace that have the potential to alter what types of OCBs will remain important for organizations in the future, as well as what types of opportunities for OCB exist for employees. In this chapter we consider the influence of 10 workplace trends related to human resource management that have the potential to influence both what types of citizenship behaviors employees engage in and how often they may engage in them. We build on these 10 trends that others have identified as having the potential to shape the workplace of the future, which include labor shortages, globalization, immigration, knowledge-based workers, increase use of technology, gig work, diversity, changing work values, the skills gap, and employer brands. Based on these 10 trends, we develop propositions about how each trend may impact OCB. We consider not only how these trends will influence the types of citizenship and opportunities for citizenship that employees can engage in, but also how they may shape the experiences of others related to OCB, including organizations and managers.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Eddy S. Ng and Emma Parry

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers…

Abstract

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) working side-by-side for the first time. However, it is unclear how multiple generations of workers interact with each other and affect the workplace. Although there is extant literature on generational differences, some scholars have argued that the effect sizes are small and the differences are not meaningful. The focal aim of this chapter is to present the current state of literature on generational research. We present the relevant conceptualizations and theoretical frameworks that establish generational research. We then review evidence from existing research studies to establish the areas of differences that may exist among the different generations. In our review, we identify the issues arising from generational differences that are relevant to human resource management (HRM) practices, including new workforce entrants, aging workers, the changing nature of work and organizations, and leadership development. We conclude with several directions for future research on modernizing workplace policies and practices, ensuring sustainability in current employment models, facilitating future empirical research, and integrating the effects of globalization in generational research.

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