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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

The annual report of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries for 1905, which has just been issued, is a very interesting booklet, which the Board's elder brother, the Local…

Abstract

The annual report of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries for 1905, which has just been issued, is a very interesting booklet, which the Board's elder brother, the Local Government Board, might in some respects imitate with advantage in its publications dealing with kindred topics—but in some respects only.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 8 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Aeli Roberts, John Kelsey, Hedley Smyth and Adam Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between health and safety (H&S) and organisational culture in project business, in particular to explore the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between health and safety (H&S) and organisational culture in project business, in particular to explore the validity of current cognitive emphases of linear organisational maturity towards a “safety culture”, and normative models and prescriptions.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretative methodology is employed, informed by ethnography (Douglas' cultural theory) and clinical consultative (Schein's model) approaches, using case‐based analysis comprising seven project business organisations.

Findings

The cases were characterized by diverse organisational cultures and diverse H&S practices informed by habits and intuitive behaviour, as well as cognitive strategies and decisions for implementation. H&S was not the top priority for these cases. Good performance related to alignment with the prevailing culture rather than pursuit of a “safety culture”.

Research limitations/implications

The term “safety culture” is misdirected; greater attention on what is, rather than normative models and prescription, is necessary. Generalisation is limited by the case‐based approach.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to pay more attention to organisational culture and alignment of H&S practices, to the unintended consequences of prescriptions, and robust systems.

Social implications

The way activities are conducted requires awareness of the prevailing culture in order to align the structure and processes to the culture for effective operations. These implications are general, and within project business and management, Failure to do so carries increased risk of failing to satisfy business and broader stakeholder interests.

Originality/value

Anomalies in H&S research and practice are challenged, especially “safety culture” and normative approaches. The contribution is the combination employment of the Schein and Douglas models to understand organisational culture and H&S cultural alignment.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1960

SIR ALAN HERBERT writing in The Spectator of 8th January, 1960, puts forward a point of view that librarians will find provocative, to say the least.

Abstract

SIR ALAN HERBERT writing in The Spectator of 8th January, 1960, puts forward a point of view that librarians will find provocative, to say the least.

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New Library World, vol. 61 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1913

Inspectors visiting districts in connection with the Foreign Meat and Unsound Food Regulations have made detailed inquiries in certain instances in regard to local methods…

Abstract

Inspectors visiting districts in connection with the Foreign Meat and Unsound Food Regulations have made detailed inquiries in certain instances in regard to local methods of administration of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts. Special visits for this purpose have also been made to other districts where inquiry appeared to be specially called for. In the course of these inquiries it was found that in some instances the public analyst had made a report to his local authority on some special investigation which had been undertaken in the district respecting a particular article of food, but that copies of such report had not always reached the Board. During an inquiry in the county of Cheshire Dr. Coutts ascertained that the county analyst had made valuable reports in regard to butter and Cheshire cheese of which the Board were unaware. Reports of this nature are of much interest to this sub‐department, and it would be of advantage if local authorities would send to the Board copies of all special reports made by the public analyst.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Michael R. Powers

In forecasting unknown quantities, risk and finance decision makers often rely on one or more biased experts, statistical specialists representing parties with an interest…

Abstract

Purpose

In forecasting unknown quantities, risk and finance decision makers often rely on one or more biased experts, statistical specialists representing parties with an interest in the decision maker's final forecast. This problem arises in a variety of contexts, and the decision maker may represent a corporate enterprise, rating agency, government regulator, etc. The purpose of the paper is to assist decision makers, experts, and others to have a better understanding of the dynamics of the problem, and to adopt strategies and practices that enhance efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem is formulated as a two‐person, non‐cooperative Bayesian game with the decision maker and one expert as players, and perfect Bayesian equilibrium solutions are identified. Then the analysis is extended to variations of the game in which the expert's loss function is not common knowledge, and in which there are multiple experts.

Findings

In the struggle for information between the decision maker and the experts, the experts generally benefit from greater uncertainty about the parameters of the model. Thus, in attempting to elicit as much information as possible from the experts, the decision maker must strive to minimize all sources of uncertainty.

Research limitations/implications

As in most Bayesian games, the analysis requires that a variety of process assumptions and model parameters be common knowledge. These conditions may be difficult to satisfy in real‐world applications.

Practical implications

The principal finding of the study is that there is truly a struggle for information between the decision maker and the experts. This generally encourages the experts to inject as much uncertainty as possible into the process. To counter this effect, the decision maker might: provide incentives for the experts to increase their sampling information; try to mitigate specific uncertainties regarding the model parameters; and try to increase the number of experts.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to apply the framework of signaling games to the problem of eliciting information from biased experts. It is of value to decision makers, experts, and economic researchers.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1971

ELEVEN years ago a small group, of whom the writer was one, met in Oud Poelgeest Castle in Holland to consider forming a European body concerned with Work Study. They…

Abstract

ELEVEN years ago a small group, of whom the writer was one, met in Oud Poelgeest Castle in Holland to consider forming a European body concerned with Work Study. They share a sense of pride that the Federation which emerged will celebrate its decennary next month. Sadly, of the four British members of that group only two survive to greet the event.

Details

Work Study, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

L. Marce, M. Julliere, H. Place and H. Perrichot

Mobile robots offer more flexibility and scope than the fixed single arm type. French researchers are putting considerable effort into developing such devices and here…

Abstract

Mobile robots offer more flexibility and scope than the fixed single arm type. French researchers are putting considerable effort into developing such devices and here results of their efforts are described.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Nitin Gupta

This paper seeks to explore whether predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation would differ across demographic segments in an emerging market…

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3430

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore whether predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation would differ across demographic segments in an emerging market (India). Further, the paper aims to investigate if predisposition towards foreign brands (acting as a proxy for forces of globalization) would lead to consumer acculturation among consumers in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Instruments to measure predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation were developed on the basis of extensive literature review. The data comprised of urban, educated, middle‐class Indian consumers. The data were collected using structured questionnaire. ANOVA and T‐test results were used to determine if extent of predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation would differ across demographic segments. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the impact of predisposition towards foreign brands on consumer acculturation.

Findings

The findings indicate that significant difference exists among various demographic segments with respect to predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation. Also, predisposition towards foreign brands does impact consumer acculturation among Indian consumers. Various demographic factors such as age, income and educational qualification level significantly affect this causal relationship.

Practical implications

This paper provides interesting insights about the buying behavior of Indian consumers. These insights would enable corporate managers to develop more focused strategies catering to the Indian consumers.

Originality/value

The paper empirically demonstrates that Indian consumers, when segregated into various demographic segments, do show significant differences in their predisposition towards foreign brands and consumer acculturation. It also ascertains that predisposition towards foreign brands does lead to consumer acculturation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Omobolanle Ogunseiju, Johnson Olayiwola, Abiola Akanmu and Oluwole Alfred Olatunji

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders constitute a severe problem in the construction industry. Workers' lower backs are often affected by heavy or repetitive lifting and…

Abstract

Purpose

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders constitute a severe problem in the construction industry. Workers' lower backs are often affected by heavy or repetitive lifting and prolonged awkward postures. Exoskeletal interventions are effective for tasks involving manual lifting and repetitive movements. This study aims to examine the potential of a postural-assist exoskeleton (a passive exoskeleton) for manual material handling tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

From an experimental observation of participants, the effects of postural-assist exoskeleton on tasks and workers were measured. Associated benefits of the exoskeleton were assessed through task performance, range of motion and discomfort.

Findings

Findings suggest that the exoskeleton influenced discomfort significantly, however range of motion decreased with lifting tasks. The reduced back flexion and increased hip flexion were also indicatives of the participants' responsiveness to the feedback from the exoskeleton. In addition, task completion time increased by 20%, and participants' back pain did not reduce.

Research limitations/implications

The work tasks were performed in a controlled laboratory environment and only wearable inertia measurement units (IMUs) were used to assess the risk exposures of the body parts.

Practical implications

This study opens a practical pathway to human-exoskeleton integration, artificial regeneration or enablement of impaired workforce and a window toward a new order of productivity scaling. Results from this study provide preliminary insights to designers and innovators on the influence of postural assist exoskeleton on construction work. Project stakeholders can be informed of the suitability of the postural assist exoskeletons for manual material handling tasks.

Originality/value

Little has been reported on the benefits and impact of exoskeletons on tasks' physical demands and construction workers' performance. This study adds value to the existing literature, in particular by providing insights into the effectiveness and consequences of the postural-assist exoskeleton for manual material handling tasks.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Sachin Agarwal, Ravi Kant and Ravi Shankar

This paper intends to explore and appraise the humanitarian supply chain management enablers (HSCMEs) for efficient and effective humanitarian operations. This research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper intends to explore and appraise the humanitarian supply chain management enablers (HSCMEs) for efficient and effective humanitarian operations. This research aims to analyze the interaction of enablers for humanitarian supply chain management (HSCM) using a proposed hybrid framework consists of fuzzy Delphi (FD), interpretive structural modeling (ISM)–matriced impacts croises multiplication appliquee a un classement (MICMAC) and revised Simos approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is deliberate to identify 28 HSCMEs through a literature review and experts' opinions; out of which 20 HSCMEs are selected using FD. ISM is applied to know contextual relationship among the selected HSCMEs for developing a hierarchical model. The MICMAC analysis classifies the HSCMEs based on driving power and dependence power to validate the developed hierarchical ISM structure. The revised Simos technique is used to prioritize the HSCMEs to access its relative significance in humanitarian operations.

Findings

The finding of the analysis suggests that government policy and leadership support obtained the highest priority, having high driving power and low dependence power is significantly strategic and emerged as the leading driver for the HSCM implementation.

Research limitations/implications

ISM model presents an insight into interrelationship among HSCMEs, but this cannot quantify the impact of each HSCMEs.

Practical implications

Disaster relief aid agencies and stakeholders may focus on the enablers having high driving power and higher weight in designing and executing an effective and efficient humanitarian supply chain and to improve their activities and strategies of HSCM.

Social implications

This research helps humanitarian logisticians and humanitarian organizations to make better decisions to improve their operational performance in pre and postdisaster phases.

Originality/value

This paper explores the application of proposed hybrid framework to analyze the HSCMEs that can be considered as the original contribution.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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