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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jenny Pannell and Guy Palmer

Older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness have diverse and varied needs. Their needs are not the same as those of either younger homeless people or older…

Abstract

Older people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness have diverse and varied needs. Their needs are not the same as those of either younger homeless people or older people who already have secure and appropriate housing. This article explains the problems and proposes cost‐effective solutions for commissioners and providers.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Lynn Watson

Abstract

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

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Working with Older People, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Catherine Palmer

Purpose – To outline new research on the ways in which older athletes incorporate drinking practices into their social and sporting identities. Drawing on research with…

Abstract

Purpose – To outline new research on the ways in which older athletes incorporate drinking practices into their social and sporting identities. Drawing on research with older Australian athletes, the chapter asks us to re-imagine the sport–alcohol nexus to include new sites and subjects that can shed light on wider articulations of the pleasurable and problematic relationships between sport, alcohol and social identity.

Design/methodology/approach – In the first part of the chapter, key themes in sport and ageing research are discussed. In the second, issues of alcohol, older age and sporting identities are considered, drawing on research at the 2017 Australian Masters Games. This sets the scene for a fuller discussion and analysis of some of the missed opportunities in alcohol and sport research, and their implications for sport and social policy, health promotion and social care more broadly.

Findings – The chapter reveals several under-developed opportunities in a broader research agenda on sport and alcohol, including the role alcohol plays in conferring membership and belonging to the sporting communities of older athletes. The chapter suggests that a recalibration of popular understandings of sport, ageing and alcohol – both as separate and as inter-related concerns – may provide an opportunity for addressing wider social concerns with ageing more broadly.

Research limitations/implications – Discussion of ageing and alcohol, through the lens of sport, has important implications for an analysis of drinking practices and in sport, and for sport and social policy, health promotion and social care.

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Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Kate Sylvester and Brent McDonald

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how female university kendo club members participate in kendo-related hegemonic drinking in formal (heterosocial) and informal…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter illustrates how female university kendo club members participate in kendo-related hegemonic drinking in formal (heterosocial) and informal (homosocial) club settings. An alternative perspective on gender relations and identity politics in Japan is outlined in this chapter by describing the significance of hegemonic drinking for female kendo club members within homosocial spaces.

Methodology – As a participant-observer, an ethnographic method was applied for an 18-month period as a quasi-member of a Japanese Sports University Kendo Club. Key to accessing the female members' lived experience was the primary author's participation in daily training and the consumption of alcohol in various kendo spaces. The data discussed in this chapter were collected via semi-structured interviews, daily self-reflexive descriptive field notes and ethnographic interviews.

Findings – Hegemonic drinking practices in heterosocial university kendo club spaces encompass networking opportunity, transference of knowledge, and fortitude building, all of which are systemized to support the advancement of male members. Although female members are relatively obscured in heterosocial spaces, women mimic and engage in hegemonic drinking practices in homosocial settings to substantiate meaning to their membership.

Research limitations/implication – Research that engages with the intersection of sport and gender needs to consider aspects of social interaction not only of the physical component of the sport but also the other day-to-day activities related to it. The examination of women and kendo-related hegemonic drinking in this chapter provides an insightful perspective and highlights the value of the ethnographic method in unexplored places of enquiry integral to researching physical cultures and body politics in Japan.

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Sport, Alcohol and Social Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-842-0

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Catherine Palmer

To outline the paradoxes and contradictions inherent in debates about sport, alcohol, and addiction. It appears that a growing number of sportspeople suffer from addiction…

Abstract

Purpose

To outline the paradoxes and contradictions inherent in debates about sport, alcohol, and addiction. It appears that a growing number of sportspeople suffer from addiction to alcohol and other drugs while at the same time alcohol use is widely sanctioned and celebrated in sport. The high-profile falls from grace are a public display of a more insidious, problematic relationship to drugs and alcohol in sport, yet cultural change is often difficult given long standing associations between sport and alcohol.

Design/Method/Approach

In the first part of the chapter, the key themes in the drugs, alcohol, and sport debate (notably health and ethics) are discussed. In the second part, some of the relationships between sport and alcohol, such as sponsorship and the cultural sanctioning of particular forms of drinking and masculine identities are examined. In the third, the issues of drug and alcohol addiction and recovery, and the implications for sport and sporting identities are discussed.

Findings

The chapter reveals the tensions that underpin the social contexts of drug and alcohol use and misuse in sport. The chapter suggests that a recalibration of popular understandings of masculinity in sport may provide a safe space through which to share battles with alcohol and addiction.

Research Limitations/Implications

Discussion of the paradoxes and contradictions inherent in the relationships between sport and alcohol have important implications for a discussion and analysis of addiction and alcohol in sport, and for sport and social policy, health promotion, and social care more broadly.

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Sport, Mental Illness, and Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-469-1

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Case study
Publication date: 11 July 2007

Marian Chapman Moore, Ronald T. Wilcox and Geraldine R. Henderson

”Green Ox” was written specifically for a midterm exam in an MBA marketing management class. Rather than focus on one particular concept or issue (e.g., segmentation…

Abstract

”Green Ox” was written specifically for a midterm exam in an MBA marketing management class. Rather than focus on one particular concept or issue (e.g., segmentation, product line depth), the case challenges students to develop a marketing strategy for a food and beverage manufacturer’s new line of sports beverages, which contain beneficial antioxidants. Focal decisions include choosing a segmentation scheme(s) and a specific target segment(s) and articulating a positioning statement(s) for the new product—all in light of market trends, customer information, and competitor positions. Students must also make recommendations regarding the product name, number of products in the line, and the price (including a break-even analysis). Distribution and promotion issues are downplayed, yet there is sufficient information to determine whether students’ recommendations on the larger issues account for the necessary integration of the 4Ps.

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Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Maddi McGillvray

The horror genre is and always has been populated by women, who can be seen to be at once both objectified and empowered. Building off the preexisting gender hierarchies…

Abstract

The horror genre is and always has been populated by women, who can be seen to be at once both objectified and empowered. Building off the preexisting gender hierarchies and dynamics embedded in the history of horror cinema, this chapter looks at a number of New French Extremity films that assault audiences with unrelenting scenes of violence, torture and self-mutilation, which are performed almost exclusively upon or by women. Although the films of the New French Extremity have been dismissed as exploitative in their representations of wounded and suffering female bodies, their narratives also offer internal criticisms of the misogynistic portals of victimhood that are prevalent in the genre. Through a close analysis of the films Inside (Bustillo & Maury, 2007) (French title: À L’intérieur) and Martyrs (Laugier, 2008), this chapter will examine how both films deviate from the male monster/female victim dichotomy. Although the women of these films may start off vulnerable, they take charge of their situations, while also compacting the nature of feminine identity.

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Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Stephen L. Eliason

The purpose of this research was to identify and describe factors associated with job satisfaction among conservation officers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to identify and describe factors associated with job satisfaction among conservation officers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took a qualitative approach to data collection that included a survey and 24 in‐depth interviews with Kentucky conservation officers. Data were examined with the intention of identifying common themes.

Findings

Four categories associated with job satisfaction were identified: enjoyment of the outdoors, independence, job diversity/variety, and meeting people. The majority of conservation officers found their work very satisfying.

Research limitations/implications

The results are not generalizable, given the qualitative nature of the research. To allow the generalizability of findings, future research should include quantitative measures that could specify how additional factors are related to job satisfaction among conservation officers, such as age, years of service, rank, and education. Future studies should also examine job satisfaction among female conservation officers.

Practical implications

A useful source of information for individuals who are considering a career in conservation law enforcement.

Originality/value

This paper extends understanding of job satisfaction among police, and should be of particular interest to state wildlife agencies as well as those interested in rural and specialized policing.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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