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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Prashant Shukla, H. James Wilson, Allan Alter and David Lavieri

The authors explore the potential of machine learning, computers employ that an algorithm to sort data, make decisions and then continuously assess and improve their…

1645

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore the potential of machine learning, computers employ that an algorithm to sort data, make decisions and then continuously assess and improve their functionality. They suggest that it be used to power a radical redesign of company processes that they call machine reengineering.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interpret a survey of more than a thousand corporate public agency IT professionals on their use of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Findings

Companies that embrace machine learning find that it adds value to the work product of their employees and provides companies with new capabilities.

Practical implications

Working together with an intelligent machine, workers become custodians of powerfully smart tools, tools that personalize work to maximize their most productive ways of working.

Originality/value

A guide to establishing a culture that empowers employees to thrive alongside intelligent machines.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Ajit Kambil, H. James Wilson and Vipul Agrawal

When the price is right, profits follow.

Abstract

When the price is right, profits follow.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Abstract

Details

Marketing in Customer Technology Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-601-3

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

BEFORE everyone gets too excited over reports of declining attendances at the national museums since the introduction of entrance charges at the beginning of January…

Abstract

BEFORE everyone gets too excited over reports of declining attendances at the national museums since the introduction of entrance charges at the beginning of January, allowances should be made for the Victoria & Albert Museum's former and now discontinued habit of counting to‐and fro‐ing staff among its visitors, and the National Gallery's inclusion of the cognoscenti who were aware that it has the only public lavatories on the northern side of Trafalgar Square. Culture‐hunting has not hitherto accounted for all who passed through the portals of our national museums.

Details

New Library World, vol. 75 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Larry Goodson

321

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Robert M. Randall

270

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2022

Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi, Sarah Kenyon, Ashley Brown, Chelsea Donahue and Chris Wicher

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework that captures the strategic value of artificial intelligence (AI) systems. Although AI has become a crucial component…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework that captures the strategic value of artificial intelligence (AI) systems. Although AI has become a crucial component of digital transformation efforts tied to organizational strategy, many firms struggle to derive strategic value from emerging AI systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical framework in this paper is based on a learning-centered approach. Specifically, by building on the knowledge-based perspective, this paper elaborates on how AI can contribute to organizational learning to create a competitive advantage in knowledge-intensive contexts.

Findings

This paper argues that the power of AI as a strategic resource lies in its self-learning capacities. Such learning capacities are only realized in partnership with humans through mutual learning. This paper formulates the concept of artificial capital and the ways artificial and human capital can together drive routinization and strategic learning processes that connect internal and external environments of the organization.

Originality/value

This is a timely contribution as many organizations are considering adopting AI technologies for strategic purposes. This paper translates the proposed framework into several practical implications for managing and developing AI to meet strategic business goals.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Xusen Cheng, Ying Bao, Alex Zarifis, Wankun Gong and Jian Mou

Artificial intelligence (AI)-based chatbots have brought unprecedented business potential. This study aims to explore consumers' trust and response to a text-based chatbot…

6638

Abstract

Purpose

Artificial intelligence (AI)-based chatbots have brought unprecedented business potential. This study aims to explore consumers' trust and response to a text-based chatbot in e-commerce, involving the moderating effects of task complexity and chatbot identity disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method with 299 useable responses was conducted in this research. This study adopted the ordinary least squares regression to test the hypotheses.

Findings

First, the consumers' perception of both the empathy and friendliness of the chatbot positively impacts their trust in it. Second, task complexity negatively moderates the relationship between friendliness and consumers' trust. Third, disclosure of the text-based chatbot negatively moderates the relationship between empathy and consumers' trust, while it positively moderates the relationship between friendliness and consumers' trust. Fourth, consumers' trust in the chatbot increases their reliance on the chatbot and decreases their resistance to the chatbot in future interactions.

Research limitations/implications

Adopting the stimulus–organism–response (SOR) framework, this study provides important insights on consumers' perception and response to the text-based chatbot. The findings of this research also make suggestions that can increase consumers' positive responses to text-based chatbots.

Originality/value

Extant studies have investigated the effects of automated bots' attributes on consumers' perceptions. However, the boundary conditions of these effects are largely ignored. This research is one of the first attempts to provide a deep understanding of consumers' responses to a chatbot.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term…

1877

Abstract

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term of that contract. When such a repudiation has been accepted by the innocent party then a termination of employment takes place. Such termination does not constitute dismissal (see London v. James Laidlaw & Sons Ltd (1974) IRLR 136 and Gannon v. J. C. Firth (1976) IRLR 415 EAT).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1901

The Sanitary Committee of a certain County Council, strong with the strength of recent creation, have lately been animated by a desire to distinguish themselves in some…

Abstract

The Sanitary Committee of a certain County Council, strong with the strength of recent creation, have lately been animated by a desire to distinguish themselves in some way, and, proceeding along the lines of least resistance, they appear to have selected the Public Analyst as the most suitable object for attack. The charge against this unfortunate official was not that he is incompetent, or that he had been in any way negligent of his duties as prescribed by Act of Parliament, but simply and solely that he has the temerity to reside in London, which city is distant by a certain number of miles from the much favoured district controlled by the County Council aforesaid. The committee were favoured in their deliberations by the assistance of no less an authority than the “Principal” of a local “Technical School”;—and who could be more capable than he to express an opinion upon so simple a matter? This eminent exponent of scientific truths, after due and proper consideration, is reported to have delivered himself of the opinion that “scientifically it would be desirable that the analyst should reside in the district, as the delay occasioned by the sending of samples of water to London is liable to produce a misleading effect upon an analysis.” Apparently appalled by the contemplation of such possibilities, and strengthened by another expression of opinion to the effect that there were as “good men” in the district as in London, the committee resolved to recommend the County Council to determine the existing arrangement with the Public Analyst, and to appoint a “local analyst for all purposes.” Thus, the only objection which could be urged to the employment of a Public Analyst resident in London was the ridiculous one that the composition of a sample of water was likely to seriously alter during the period of its transit to London, and this contention becomes still more absurd when it is remembered that the examination of water samples is no part of the official duty of a Public Analyst. The employment of local scientific talent may be very proper when the object to be attained is simply the more or less imperfect instruction of the rising generation in the rudiments of what passes in this country for “technical education”; but the work of the Public Analyst is serious and responsible, and cannot be lightly undertaken by every person who may be acquainted with some of the uses of a test‐tube. The worthy members of this committee may find to their cost, as other committees have found before them, that persons possessing the requisite knowledge and experience are not necessarily indigenous to their district. Supposing that the County Council adopts the recommendation, the aspirations of the committee may even then be strangled in their infancy, as the Local Government Board will want to know all about the matter, and the committee will have to give serious and valid reasons in support of their case.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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