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1 – 10 of over 83000
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2022

Iris Xie, Rakesh Babu, Shengang Wang, Hyun Seung Lee and Tae Hee Lee

This study aims to investigate the perceptional differences of key stakeholders in assessing the Digital Library Accessibility and Usability Guidelines (DLAUG), in which…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the perceptional differences of key stakeholders in assessing the Digital Library Accessibility and Usability Guidelines (DLAUG), in which design information is created and organized by types of help-seeking situations, to support blind and visually impaired (BVI) users. The stakeholders consist of BVI users, digital library (DL) developers and scholars/experts. The focus is on the identification of types of situations in which BVI users and developers show significant perception differences of DLAUG’s relevance, clarity and usefulness than the other two groups, respectively, and the associated reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth survey was conducted to examine the perceptions of 150 participants representing three groups of key DL stakeholders: BVI users, DL developers and scholars/experts. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were applied.

Findings

The results show that BVI users and developers had significant perception differences of the relevance, clarity and usefulness of the DLAUG than the other two groups held on five situations, mainly because they played distinct roles in the development of DLs with differing goals and expectations for the DL design guidelines.

Originality/value

This is the first study that considers different DL stakeholders to assess DL guidelines to support BVI users.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Françoise Cluzeau, Peter Littlejohns, Jeremy Grimshaw and Gene Feder

There is anecdotal evidence of a plethora of guidelines developed throughout the NHS. A national survey was carried out between March and June 1995 to identify the number…

Abstract

There is anecdotal evidence of a plethora of guidelines developed throughout the NHS. A national survey was carried out between March and June 1995 to identify the number of clinical guidelines produced in the UK in the clinical areas of coronary heart disease, asthma, breast cancer, lung cancer and depression. The response to the survey ranged from 95% (interest groups) to 10% (Ministry of Defence and prison hospitals). Four hundred and seventy two guidelines were identified in the survey. Most had been produced locally, only 21 guidelines were classified as national. Results confirm that there is a proliferation of guidelines in most parts of the UK. The survey illustrates the difficulties involved in conducting a UK survey of this kind, and highlights the need for national guideline coordination.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

M.K. Whitworth, F. Reid, R. Arya, R.A. Smith, P.N. Baker and J. Myers

This article aims to assess the standard local recommended management of women with severe pre‐eclampsia and eclampsia in relation to recommendations in a national…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to assess the standard local recommended management of women with severe pre‐eclampsia and eclampsia in relation to recommendations in a national clinical guideline using a criterion‐based survey.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 227 maternity units in the UK were asked to provide a copy of their guideline for the management of severe pre‐eclampsia and eclampsia. Responses were obtained from 107 units (47.1 per cent), 37 units were using regional guidelines and 72 guidelines were available for assessment. A total of ten audit criteria were agreed by committee, based on national recommendations. Guidelines were then audited to assess concurrence with these criteria.

Findings

The standard of guidelines was highly variable with only four guidelines (4.5 per cent) satisfying all ten key guideline points. The majority of guidelines had clear criteria for inclusion (87.5 per cent) but in almost a quarter of all guidelines no mention was made of informing consultant staff once these criteria were met.

Practical implications

The study shows that the standard of local guidelines for management of these potentially fatal conditions is highly variable. Confidential inquiry has repeatedly recommended the use of regional guidelines. Perhaps it is time for the development of a national guideline representing consensus agreement of an evidence‐based approach.

Originality/value

In the UK eclampsia and pre‐eclampsia continue to be a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity. This paper provides a valuable insight into the standard of guidelines used in the management of these conditions.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Andrew Millard

The aim of this project was to compare the intentions with reported action of health Trusts in Scotland to prioritise and implement published SIGN clinical guidelines. All…

1229

Abstract

The aim of this project was to compare the intentions with reported action of health Trusts in Scotland to prioritise and implement published SIGN clinical guidelines. All health Trusts in Scotland were asked about plans for implementation, and resurveyed 15‐18 months later for confirmation. Specific guideline implementation groups led by medical doctors were the most common implementation structure. Implementation usually consisted of baseline audit, development of a local version, and reaudit. In one case a successful link between acute and primary care through an area level GP audit facilitator was thought to increase implementation. More research is required to: find out what influences the ability of an organisation to implement guidelines; identify particular facilitating factors or barriers; and on factors influencing the ability of a health organisation to implement guidelines.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Elena Berti and Roberto Grilli

The quality of 39 guidelines developed locally was assessed, using a standardised instrument addressing five quality domains (scope and purpose, stakeholders involvement…

565

Abstract

The quality of 39 guidelines developed locally was assessed, using a standardised instrument addressing five quality domains (scope and purpose, stakeholders involvement, rigour of development, applicability and clarity). For each of them a domain‐specific quality score (ranging from 0 to 100) was estimated. Overall, local guidelines scored particularly low on rigour (mean: 5.1; sd: 12.1) and applicability (mean: 16.9; sd: 12.9). Scores for other domains were only slightly better. This study suggests that local guidelines do not assure neither scientific validity of the recommendations nor attention to their adoption in clinical practice. Without substantial changes in their local use, practice guidelines will not be of any benefit in supporting the implementation of clinical governance.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Amanda Bowens, Mike Robinson, Ruth McDonald and Phil Ayres

The Path.Finder NHS consortium consists of ten acute hospitals sharing a common approach to the production and dissemination of local information for primary care…

267

Abstract

The Path.Finder NHS consortium consists of ten acute hospitals sharing a common approach to the production and dissemination of local information for primary care, including clinical practice guidelines. Ten local guidelines were studied across four clinical areas: dyspepsia, lipids, eczema, and menorrhagia. Local guideline developers largely appear to be unconvinced that investment of time and resources in “proper” guideline development is cost‐effective. At the same time, primary care professionals’ views about future NICE guidelines may have been coloured by their current much more variable experience. Successful implementation of local guidelines is unlikely to be straightforward.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Varun Potbhare, Matt Syal, Mohammed Arif, Malik M.A. Khalfan and Charles Egbu

The purpose of this paper is to identify the characteristics of green building guidelines in developed countries and to analyze their influence on the evolution and…

2226

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the characteristics of green building guidelines in developed countries and to analyze their influence on the evolution and adoption of similar guidelines in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reviews the green building guidelines in the developed as well as the developing countries such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design guidelines for new construction (LEED® NC‐USA), Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM)‐UK, Comprehensive Assessment System for Building Environmental Efficiency (CASBEE)‐Japan, and LEED®‐India and further performs a comparative analysis of these guidelines.

Findings

Based on the comparative analysis of LEED® NC‐USA, BREEAM‐UK, and CASBEE‐Japan, the characteristics that might have affected their current acceptance were identified. The catalysts and hindrances associated with the acceptance of LEED‐India in India were identified based on the comparative analysis of LEED® NC‐USA and LEED®‐India.

Originality/value

With an exponential growth of construction industry in the rapidly developing countries, there is a definite need to promote the adoption of green building guidelines. The methodology adopted in this research can be applied to understand the evolution as well as future adoption of green building guidelines in other countries that are facing similar circumstances.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Gordon Suddaby and John Milne

The paper aims to discusses two complementary initiatives focussed on developing and implementing e‐learning guidelines to support good pedagogy in e‐learning practice.

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to discusses two complementary initiatives focussed on developing and implementing e‐learning guidelines to support good pedagogy in e‐learning practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The first initiative is the development of a coherent set of open access e‐learning guidelines for the New Zealand tertiary sector. The second project, arising from the e‐learning guidelines project, will implement selected guidelines in 18 tertiary institutions and evaluate the implementation processes and the outcomes.

Findings

The guidelines provide a framework for good pedagogical practice that supports quality e‐learning activity and engages staff in critically reflecting on e‐learning practice. The paper describes how e‐learning quality guidelines contribute to enhanced pedagogical quality, greater collaboration, and an approach that is focused on the learner.

Practical implications

Institutions need to provide motivation, support and resources to successfully implement e‐learning guidelines.

Originality/value

The paper describes an innovative approach to collaborating on improving e‐learning quality and coherence across a national tertiary education system.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

José Labarère, Cécile Bos, Pierrick Bedouch, Magali Fourny, Patricia Pavese, Benoit Allenet and Patrice François

The aim of this study was to assess whether clinical guidelines complied with the instructions for writing structured care management tools in a French university…

350

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess whether clinical guidelines complied with the instructions for writing structured care management tools in a French university hospital. A cross‐sectional study of guidelines for appropriate antimicrobial agent use in the authors’ institution was carried out. A total of 221 guidelines were retrieved in 62 hospital units. The number of guidelines by unit ranged from one to 22 and 198 guidelines (90 per cent) had been developed at the local level. None of the guidelines fully complied with the ten criteria of the instructions. Each guideline met, on average, 4.2 criteria (3.9‐4.5). The partial compliance rate was 75 per cent (68‐80). In two‐level multivariate analysis, factors associated with partial compliance were: dissemination of guidelines after implementation of the instructions (odds ratio=6.25 (2.41‐16.21)), existence of more than one storage site for guidelines in each unit (OR=3.26 (1.03‐10.32)), and hospital unit (variance of the intercept=1.54).

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Andrew Millard

Presents a study which investigates how it was planned to implement guidelines from the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The study aimed to describe the…

Abstract

Presents a study which investigates how it was planned to implement guidelines from the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The study aimed to describe the activity in planning the implementation of SIGN guidelines in Scottish Health Service Trusts in 1996, and to provide a baseline for evaluation. A postal questionnaire was sent to the Clinical Audit lead person in 46 Scottish Health Service Trusts. The response rate after two reminders ranged from 60‐72 per cent across different categories of Trust. The questionnaire asked for plans to implement individual guidelines, adaptation, professions involved, timeframes, dissemination, and evaluation methods. Reveals that local consensus was the main factor in deciding priorities. Most Trusts wished to see other local versions of guidelines produced, and to evaluate implementation collaboratively. Most expected to have reviewed baseline practice before implementation.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

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