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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Ibrahim Alghanimi

This paper aims to summarize the radiological interventions that can be used by obstetricians and gynecologists.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarize the radiological interventions that can be used by obstetricians and gynecologists.

Design/methodology/approach

E-health systems apply in all hospital sectors in the world; interventional radiology (IR) now includes transcatheter and percutaneous techniques that can be applied to various organ systems, including the female reproductive system and pelvis. Interventional radiologists can now offer many services to obstetricians and gynecologists. With the advent of new procedures and refinement of existing techniques, there are now a number of procedures that can be used to treat both vascular and non-vascular diseases. This review summarizes the radiological interventions that can be used by obstetricians and gynecologists.

Findings

This review is intended to help gynecologists and obstetricians understand the role of IR in their specialty. Many valuable vascular and nonvascular interventional services can be provided by radiologists for both obstetric and gynecological indications. Many of these IR procedures are minimally invasive with less risk to the patients.

Originality/value

IR is now being used to treat some conditions encountered in obstetrics and gynecology, in particular, uterine leiomyomas, placenta accreta, postpartum hemorrhage and pelvic congestion syndrome. Moreover, with the help of IR, radiologists can also manage several nonvascular pathologies, including drainage of pelvic abscesses, fallopian tube recanalization, image-guided biopsy and fluid collections involving ovarian lesions. The major challenges faced when performing obstetric IR procedures are reduction of radiation exposure for the patient and fetus and preservation of fertility. This review highlights the role of IR in the treatment of various vascular and nonvascular pathologies encountered in obstetrics and gynecology.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Zehra Zeynep Sadıkoğlu

Turkish mothers’ interactions with medical authorities during pregnancy and childbirth have developed in a context of risk discourses produced by biomedical experts with…

Abstract

Turkish mothers’ interactions with medical authorities during pregnancy and childbirth have developed in a context of risk discourses produced by biomedical experts with surveillance justified by these discourses. Giving meaning to pregnancy and childbirth through the search for the reduction of risks is a reflexive part of Turkish mothers’ everyday life.

This research paper aims to discuss a study examining how pregnancy and childbirth are socially constructed, how increased medicalization is experienced by Turkish mothers, and how they assign meaning to pregnancy and childbirth. A phenomenological research was designed using depth interviews with 10 Turkish mothers with children aged 0–6 years, living in Istanbul who had high education and welfare levels.

The findings shed light on Turkish mothers’ subjective experiences and how medicine as a profession shapes these experiences. With the medicalization of pregnancy and childbirth, how the trust toward the experts, the knowledge of preparation for maternity in an appropriate and responsible manner have become functional for Turkish mothers to create a sense of ontological security are examined.

Details

Childbearing and the Changing Nature of Parenthood: The Contexts, Actors, and Experiences of Having Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-067-2

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2008

Adina Nack

Medical encounters are interactional/interpersonal processes taking place within contexts shaped by macro-level social structures. In the case of sexually transmitted…

Abstract

Medical encounters are interactional/interpersonal processes taking place within contexts shaped by macro-level social structures. In the case of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), medical encounters occur at a stigmatized crossroads of social control and gendered norms of sexual behavior. When women are diagnosed and treated for chronic STDs, practitioner demeanor has an important impact on how patients will view not only their health status but also their moral status. This chapter draws on in depth interviews with 40 women diagnosed with genital infections of herpes and/or human papillomavirus (HPV – the cause of genital warts) to explore three models of patient–practitioner interaction. The analysis focuses on the relationship between gender, construction of illness, and practitioner interaction style. In a broader context, the health risks posed by particular interaction styles to female STD patients shed light on larger public health implications of combining morality with medicine for the broader range of patients with stigmatizing diagnoses.

Details

Care for Major Health Problems and Population Health Concerns: Impacts on Patients, Providers and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-160-2

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Abiola Adeniyi, Leeann Donnelly, Patricia Janssen, Cecilia Jevitt, Michael Siarkowski and Mario Brondani

Integrating preventive oral care into prenatal care is suggested as a strategy for reducing the burden of oral diseases among pregnant women and their offspring. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating preventive oral care into prenatal care is suggested as a strategy for reducing the burden of oral diseases among pregnant women and their offspring. This scoping review sought to synthesize available information and identify knowledge gaps on integrating oral health into prenatal care.

Design/methodology/approach

The scoping review was conducted based on the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review framework using the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, ProQuest Dissertation and theses Global, Psychinfo and Web of Science®. No search limits were used. Content analysis of the included articles was performed to identify conceptual frameworks, types of integration used, study designs, study objectives and outcomes.

Findings

Overall, 2,861 references were obtained from the databases search; and based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria 35 references were included in the final analysis. Of these 35 references, one document presented a conceptual model, six documents reviewed guidelines for integrating oral health in prenatal care, two were policy documents aimed at interprofessional collaboration for oral health during pregnancy, eight documents described programs focused on providing oral care during pregnancy, five of the references were literature reviews and the remaining 13 evaluated the impact of integration. Linkages between healthcare professionals were the most common type of integration used.

Research limitations/implications

Despite advances in understanding integrated care concepts for healthcare delivery, there is little evidence available on the impact of the various types of, and strategies for, integrating oral health into prenatal care. Future research to bridge the identified gaps is recommended.

Originality/value

The originality of this study is to provide evidence on integrated oral healthcare during pregnancy.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Yasmin Khodary and Nehal Hamdy

This study aims to detect the main factors impeding the anti-female genital mutilation (FGM) efforts in Egypt post the January 25 revolution, with a special focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to detect the main factors impeding the anti-female genital mutilation (FGM) efforts in Egypt post the January 25 revolution, with a special focus on the era of president El-Sisi. The purpose of this paper is to explain the reasons behind the continuation of violence against women in Egypt, namely, FGM, in light of the patriarchal structures and the state willingness to address that challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes a qualitative methodology. The study embarks on in-depth semi-structured interviews with 23 participants who experienced FGM and nine key informants from medical, religious, political and civil society backgrounds, including a professor of pathology, a gynecologist, a diplomatic researcher in Al-Azhar, three members of parliament, a representative of the Ministry of Population, the reporter of the National Council for Women and a representative of Nazra non-governmental organization for feminist studies in Egypt.

Findings

The findings reveal that FGM remains prevalent not only due to the persisting socio-cultural context that continues to embrace and reproduces gender inequalities, but also because of the insufficient political will to combat FGM and enforce the required laws.

Social implications

FGM is considered one form of gender inequality perpetuated by social, cultural and economic structures. It is recognized internationally as a crime and a violation against women’s rights as per the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, etc. Although the Egyptian Government passed laws banning the practice of FGM, it continues to form a challenging problem to social workers, women activists, human rights groups and public health officials.

Originality/value

Little work has been done to investigate FGM post the January 25 revolution in Egypt and identify the main factors impeding the anti-FGM efforts in Egypt. This work fills this gap and concludes with some lessons learnt to fight FGM and improve the anti-FGM efforts.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Robert Shapiro, Rose Laignel, Caitlin Kowcheck, Valerie White and Mahreen Hashmi

Previous studies indicate adherence to pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines has been inadequate. The purpose of this paper is to determine adherence rates to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies indicate adherence to pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines has been inadequate. The purpose of this paper is to determine adherence rates to current perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines in gynecologic surgery at a tertiary care, academic institution. As a secondary outcome, improving guidelines after physician re-education were analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective chart review (2,463 patients) was completed. The authors determined if patients received perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in accordance with current guidelines from the America College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Data were obtained before and after physician tutorials. Quality control was implemented by making guideline failures transparent. Statistical analysis used Fisher’s exact and agreement tests.

Findings

In total, 23 percent of patients received antibiotics not indicated across all procedures. This decreased to 9 percent after physician re-education and outcome transparency (p<0.0001). Laparoscopy was the procedure with the lowest guideline compliance prior to education. The compliance improved from 52 to 92 percent (p<0.0001) after re-education.

Practical implications

Gynecologic surgeons overuse antibiotics for surgical prophylaxis. Physician re-education and transparency were shown to enhance compliance.

Originality/value

Educational tutorials are an effective strategy for encouraging physicians to improve outcomes, which, in turn, allows the healthcare system a non-punitive way to monitor quality and mitigate cost.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Anthony M. Hopper and Maria Uriyo

The purpose of this paper is to test the usefulness of sentiment analysis and time-to-next-complaint methods in quantifying text-based information located on the internet…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the usefulness of sentiment analysis and time-to-next-complaint methods in quantifying text-based information located on the internet. As important, the authors demonstrate how managers can use time-to-next-complaint techniques to organize sentiment analysis derived data into useful information, which can be shared with doctors and other staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used sentiment analysis to review patient feedback for a select group of gynecologists in Virginia. The authors utilized time-to-next-complaint methods along with other techniques to organize this data into meaningful information.

Findings

The authors demonstrated that sentiment analysis and time-to-next-complaint techniques might be useful tools for healthcare managers who are interested in transforming web-based text into meaningful, quantifiable information.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations. For one thing, neither the data set nor the techniques the authors used to analyze it will account for biases that resulted from selection issues related to gender, income, and culture, as well as from other socio-demographic concerns. Additionally, the authors lacked key data concerning patient volumes for the targeted physicians. Finally, it may be difficult to convince doctors to consider web-based comments as truthful, thereby preventing healthcare managers from using data located on the internet.

Practical implications

The report illustrates some of the ways in which healthcare administrators can utilize sentiment analysis, along with time-to-next-complaint techniques, to mine web-based, patient comments for meaningful information.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to illustrate ways in which administrators at clinics and physicians’ offices can utilize sentiment analysis and time-to-next-complaint methods to analyze web-based patient comments.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Siri Suh

To explore the politics of gender, health, medicine, and citizenship in high-income countries, medical sociologists have focused primarily on the practice of legal…

Abstract

To explore the politics of gender, health, medicine, and citizenship in high-income countries, medical sociologists have focused primarily on the practice of legal abortion. In middle- and low-income countries with restrictive abortion laws, however, medical sociologists must examine what happens when women have already experienced spontaneous or induced abortion. Post-abortion care (PAC), a global reproductive health intervention that treats complications of abortion and has been implemented in nearly 50 countries worldwide, offers important theoretical insights into transnational politics of abortion and reproduction in countries with restrictive abortion laws. In this chapter, I draw on my ethnography of Senegal’s PAC program to examine the professional, clinical, and technological politics and practices of obstetric care for abortions that have already occurred. I use the sociological concepts of professional boundary work and boundary objects to demonstrate how Senegalese health professionals have established the political and clinical legitimacy of PAC. I demonstrate the professional precariousness of practicing PAC for physicians, midwives, and nurses. I show how the dual capacity of PAC technologies to terminate pregnancy and treat abortion complications has limited their circulation within the health system, thereby reducing quality of care. Given the contradictory and complex global landscape of twenty-first-century abortion governance, in which pharmaceutical forms of abortion such as Misoprostol are increasingly available in developing countries, and as abortion restrictions are increasingly enforced across the developed world, PAC offers important theoretical opportunities to advance medical sociology research on abortion politics and practices in the global North and South.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Carol A.B Warren

The medical suppression of female sexuality in Victorian society has long been the subject of historical and cultural scholarship, with documentation not only of textual…

Abstract

The medical suppression of female sexuality in Victorian society has long been the subject of historical and cultural scholarship, with documentation not only of textual threats by religious and medical “experts,” but also of surgical assaults on female reproductive systems (Longo, 1979, 1986; Scull & Favreau, 1986; Sheehan, 1997). Less well known is the apparent obverse: the use of medical techniques to stimulate the female genitalia as a means of treating hysteria and other mental disorders (Maines, 1999; Schleiner, 1995). In this paper, I trace the cultural history (mainly Anglo-American) of the psychiatric enhancement, as well as repression, of female sexual pleasure, through various genital treatments, including the surgical and the electrical.1 I then make the case that these “opposite” treatments are, in the context of Victorian society, two sides of the same coin of the patriarchal, medical control of female sexuality.2

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Reproduction and Sexuality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-088-3

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2015

Francesca Minerva

Healthcare practitioners, according to legislations in most Western countries, may refuse to perform some medical activities that conflict with their moral and religious…

Abstract

Healthcare practitioners, according to legislations in most Western countries, may refuse to perform some medical activities that conflict with their moral and religious values. The Roman Catholic Church has declared in official documents that doctors should not perform or facilitate activities considered immoral such as abortion and euthanasia. The goal of this paper is to suggest new options for regulating conscientious objection of Roman Catholic healthcare practitioners.

Details

Conscience, Leadership and the Problem of ‘Dirty Hands’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-203-0

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