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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

P. Vuylsteke, P. Defraeye, J. Van Daele, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

Recognition of plane objects can be achieved by calculating the area and first and second moments of the object. In the work described a hardwired videoprocessor linked to…

Abstract

Recognition of plane objects can be achieved by calculating the area and first and second moments of the object. In the work described a hardwired videoprocessor linked to a 16‐bit microprocessor enables the recognition to be achieved within 30 milliseconds.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

L. Vanderheydt, P. Vuylsteke, P. Jansen, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

The Pattern Recognition and Image Processing group of the Leuven University is engaged in medical as well as in industrial projects. This paper is Part I of an overview of…

Abstract

The Pattern Recognition and Image Processing group of the Leuven University is engaged in medical as well as in industrial projects. This paper is Part I of an overview of some of the industrial applications.

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Sensor Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

L. Vanderheydt, P. Vuylsteke, P. Jansen, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

This paper is part II of an overview of the work of the Pattern and Image Processing group of the Leuven University, presenting some of the industrial applications.

Abstract

This paper is part II of an overview of the work of the Pattern and Image Processing group of the Leuven University, presenting some of the industrial applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Eugenia Smyrnova-Trybulska, Nataliia Morze, Olena Kuzminska and Piet Kommers

This paper aims to describe the popular trends and methods and ICT tools used for mapping and visualization of scientific domains as a research methodology which is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the popular trends and methods and ICT tools used for mapping and visualization of scientific domains as a research methodology which is attracting more and more interest from scientific information and science studies professionals. Science mapping or bibliometric mapping is a spatial representation of how disciplines, fields, specialties and individual documents or authors. The researchers analysed Bibexel, Pajek, VOSViewer, programmes used for processing and visualization of bibliographic and bibliometric data, within the framework of the implementation of IRNet research network project and activities and presented several examples of visualisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Among the main indicators of research effectiveness – bibliometric indicators – is a powerful information tool to support the development of science. Practical research methods were prepared using the programs: Bibexel (metadata analyses), program Pajek: graph editing and visualization of the graph structure of co-authorship – using the method of Kamada-Kawai and VOSviewer: a computer program for creating maps based on network data and for visualizing and exploring these maps. The main features of VOSviewer can be summarized for creating maps based on network data, visualizing and exploring maps.

Findings

The cited references and keywords are used to analyse in particular the intellectual base used by the research field or to analyse documents that cite the same references.

Originality/value

The authors of the paper, who are researchers of the European IRNet project and international research network, described and analysed certain bibliographic results of these activities using methods of mapping and visualization of scientific domains.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Ernest Raiklin

The monograph argues that American racism has two colours (whiteand black), not one; and that each racism dresses itself not in oneclothing, but in four: (1) “Minimal”…

Abstract

The monograph argues that American racism has two colours (white and black), not one; and that each racism dresses itself not in one clothing, but in four: (1) “Minimal” negative, when one race considers another race inferior to itself in degree, but not in nature; (2) “Maximal” negative, when one race regards another as inherently inferior; (3) “Minimal” positive, when one race elevates another race to a superior status in degree, but not in nature; and (4) “Maximal” positive, when one race believes that the other race is genetically superior. The monograph maintains that the needs of capitalism created black slavery; that black slavery produced white racism as a justification for black slavery; and that black racism is a backlash of white racism. The monograph concludes that the abolition of black slavery and the civil rights movement destroyed the social and political ground for white and black racism, while the modern development of capitalism is demolishing their economic and intellectual ground.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Maarten Vansteenkiste, Nathalie Aelterman, Leen Haerens and Bart Soenens

Given the complexity of societal, technological, and economic challenges encountered by schools and teachers, one may wonder whether and how teachers can still optimally…

Abstract

Given the complexity of societal, technological, and economic challenges encountered by schools and teachers, one may wonder whether and how teachers can still optimally motivate their students. To adopt a motivating role in today’s ever-changing, even stormy, educational landscape, teachers need more than a checklist of motivating practices. They also need a fundamental theoretical perspective that can serve as a general source of inspiration for their everyday classroom practices across various situations and in interaction with different students. Herein, we argue that self-determination theory represents such a valuable perspective. In Part I, we discuss the satisfaction of learners’ psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness as a source of student motivation, engagement, and resilience. We also present a recently developed circular model involving a broad variety of motivating (i.e., need-supportive) and demotivating (i.e., need-thwarting) teaching practices appealing to these three needs. In Part II, we discuss several implications of this circular model, thereby discussing the diverse pathways that lead to student need satisfaction, motivation, and engagement as well as highlighting teachers’ capacity for calibration to deal with uncertainty and change. We conclude that school principals and teachers do well to invest in both students’ and teachers’ psychological need experiences, such that they become skilled in flexibly adjusting themselves to diversity, uncertainty, and change.

Details

Motivation in Education at a Time of Global Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-613-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Jafar Jafari

Fieldwork is one of the hallmarks of anthropology. Almost all students of anthropology have geographical and cultural specializations, ranging from a small group to a…

Abstract

Fieldwork is one of the hallmarks of anthropology. Almost all students of anthropology have geographical and cultural specializations, ranging from a small group to a nation. Their interest areas are often identified or marked by real or putative boundaries; and it is within these boundaries that anthropologists have “founded” their own villages and tribes — “my village”, “my tribe.”

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Birger Stichelbaut, Gertjan Plets and Keir Reeves

Over a century of state-sponsored construction of monuments, historic mythmaking and nationalist framings of WWI has ensured that it has become notoriously difficult to…

Abstract

Purpose

Over a century of state-sponsored construction of monuments, historic mythmaking and nationalist framings of WWI has ensured that it has become notoriously difficult to present the heritage of the Great War in an inclusive and non-selective way. In this paper the authors present a strategy and technology-driven solutions to overcome the selective heritage curation of modern conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on a suite of tools, applications and cultural heritage management plans developed by the In Flanders Fields Museum (IFFM), this paper explores the challenges of preserving and curating conflict heritage. The authors investigate the philosophy, cultural heritage management strategies and exhibitions used to curate the heritage of the Ypres Salient (Belgium).

Findings

The paper argues that historical aerial photographs integrated in multimedia exhibits present themselves as a fascinating source bringing the landscape within the walls of the museum. Mobile augmented reality (AR) applications developed by the museum go one step beyond and bring museum techniques to the landscape.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents a strategy to present, manage and curate the entirety of conflict heritage from the modern period. Faced with growing politicisation and memorialisation of modern conflict, it is extremely important that inclusive heritage management and curation is insured. The reflections on different curatorial techniques used by the IFFM can contribute globally towards a better heritage engagement.

Practical implications

An innovative and meaningful framework enables a more historically nuanced visitor experience to key heritage sites throughout the Ypres Salient.

Social implications

Ensuring a non-selective heritage experience is especially pressing today. Over the past century canonised and national narratives have prescribed our understanding of the First World War across Europe and beyond.

Originality/value

Adopting a critical stance towards the proliferation in AR apps and applying theories from anthropology and phenomenology has been developed combining AR with arboreal landscape relics.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2021

Jacques Bellavance, Morin Diane and Catherine Mello

The behavioral phenotype of fragile X syndrome (FXS) and intellectual disability (ID) proposed by Hagerman et al. (2009) was primarily based on data from male children and…

Abstract

Purpose

The behavioral phenotype of fragile X syndrome (FXS) and intellectual disability (ID) proposed by Hagerman et al. (2009) was primarily based on data from male children and teens. The purpose of this study was to promote a better understanding of how this condition manifests in adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 18 men of FXS were paired with men with Down syndrome on the basis of age and level of ID. A screening checklist was created on the basis of existing scales and the Hagerman et al. (2009) behavioral phenotype and completed by care providers.

Findings

Five of the 12 features of the phenotype were significantly more present among men with FXS than in men with Down syndrome.

Originality/value

This study provides partial confirmation for Hagerman et al.’s (2009) behavioral phenotype of FXS among men with moderate ID and identified some traits that warrant further investigation.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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