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1 – 7 of 7
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2011

Gunilla Johansson, Christer Sandahl and Birgitta Andershed

The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of registered nurses (RNs), enrolled nurses (ENs), and leaders (i.e. the first‐line nurse manager, F‐LNM and the…

2730

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of registered nurses (RNs), enrolled nurses (ENs), and leaders (i.e. the first‐line nurse manager, F‐LNM and the substitute F‐LNM) as to what characterises an excellent work environment in a palliative care unit and the involvement of leadership in that environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using two separate instruments: a questionnaire, group interviews with nurses and leaders, and documents at a palliative care unit. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the material.

Findings

According to the participants, the most important component at the palliative care unit was to accomplish the vision of good palliative care. Congruence in leadership, mature group functioning, adequate organisational structures and resources, and comprehensive and shared meaningfulness were all identified as essential components for fulfilling the vision.

Originality/value

This study indicates that fulfilling the vision of good palliative care may function as a buffer against stress in such a workplace

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2011

Jennifer Bowerman

318

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Gunilla Ölundh Sandström and Johan Tingström

The purpose of this paper is to explore the driving forces for taking environmental considerations to a higher level in a project involving radical innovation.

1956

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the driving forces for taking environmental considerations to a higher level in a project involving radical innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study is based on ten in‐depth interviews with respondents from the development team for the DryQ project at ABB.

Findings

In order to achieve substantial environmental benefits, radical product development is essential. Radical product development has attributes that differ from those of incremental product development. It is important that these differences be acknowledged when preparing to manage environmental challenges in development projects. In radical product development, environmental considerations should be taken into account very early on, at the strategic level of the design process. Setting challenging environmental targets and rewarding environmental improvements was crucial to the outcome of the project presented in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The research presented here describes one case in one manufacturing company. Readers can, however, learn from this case and apply the insights gained to their own research or use the findings to promote new thinking in their own organisation.

Practical implications

Suggestions are made about how to manage environmental considerations in radical product development.

Originality/value

Few studies combine ecodesign and radical innovation theories, as is done here. Yet this is not a theoretical paper but an industry‐based study of eco‐innovation, from which researchers and practitioners can learn.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Nancy Fjällbrant

This paper introduces the concept of information literacy and describes the impact of information technology on information literacy. The European Union funded EDUCATE project…

4393

Abstract

This paper introduces the concept of information literacy and describes the impact of information technology on information literacy. The European Union funded EDUCATE project addressed the subject‐related aspects of information literacy for scientists and engineers. One outcome of the project was a series of modules covering ways of accessing and searching information that could be used in formal courses, distance learning courses or for self‐instruction. EDUCATE “spawned” a number of other projects. One, DEDICATE, deals with distance education information courses and is described in the paper along with brief details of its use in various universities in Central and Eastern Europe.

Details

Program, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Gunilla Albinsson and Kerstin Arnesson

The purpose of this article is to show how a model for sustainable learning has been formed in the meetings between practitioners and researchers.

1517

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to show how a model for sustainable learning has been formed in the meetings between practitioners and researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

With the point of departure in an interactive research approach, the authors have worked with learning and common knowledge development. Empirical data were collected from nine learning seminars, which were carried out within the framework of an EU project.

Findings

It is shown by means of empirical examples from an ongoing EU project how the pedagogic method of learning seminars came to be a mediating tool for reciprocal learning between researchers, project leaders and project participants.

Originality/value

The learning seminars constituted an important part of a reflexive learning process where the learning consists of both practicable and theoretically anchored knowledge. Together with the project participants, the authors developed a model for sustainable learning. This model consists of a reflection model, which rests on four fundamental conditions; pedagogic leadership, the learning group, problem areas/situation and time aspects. This article fills a significant knowledge gap in terms of the development of learning within organizations.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Eva Lindell, Irina Popova and Anna Uhlin

The ongoing “digitalization of work” is one of the major phenomena shaping contemporary organizations. The aim of this study is to explore linguistic constructs of white-collar…

2137

Abstract

Purpose

The ongoing “digitalization of work” is one of the major phenomena shaping contemporary organizations. The aim of this study is to explore linguistic constructs of white-collar workers (WCWs) related to their use of digital tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework of ideological dilemmas (Billig et al., 1988) is mobilized to investigate the conflicting demands WCW interviewees construct when describing the ongoing digitalization of their office work.

Findings

This study shows how “digitalization of work” is enforcing an organizational ideological dilemma of structure and flexibility for WCWs. In the digital workplace, this dilemma is linguistically expressed as the individual should be, or should want to be, both flexible and structured in her work.

Practical implications

The use of language exposes conflicting ideals in the use of digital tools that might increase work–life stress. Implications for managers include acknowledging the dilemmas WCWs face in digitalized organizations and supporting them before they embark upon a digitalization journey.

Originality/value

The study shows that the negotiation between competing organizational discourses is constructed irrespective of hierarchical positions; the organizations digital maturity; private or public sector; or country. The study confirms contradictory ideological claims as “natural” and unquestionable in digitalized officework.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Carin Holmquist and Elisabeth Sundin

The aim of this article is to discuss how age and entrepreneurship interact in the specific case of older (50+) entrepreneurs. Building on theories on entrepreneurship and…

1232

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to discuss how age and entrepreneurship interact in the specific case of older (50+) entrepreneurs. Building on theories on entrepreneurship and theories on age and aging, the authors’ focus is on how such entrepreneurs relate to the building and running of a business organization. The authors discuss how entrepreneurship among the elderly plays out and how older entrepreneurs relate to the narratives on both age and entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

This research comprises quantitative as well as qualitative studies. The authors show that qualitative methods that unfold the process over time are necessary and essential to fully understand how and why entrepreneurs start their own business and/or continue to run it at older ages.

Findings

The authors find that the choice to become an entrepreneur at the age of 50+ (or to stay as one) is not a goal in itself, becoming an entrepreneur is a means to stay active in the labor market.

Originality/value

The study findings add to entrepreneurship theory by insights on the link between entrepreneurship and the labor market where the authors argue that becoming an entrepreneur at ages 50+ might be more a question of choice of organizational form than a question on a way of living or occupation. The authors also contribute to theories on age by showing that entrepreneurs aged 50+ choose entrepreneurship as a means to be able to stay in the labor market.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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