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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Anne M. Lavack

Faced with ever-increasing advertising restrictions, sponsorship of sports has been an important promotional avenue for tobacco companies in North America and around the…

Abstract

Faced with ever-increasing advertising restrictions, sponsorship of sports has been an important promotional avenue for tobacco companies in North America and around the world. This paper examines the corporate sponsorship objectives and strategies of tobacco companies, based primarily on historical documents from the British-American Tobacco Co., which has operations in over 80 countries. The documents are part of the Guildford Depository located in Guildford, England. It contains over six million pages of corporate documents for the British-American Tobacco Company (BAT) from a 40-year span (early 1950s to mid 1990s). Tobacco company sponsorship practices include developing sponsorship evaluation guidelines, extensive prepromotion and post-promotion of sponsored events, making full use of the event site for sponsorship identification, ensuring that sponsored events are televised, and using an extensive array of public relations practices to ensure news coverage of a sponsored event. Other sponsors could benefit from emulating the sponsorship practices of tobacco companies.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Caroline Lilyard and Anita M. Anderson

Briefly highlights the recent lawsuit between the state of Minnesota and seven corporations or organizations promoting the sale of tobacco. Sources for research on the…

Abstract

Briefly highlights the recent lawsuit between the state of Minnesota and seven corporations or organizations promoting the sale of tobacco. Sources for research on the Minnesota lawsuit, and other tobacco litigation, are noted, in particular the Minnesota Document Depository, which houses previously undisclosed tobacco industry documents. It concludes with an Appendix of the timeline and players in the Minnesota tobacco trial from 1994‐1998.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1962

LIGHT rarely comes to people as swiftly as it did to Paul on the Damascus road. More often it is the slow accretion of knowledge through education and persuasion, the…

Abstract

LIGHT rarely comes to people as swiftly as it did to Paul on the Damascus road. More often it is the slow accretion of knowledge through education and persuasion, the steady pressure of convinced advocates and the relentless force of events that opens their minds to new ideas.

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Work Study, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Marcus Woolley

Developing a library while developing oneself is both an enviable and an alarming experience. This case study is valuable for two reasons: first because it is a uniquely…

Abstract

Developing a library while developing oneself is both an enviable and an alarming experience. This case study is valuable for two reasons: first because it is a uniquely realistic blow‐by‐blow description of the upgrading of a poorly organised, under‐resourced, industrial library. As such, it contains useful practical guidance for the many librarians who have similar problems to contend with. Second, and perhaps even more important, because so rare, is the critical and evaluative attitude taken throughout the report. The author identifies his own mistakes, as well as his successes. The report covers the adoption of new information retrieval systems; the devising of a new issue system for a split‐site library; developing periodicals circulation; evaluation of collection use and relevance; proposing the introduction of on‐line services — against a background of financial stringency and entrenched bureaucracy. The author also evaluates his own performance and the training he received, in his first year of running a one‐person library.

Details

Library Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Knight's Industrial Law Reports goes into a new style and format as Managerial Law This issue of KILR is restyled Managerial Law and it now appears on a continuous…

Abstract

Knight's Industrial Law Reports goes into a new style and format as Managerial Law This issue of KILR is restyled Managerial Law and it now appears on a continuous updating basis rather than as a monthly routine affair.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

R.D. Simonson

Surrey Record Office locates and acquires records relating to the history of the county of Surrey, preserves them from loss or damage to ensure their survival as part of…

Abstract

Surrey Record Office locates and acquires records relating to the history of the county of Surrey, preserves them from loss or damage to ensure their survival as part of the heritage of the county and makes them available to all those who wish to use them for a wide range of research. High among the Record Office's priorities is increasing the ease with which the public are able to discover what information is available which is relevant to the subject of their enquiry.

Details

Program, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Stéphanie Looser and Walter Wehrmeyer

This paper aims to investigate, using stakeholder map methodology, showing power, urgency, legitimacy and concerns of different actors, the current state of corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate, using stakeholder map methodology, showing power, urgency, legitimacy and concerns of different actors, the current state of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Switzerland. Previous research on CSR in Europe has made few attempts to identify stakeholders and their contribution to this topic.

Design/methodology/approach

To derive this map, publicly available documents were explored, augmented by 27 interviews with key stakeholders (consumers, media, government, trade unions, non-profit organisations [NPOs], banks, certifiers and consultants) and management of different companies (multinational enterprises [MNEs], small- and medium-sized enterprises [SMEs] and large national companies). Using MAXQDA, the quantified codes given for power, legitimacy and urgency were triangulated between self-reporting, external assessments and statements from publicly available documents and subsequently transferred into stakeholder priorities or, in other words, into positions in the map. Further, the codes given in the interviews for different CSR interests and the results from the document analysis were linked between stakeholders. The identified concerns and priorities were quantitatively analysed in regard to centrality and salience using VennMaker.

Findings

The paper identified SMEs, MNEs and cooperating NPOs as being the most significant stakeholders, in that order. CSR is, therefore, not driven primarily by regulators, market pressure or customers. Further network parameters substantiated the importance of SMEs while following an unconventionally informal and idiosyncratic CSR approach. Hence, insights into these ethics-driven, unformalised business models that pursue broader responsibility based on trust, traditional values, regional anchors and the willingness to “give something back” were formed. Examples of this strong CSR habit include democratic decisions and abolished hierarchies, handshake instead of formal contracts and transparency in all respects (e.g. performance indicators, salaries and bonuses).

Research limitations/implications

In total, 27 interviews as primary data that supplements publicly available documents are clearly only indicative.

Practical implications

The research found an innovative, vibrant and practical CSR model that is emerging for reasons other than conventional CSR agendas that are supposed to evolve. In fact, the stakeholder map and the CSR practices may point at a very different role businesses have adopted in Switzerland. Such models offer a useful, heuristic evaluation of the contribution of formal management systems (e.g. as could be found in MNEs) in comparison to the unformalised SME business conduct.

Originality/value

A rarely reported and astonishing feature of many of the very radical SME practices found in this study is that their link to commercial strategies was, in most cases, not seen. However, SMEs are neither the “poor relative” nor the abridged version of CSR, but are manifesting CSR as a Swiss set of values that fits the societal culture and the visionary goals of SME owners/managers and governs how a sustainably responsible company should behave. Hence, as a new stance and argument within CSR-related research, this paper concludes that “informal” does not mean “weak”. This paper covers a myriad of management fields, e.g. CSR as strategic tool in business ethics; stakeholder and network management; decision-making; and further theoretical frameworks, such as transaction cost and social capital theory. In other words, this research closes scientific gaps by at once applying quantitative as well as qualitative methods and by merging, for the first time, network methodology with CSR and stakeholder research.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Lisa C. Wilson, Andrew Alexander and Margaret Lumbers

Decentralisation of many food retailers to edge‐of‐town and out‐of‐town locations has resulted in some older people experiencing difficulty in accessing food shops and…

Abstract

Decentralisation of many food retailers to edge‐of‐town and out‐of‐town locations has resulted in some older people experiencing difficulty in accessing food shops and those experiencing the greatest difficulties in food shopping are considered to be at the greatest nutritional risk. The present study examines how and to what extent usage of, and physical access to food shops might influence dietary variety. Shopping behaviour and dietary variety are investigated using focus groups, a consumer questionnaire and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). A dietary variety score system, developed from the FFQ, is employed in this study. Neither usage of (particular) food shops nor basic accessibility variables are found to have a direct effect on dietary variety. Yet, coping strategies employed by older consumers to obtain food are revealed to be important. This suggests that more complex access factors remain an important issue for study in relation to the shopping experience of a proportion of the older population.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Michael J Carmel

The United Kingdom library system has a two‐tier resource sharing network, with the regional library services operating at local level and the BLDSC at national level…

Abstract

The United Kingdom library system has a two‐tier resource sharing network, with the regional library services operating at local level and the BLDSC at national level. Taking the National Health Service libraries as a basis, the author discusses regional co‐operation from the organizational, service and economic viewpoints. Interlibrary resource sharing is valuable not only for its tangible benefits, but also (provided it is reliable and economically sound) because it provides a basis for the sharing of specialist subject knowledge, searching skills and ideas, and it also permits more general professional interaction, thus frequently bearing unexpected fruit. Several ideas have been put forward for the extension of inter‐regional co‐operation, but the importance of cost‐benefit analysis when evaluating any such scheme cannot be over‐stressed. The true cost of staff time is an item often overlooked: an appendix here gives a method of calculating the economic benefit of a resource sharing scheme by comparing the cost of co‐operative interlibrary photocopying using a union list of serials with that of using prepaid BLDSC forms.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Yochanan Altman

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Lynne Sedgmore, CBE, Executive Director of 157 Group UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Lynne Sedgmore, CBE, Executive Director of 157 Group UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer.

Findings

Lynne Sedgmore, CBE, is executive director of the 157 Group UK and was formerly chief executive of the UK Centre for Excellence in Leadership. A corporate mystic, her leadership style in her role as principal of Guildford College of Further and Higher Education, UK, was subject of a PhD dissertation. The achievements of the Centre for Excellence in Leadership under her leadership (2003‐2008) have been documented in a series of reports and papers and are now a topic for a book (in writing). The Centre for Excellence in Leadership was awarded the International Spirit at Work Award for its achievements as a spiritual organization. Lynne Sedgmore was awarded the CBE for services to education in 2004.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

This interview provides definitions and conceptualizations of spiritual leasdership.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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