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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Marcelle Cacciattolo and Gwen Gilmore

The purpose of this paper is to investigate those teaching and learning factors that either hindered or encouraged preservice teacher participants to succeed in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate those teaching and learning factors that either hindered or encouraged preservice teacher participants to succeed in their first year of study. The impact of administrative support alongside pedagogical styles that facilitated a sense of engagement for first year preservice teachers is also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This research builds on the work of Sarah Lawrence-Lightfoot’s use of “portraiture” to “capture the complexity and aesthetic of human experience” (Lawrence-Lightfoot & Hoffmann Davis, 1997, p. 4). The use of portraits as a tool for creating a first year student narrative, rich in its canvas of human emotions, is central to the work that follows. Qualitative data that were gathered in this research project are presented.

Findings

The portraiture methodology in this paper enabled the researchers to capture a sense of belonging for first year university students that involved more than procedural matters, orientation events and attendance at information sessions.

Practical implications

These portraits draw wider attention to transition and retention matters beyond considerations of “who our students are” and illustrate how engagement and belonging are enhanced by how these students are engaged by skilful and knowledgeable tutors and group work and collegial approaches to the course.

Originality/value

Portraiture methodology enabled a more nuanced form of viewing “belonging” and “engagement” of these preservice teachers through more personalised forms of engagement with tutors, the development of groups and the practicum placement.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Amanda Carr, Gwen Gilmore and Marcelle Cacciattolo

The purpose of this paper is to discuss that in 2012, a small group of teaching staff in a new diploma of Education Studies program came together to critically reflect on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss that in 2012, a small group of teaching staff in a new diploma of Education Studies program came together to critically reflect on teaching approaches that either hindered or encouraged learners to thrive in the transition environment in higher education (HE).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the use of case writing as a methodological tool for engaging in reflexive inquiry in a HE cross-faculty setting; it also adds a further dimension to the work of (Burridge et al., 2010). The team used a systematic coding activity, known as “threading,” to unpack over-arching themes that were embedded in each other’s narratives.

Findings

Throughout the two years of the project, 12 cases were presented on key critical teaching moments that the researchers had experienced. The themes varied and included topics like student reflections on why they found learning challenging, teachers’ mixed emotions about failing students, difficulties for teachers in having to persuade students to read academic texts, teacher/student confrontations and student resilience amidst challenges linked to their personal and student lives.

Social implications

A central theme to emerge from the research was that complexities arise for teachers when they are faced with learners who are apparently not suited to the career pathway they have signed up for.

Originality/value

Through using a collaborative practitioner research framework, enunciating concerns were raised and different interpretations of the same incident were shared. The paper concludes that case writing can assist academics to be more informed of teaching approaches that lead to successful learning outcomes.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Durell M. Callier

In lieu of recent violent acts and the deaths of quare individuals‐queers of colour (e.g. Jorge Steven Lopez Mercado, Carl Walker‐Hoover, Jaheem Herrera, Sakia Gunn, etc.…

Abstract

In lieu of recent violent acts and the deaths of quare individuals‐queers of colour (e.g. Jorge Steven Lopez Mercado, Carl Walker‐Hoover, Jaheem Herrera, Sakia Gunn, etc.) this piece remembers their lives, while reimagining our current sociopolitical landscape (Johnson, 2006). Recognising the spiritual as political (Jacqui Alexander, 2005), this work calls upon our collective memories‐psychological, bodily and sacred‐to remember the tragedies and lessons of love necessary to heal our collective wounds. Through a polyvocal montage performance text, life, living, love, and quareness are explored. Believing love as the core of Christianity, and the necessity of love to sustain life, revolution, justice and equality, A Call to Love questions our love practices, urging us to operate from that commonality.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Rachel Crane

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and…

Abstract

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and interpretations of the life of Woody Guthrie.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

John Alexander McIntyre

The purpose of this paper is to examine the work of Rosemary Benjamin’s Theatre for Children in Sydney as a compelling narrative of the New Education in Australia in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the work of Rosemary Benjamin’s Theatre for Children in Sydney as a compelling narrative of the New Education in Australia in the late 1930s, an historical moment when theatre for children emerged as a cultural experiment rich in educational ideas.

Design/methodology/approach

Contemporary sources and archival records are explored through several interpretive frames to develop a historical account of Benjamin’s Theatre for Children from 1937 to 1957.

Findings

Benjamin’s concept of children’s theatre was shaped by English progressive education as much as the Soviet model she extolled. She pursued her project in Sydney from 1937 because she found there a convivial European emigré community who encouraged her enterprise. They understood her Freudian ideas, which commended the use of the symbolic resources of myth and fairy tales to help children deal with difficult unconscious material. Benjamin also analysed audience reactions applying child study principles, evidence of the influence of Susan Isaacs and the New Education Fellowship. More successful as a Publicist than a Producer, Benjamin was able to mobilise support for her educational cause among performers, parents, cultural figures and educational authorities. Her contribution was to pave the way for those who would succeed with different models of theatre for children.

Originality/value

This is the first study to employ archival sources to document the history of the Theatre for Children, Sydney and address its neglect as a theatre project combining educational and theatrical values.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Bryce Hannibal and Hiroshi Ono

This paper explores the social-behavioral aspects of financial markets. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of social relations and networks which contributed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the social-behavioral aspects of financial markets. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of social relations and networks which contributed to the market crash in the US telecommunications sector in the late 1990s.

Design/methodology/approach

A network theoretic approach is used to examine historical qualitative data. The authors suggest that the network characteristics of financial intermediaries allowed security analysts to control and manipulate information that was disclosed to the investing public.

Findings

The authors find evidence that brokerage locations in the network of actors within the telecommunications market allowed select individuals opportunities to engage in unethical behavior and malfeasance. The authors further highlight the harmful effects of over-embeddedness by illustrating that strong and dense network ties within the financial sector were exploited to distort the flow and reliability of information. The paper concludes with a note on the generalizability of this study and an examination of the current economic-legal structure of Wall Street.

Originality/value

Recently, some economists and network scholars have begun examining social relations more thoroughly in the financial sector. This paper is one of the first that focuses specifically on the role and network location of research analysts prior to a market collapse.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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