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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1949

H. SCHURER

THE list given below is based on the selection presented in Dr. Joris Vorstius's Ergebnisse und Fortschritte der Bibliographie in Deutschland seit dem ersten Weltkrieg

Abstract

THE list given below is based on the selection presented in Dr. Joris Vorstius's Ergebnisse und Fortschritte der Bibliographie in Deutschland seit dem ersten Weltkrieg (Zentralblatt für Bibliothekswesen, Beiheft 74. Leipzig: Harrassowitz 1948, pp.v.172). Up to recently Dr. Vorstius was Director of the Öffentliche Wissenschaftliche Bibliothek in Berlin, the former Prussian State Library, and he has been the editor of the Zentralblatt since 1947. In addition to this survey of bibliographical work done in Germany, he has recently published a study of subject cataloguing in several of the large German learned libraries (Die Sachkatalogisierung in den wisseuschaftlichen Allgemeinbibliotlieken Deutschlands. Leipzig: Harrassowitz 1948, pp.viii.58) and a revised edition of his sketch of library history (Grundzüge der Bibliotheksgeschichte. Vierte, erweiterte Auflage. Leipzig: Harrassowitz 1948, pp.vii.114). In his survey of German bibliography Dr. Vorstius has aimed at making his selection in such a manner as to give a representative cross‐section of the bibliographies devoted to all important fields of scholarship. Works are listed according to their significance irrespective of the form in which they were issued, as monographs, appendixes to books, or contributions to serials. As the book is not likely to come the way of many British librarians, it has been thought useful to give a tabulated survey of bibliographical work done in Germany during the war years covering the period when there was least cultural contact between Germany and England. While thus cutting off a good slice at the beginning of the period covered by Dr. Vorstius's book, I have been able to extend the time range to include the post‐war period. When Dr. Vorstius surveyed the field in 1947, German bibliographical activity had reached a nadir after declining steeply from the second half of the war onwards. For the whole of 1945 Dr. Vorstius lists one single bibliography, devoted to the literature on doves and pigeons. From this trough of the graph, a slightly ascending curve led to the compilation of the first three German post‐war bibliographies, all of them black lists of Nazi literature compiled for purge purposes. That was the only sign of any revival of bibliographic production Dr. Vorstius was able to record. Writing two years later I have been in a position to expand the post‐war component of the list considerably, at least, relatively speaking. Again, in a field where Germany could take a justified pride in her achievement, in the publication of the numerous current bibliographies, Dr. Vorstius's survey of the numerous Zentralblätter and Jahresberichte is a list of war casualties. All these publications had come to an end, most of them long before the end of the war. Dr. Vorstius's book only records the revival of two, the Deutsche National‐bibliographie and the Deutsche Literaturzeitung. Now the list is considerably longer. Considerations of space have prevented me from listing all the extinct current bibliographies with their dates of stoppage under their appropriate headings; I have limited myself to listing those which have been revived or started since the end of the war and those which were started (and in practically all cases came to a speedy end) during the war.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Drea Zigarmi and Taylor Peyton Roberts

This study aims to test the following three assertions underlying the Situational Leadership® II (SLII) Model: all four leadership styles are received by followers; all…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the following three assertions underlying the Situational Leadership® II (SLII) Model: all four leadership styles are received by followers; all four leadership styles are needed by followers; and if there is a fit between the leadership style a follower receives and needs, that follower will demonstrate favorable scores on outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

For the first and second assertions, a proportional breakdown of the four leadership styles observed within a sample of working professionals is presented and discussed. Regarding the third assertion, for ten outcome variables, multiple one-way analyses of variance tested mean differences between followers who experienced leadership style fit (i.e. a fit between received and needed style) and followers who did not experience fit (n = 573). Subscale scores from the Leader Action Profile, the Work Intention Inventory, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and an adapted form of the Affective/Cognitive trust scale (McAllister, 1995) were used as study measures.

Findings

Three of the four leadership styles of the SLII framework were reported as frequently received. All four of the leadership styles were reported as needed. This study also found that follower-reported fit between one’s needed and received leadership style at work resulted in more favorable scores on nine of the ten employee outcomes, as compared to follower-reported misfit.

Practical implications

As human resource development practitioners seek to educate and train their leaders on how to be more effective with their direct reports, this research provides evidence that all four styles are needed and received, although there were lower instances of reporting the S1 style to be needed or received. Also, the findings demonstrated that when followers view a fit exists between the leadership behaviors they need and the leadership behaviors they receive, greater positive job affect, lower negative job affect, increased cognitive and affective trust in the leader and higher levels of favorable employee work intentions were evident.

Originality/value

This paper builds on the resurgence of studies examining initiating structure and consideration as leader behaviors. This is one of very few recent studies that, by combining initiating structure and consideration, reinvestigates the four leadership styles established by past contingency theories. Specifically, the authors used the SLII framework as a foundation for analysis. Overall, the study supports three of the major assumptions of the SLII framework.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Uwe Peter Kanning and Nina Bergmann

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the best predictors of customer satisfaction by analysing and comparing the variables of two classical paradigms: the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the best predictors of customer satisfaction by analysing and comparing the variables of two classical paradigms: the confirmation/disconfirmation model; and Locke's model of general satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review and the development of a conceptual framework in which various problems in the two models are identified, the paper presents a field study that investigates the extent to which the satisfaction of customers of a bank can be explained by these models and by two modified models (regression design).

Findings

The study finds: that the inclusion of “importance” in Locke's model does not provide a better prediction of satisfaction than the variables of “performance” and “expectation” in the confirmation/disconfirmation model; that the absolute level of the expectation‐performance difference is a better predictor of customer satisfaction than the simple relative difference; and that “performance” is a much more reliable predictor of satisfaction than “expectation” and/or “importance”.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the specific setting of bank customers; it is uncertain whether the findings can be generalised to other fields.

Originality/value

The study provides an original critique and comparison of the classical models and identifies their limitations. The study also demonstrates that the absolute level of the expectation‐performance difference is a better prediction of customer satisfaction than the simple relative difference. The study shows that “performance” is the most powerful predictor of satisfaction and that it is therefore not necessary, in practice, to conduct a differentiated survey of other predictors.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Florence Y.Y. Ling, Zhe Zhang and Wei Ting Wong

This research investigates the dominant personality traits of construction project managers (PMs) and how their personality influences their management styles.

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the dominant personality traits of construction project managers (PMs) and how their personality influences their management styles.

Design/methodology/approach

An industry-wide survey with 70 PMs was conducted in Singapore. The survey data were subjected to inferential statistical tests. In-depth interviews were conducted with four subject matter experts.

Findings

Majority of the sample PMs are male with age, education level and experience well spread. The dominant personality traits of PMs are found to be: high in Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness and Openness and low in Neuroticism. PMs adopt “team leadership” style in which they place high emphasis on both the work that they need to complete and the people they lead. Their Agreeableness and Conscientiousness may improve over time.

Research limitations/implications

The correlations and regressions cannot prove causality.

Practical implications

It is discovered that PMs who have high conscientiousness and high openness personalities are more likely to be leaders who are concerned for both the people that they lead and production outcomes. The implication is that employers may wish to conduct personality tests at the time of hiring to ensure good job match.

Originality/value

This study is novel because it integrated two areas of knowledge – personality traits and management style. The regression analysis discovered that Openness and Conscientiousness traits may be used to predict PMs' management styles. This suggests that if personality tests are administered at hiring stage, the outcomes may be used to match potential hires to the jobs that they are being considered for.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Michael Polemis

We use disaggregated survey data set to investigate the impact of personality traits on the level of education in the USA. We attempt to shed light on the contribution of…

Abstract

Purpose

We use disaggregated survey data set to investigate the impact of personality traits on the level of education in the USA. We attempt to shed light on the contribution of each of the Big Five personality traits on the education decision made by the individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

We use the quantile regression analysis in order to investigate to what extent certain aspects of personality may help an individual to invest in education.

Findings

Our findings uncover a significant effect of noncognitive skills on the level of education. It is shown that people with high emotional stability and agreeableness invest in human capital, especially when we move to the higher quantiles of the conditional distribution function. Moreover, we argue that the estimated signs of the traits remain stable across the quantiles, while the relevant curvatures indicate for the first time in the empirical literature, the presence of nonlinear effects. Last, our model survived robustness checks under the inclusion of two aggregated higher-order factors, namely “Alpha” and “Beta.”

Research limitations/implications

Although we used several control variables (e.g. Gender, Age) to address the impact of noncognitive skills on education, special attention should be given to the use of additional socioeconomic indicators such as the skin color of participants, the urbanization rate, the level of unemployment, the level of income, parental education among others. These measures affect the causality driven by the inclusion of certain economic and demographic characteristics and minimize the endogeneity bias drawn from the inclusion of the sample variables. One additional limitation is that the survey-based data refer only to people with higher education (>13 years of study). Therefore, our empirical findings must be tested on a richer sample to capture the effect of personality traits on a broad spectrum of educational stages (e.g. early learning years, primary education, secondary education, etc.).

Originality/value

Our empirical findings add enough new insights to the existing literature. First, we attempt to assess the role of noncognitive skills proxied by the Big Five Inventory (hereafter “BFI”) on the education decision made by the individuals. Second, we provide fresh evidence of nonlinear effects between personality traits and education totally ignored by the existing literature. Our third contribution is to analyze the role of personality in enhancing the importance of investment in higher education as a determinant of individual behavior. In this way, we contribute to the growing field of behavioral economics since the study of noncognitive skills offers a range of new ideas and expanding research opportunities for social scientists (economists, psychologists, sociologists, etc.).

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Abstract

The prevalence and stability of marriage has declined in the United States as the economic lives of men and women have converged. Family change has not been uniform, however, and the widening gaps in marital status, relationship stability, and childbearing between socioeconomic groups raise concerns about child well-being in poor families and future inequality. This paper uses data from a recent cohort of young adults – Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health – to investigate whether disparities in cognitive ability and non-cognitive skills contribute to this gap. Blinder–Oaxaca decompositions of differences in key family outcomes across education groups show that, though individual non-cognitive traits are significantly associated with union status, relationship instability, and single motherhood, they collectively make no significant contribution to the explanation of educational gaps for almost all of these outcomes. Measured skills can explain as much as 25 percent of differences in these outcomes by family background (measured by mother’s education), but this effect disappears when own education is added to the model. Both cognitive and non-cognitive skills are strongly predictive of educational attainment but, conditional on education, explain very little of the socioeconomic gaps in family outcomes for young adults.

Details

Gender Convergence in the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-456-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Paula Fomby

Ambridge residents live with extended kin and non-family members much more often than the population of the United Kingdom as a whole. This chapter explores cultural…

Abstract

Ambridge residents live with extended kin and non-family members much more often than the population of the United Kingdom as a whole. This chapter explores cultural norms, economic need, and family and health care to explain patterns of coresidence in the village of Ambridge. In landed families, filial obligation and inheritance norms bind multigenerational families to a common dwelling, while scarcity of affordable rural housing inhibits residential independence and forces reliance on access to social networks and chance to find a home among the landless. Across the socioeconomic spectrum, coresidence wards off loneliness among unpartnered adults. Finally, for Archers listeners, extended kin and non-kin coresidence creates a private space where dialogue gives added dimensionality and depth to characters who would otherwise be known only through their interactions in public spaces.

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Monika Bansal and Surbhi Kapur

The study aims to review the existing theories and literature related to life skills education for adolescents to construct a model portraying the inter-relatedness…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to review the existing theories and literature related to life skills education for adolescents to construct a model portraying the inter-relatedness between these variables. This study discerns the inferences from the studies conducted earlier to propose various aspects to be considered for future research and interventions targeting the effectiveness of life skills education for adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

Prolific examination of numerous theoretical and empirical studies addressing these variables was carried out to formulate assertions and postulations. Deducing from the studies in varied streams of education, public health, psychology, economics and international development, this paper is an endeavor toward clarifying some pertinent issues related to life skills education.

Findings

Although there is abundant evidence to encourage and assist the development of life skills as a tool to achieve other outcomes of interest, it is also important to see life skills as providing both instrumental and ultimate value to adolescents. Quality life skills education needs to be intertwined with the curriculum through the primary and secondary education, in the same way as literacy and numeracy skills.

Originality/value

The present study has important implications for educators and policymakers for designing effective life skills education programs. Additionally, this paper provides a three-step model based on Lewin’s three step prototype for change, to impart life skills trainings to adolescents through drafting pertinent systems. This will help in imparting quality life skills education to adolescents and raising them to be psychologically mature adults.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2019

David Hearne, Rebecca Semmens-Wheeler and Kimberley M. Hill

One of the most heated discussions regarding Brexit is over the nature of any future trade deal the UK is going to sign with the EU. There have been endless discussions…

Abstract

One of the most heated discussions regarding Brexit is over the nature of any future trade deal the UK is going to sign with the EU. There have been endless discussions since the referendum result about this crucial aspect question and nothing has been so far agreed. Some analysts, however, have already pointed to a series of issues that anything different from the status quo could cause. The case analysed in the following pages serves as a cautionary tale, and there is an important reason for that. It is a good illustration of the issues that can emerge when countries are members of some forms of regional associations but not of others and whose consequences can produce spill-overs from pure trade matters to more serious security concerns.

It is not very often that something as common as the import and export of agricultural products – especially non-exotic fruits and vegetables – becomes the object of such a dispute across multiple states. This is what happened in the now infamous case of Chinese garlic exports, which have seen several instances of smuggling, conviction, and fraud all over Europe in the last 20 years. Most incidents have taken place in Northern Europe, particularly Sweden, Norway, the UK and Ireland. There’s a reason for that, which will be explained below.

Details

Brexit Negotiations After Article 50: Assessing Process, Progress and Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-768-3

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Entrepreneurship: How Entrepreneurs Create Value from Sustainable Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-147-8

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